or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › IDC: Apple passes RIM to become No. 4 global mobile phone vendor
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

IDC: Apple passes RIM to become No. 4 global mobile phone vendor

post #1 of 59
Thread Starter 
A new IDC report shows strong iPhone sales have pushed Apple past Research in Motion, making the iPhone-maker the world's fourth-largest mobile phone seller in the third quarter of 2010.

According to IDC's Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker, Apple's record quarter was enough to land it a fourth-place spot on the list of global mobile phone vendors, behind Nokia, Samsung and LG Electronics. Though Apple has consistently been a top smartphone vendor, this marks the first quarter that Apple has cracked the top 5 list of global mobile phone vendors.

With Apple and RIM taking fourth and fifth place respectively, Sony Ericsson was ousted from the top 5 for the first time since the inception of the IDC Mobile Phone Tracker report in 2004. According to the report, the iPhone 4 launched in 17 new countries last quarter.

"The entrance of Apple to the top 5 vendor ranking underscores the increased importance of smartphones to the overall market. Moreover, the mobile phone makers that are delivering popular smartphone models are among the fastest growing firms," said Kevin Restivo, IDC senior research analyst.

In terms of growth, Apple dominated its competitors with a 90.5 percent year-over-year increase in sales. Third-place LG missed its smartphone shipment growth targets and fell behind, with shipments dropping 10 percent from 31.6 million in Q3 2009 to 28.4 million in Q3 2010. Although the Seoul, Korea-based company still maintains a wide margin over Apple, the iPhone-maker is steadily gaining on it.

RIM posted the second biggest year-over-year growth, with a record quarter that saw a 45.9 percent increase in shipments from Q3 2009. However, the record numbers weren't enough to hold back Apple.

The IDC data confirms Apple CEO Steve Jobs' assertion that his company had overtaken Blackberry-maker RIM.

"We've now passed RIM," Jobs said during Apple's quarterly conference call. "I don't see them catching up with us in the foreseeable future. It will be a challenge for them to create a mobile software platform and convince developers to support a third platform."

Jim Balsillie, co-CEO of RIM, fired back that Jobs had compared Apple's September-ending quarter to RIM's August-ending quarter without taking into account that "industry demand in September is typically stronger than summer months." However, according to IDC, RIM shipped 12.4 million phones in the September-ending third-quarter, compared to the 12.1 million figure from RIM's August-ending quarter. By comparison, Apple shipped a record 14.1 million iPhones in the third quarter.

Top Five Mobile Phone Vendors, Shipments, and Market Share, Q3 2010 (Units in Millions)

Source: IDC
post #2 of 59
Put up a good fight though.
post #3 of 59
Yeah, Balsillie, just keep telling yourself it's just a rounding error.
It helps Ballmer sleep at night.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #4 of 59
What should really worry RIM is that customers paid money for each one of those iPhones and that Apple didn't have to resort to any BOGO deals to move that many phones.
post #5 of 59
Rest In Motion
I've accomplished my childhood's dream: My job consists mainly of playing with toys all day long.
Reply
I've accomplished my childhood's dream: My job consists mainly of playing with toys all day long.
Reply
post #6 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tofino View Post

What should really worry RIM is that customers paid money for each one of those iPhones and that Apple didn't have to resort to any BOGO deals to move that many phones.

I live in the UK. The iPhone is offered for free here.

You're forgetting that every "free" smartphone is tied to an expensive contract.
post #7 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

I live in the UK. The iPhone is offered for free here.

You're forgetting that every "free" smartphone is tied to an expensive contract.

That may be true, but Apple are getting full price for that phone as the carrier is paying it to them.
The OP was stating that Apple are not having to resort to buy one, get one free deals which I would imagine are subsidised by the carriers as well, but I believe the manufacturer must take a hit on those deals.
..... the greatest fame comes from adding to human knowledge, not winning battles.
Paraphrased from Napolean Bonaparte, 1798
Reply
..... the greatest fame comes from adding to human knowledge, not winning battles.
Paraphrased from Napolean Bonaparte, 1798
Reply
post #8 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

I live in the UK. The iPhone is offered for free here.

iPhones are more expensive in the UK than almost anywhere else - a long way from free.

Reality of it is that iPhone ASP is well above $600 compared to the Blackberry's less than $300.

http://www.asymco.com/wp-content/upl...8.16.41-PM.png
post #9 of 59
I guess that's good if you're an Apple shareholder, but I don't really care about mobile phones. They have a certain subversive potential, in that they are a portable network connected video camera (Edison Carter, anyone?), but desktop computers with programming IDEs is where the real power to change things is.
post #10 of 59
I wonder what these numbers would look like, if they removed devices, that are not ever used as smartphones.

Nokia sell millions of devices which are theoretically capable of Email and web use. But are sold without data plans, and are never employed as smartphones by the users.

C.
post #11 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon T View Post

iPhones are more expensive in the UK than almost anywhere else - a long way from free.

That's exactly my point. Just because a phone is free upfront, it doesn't mean that it's a free phone.

Whether you're buying an iPhone or a BlackBerry, you will pay for it over the length of the contract.

Though I disagree with you that the iPhone is more expensive in the UK than almost anywhere else. A 16GB iPhone 4 on Tesco Mobile is £19 upfront and then 24 months of £45 inc. tax and all other fees. Over the lifetime of the contract, that adds up to $1,747. The same deal on AT&T will cost you $199 up-front and $104.99 a month, excluding taxes and other fees. That's a total of $2718. Competition is a great thing, as I'm sure that Verizon will demonstrate when they get the iPhone next year.
post #12 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

A 16GB iPhone 4 on Tesco Mobile is <snip> $1,747.

I figured out my 32GB iPhone4 was $1446. That's on Three.

C.
post #13 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

I wonder what these numbers would look like, if they removed devices, that are not ever used as smartphones.

Nokia sell millions of devices which are theoretically capable of Email and web use. But are sold without data plans, and are never employed as smartphones by the users.

C.

I wonder what laptop sales would look like if you didn't count the ones that never left peoples desks.

I wonder what off road vehicle sales would look like if you only counted the ones that went off road.

Why is it Nokia's fault the user doesn't use the full functions of the phone? It isn't, which is why you like in a fantasy land with how you want to count devices.
post #14 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

I wonder what laptop sales would look like if you didn't count the ones that never left peoples desks.

I wonder what off road vehicle sales would look like if you only counted the ones that went off road.

Why is it Nokia's fault the user doesn't use the full functions of the phone? It isn't, which is why you like in a fantasy land with how you want to count devices.

While your point is reasonable, I think Carniphage has a decent point, too. Your point applies to current sales (ie don't care what people used it for if they bought it) but Carniphage's would apply to future growth and share. If people are not using a current phone as a smartphone, it's likely going to be less sticky in the future. Those people in the next iteration might choose to get an iPhone, or a Droid or something else.
post #15 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostkiwi View Post

That may be true, but Apple are getting full price for that phone as the carrier is paying it to them.
The OP was stating that Apple are not having to resort to buy one, get one free deals which I would imagine are subsidised by the carriers as well, but I believe the manufacturer must take a hit on those deals.

Probably not, usually the bogo happens when the Carrier commits to a large volume and they don't sell as well as forecast and they have to move them. Manufacturer still charges the same per handset in most cases to the carrier, but providing discounts based on volume. Usually high volume commitments come when the carrier picks a product that they want exclusivity on.
post #16 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

Put up a good fight though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tofino View Post

What should really worry RIM is that customers paid money for each one of those iPhones and that Apple didn't have to resort to any BOGO deals to move that many phones.

RIM is in trouble. They're assaulted on all three fronts now - Android, iOS and WP7.

Shows you what a desperate move announcing the BlackPad was.
post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I guess that's good if you're an Apple shareholder, but I don't really care about mobile phones. They have a certain subversive potential, in that they are a portable network connected video camera (Edison Carter, anyone?), but desktop computers with programming IDEs is where the real power to change things is.

Apple tried to change things with the Mac. They've been trying for decades and have had some success. But they warmed up with the iPod, and then blew everything apart with the iPhone and iPad.

Mobile and desktop experiences beyond the usual desktop is where the real power is.

The *experience*. That's hardware, software, IDEs, etc.

And that wonderful new experience that has changed the very way we view technology is crafted by iOS, iPhone and iPad now.

Sure, there'll be things like integrated implants, cybernetic remote viewing and true 3D holographics down the line.

But for now, I was reflecting the other day, iOS, iPhone and iPad are truly HISTORIC landmarks marking this phase of the IT revolution of these past 30 years. The biggest thing before this was the invention of the mouse and GUI. Everything inbetween was a training bra.
post #18 of 59
Debate aside, I think we all know that we need one other set of numbers. Which is smartphone-only sales. I'm sure it's somewhere around.

We could then dig further into what is considered a smartphone, but we need the data first and see *what* that data considered smartphones to be.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

I wonder what laptop sales would look like if you didn't count the ones that never left peoples desks.

I wonder what off road vehicle sales would look like if you only counted the ones that went off road.

Why is it Nokia's fault the user doesn't use the full functions of the phone? It isn't, which is why you like in a fantasy land with how you want to count devices.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

I wonder what these numbers would look like, if they removed devices, that are not ever used as smartphones.

Nokia sell millions of devices which are theoretically capable of Email and web use. But are sold without data plans, and are never employed as smartphones by the users.

C.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edgar_is_good View Post

While your point is reasonable, I think Carniphage has a decent point, too. Your point applies to current sales (ie don't care what people used it for if they bought it) but Carniphage's would apply to future growth and share. If people are not using a current phone as a smartphone, it's likely going to be less sticky in the future. Those people in the next iteration might choose to get an iPhone, or a Droid or something else.
post #19 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Debate aside, I think we all know that we need one other set of numbers. Which is smartphone-only sales. I'm sure it's somewhere around.

Here's a graph of Nokia sales of all the units they call "converged devices"


The products that are considered to be the equals of the iPhone/Android and WP7 devices are called N-series. These are typically sold with data-plans, and I suspect most people buy them to use them as real smartphones. Look at the purple line.

C.
post #20 of 59
Good job Apple. Keep your foot on the throttle. White knuckle tight.
post #21 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon T View Post

iPhones are more expensive in the UK than almost anywhere else - a long way from free.

It is still cheaper than e.g. in Italy where it costs 779 EUR for the top model.
post #22 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

I live in the UK. The iPhone is offered for free here.

You're forgetting that every "free" smartphone is tied to an expensive contract.

Stop pretending that there is an equivalent system! In the UK, those "free" iPhones have a higher contract price than other free phones. There, every phone has a different monthly rate depending on the phone. In the US, all contract prices are the same. A free phone in the US has the same monthly price as a premium phone. It is like comparing apples to screwdrivers.
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
Reply
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
Reply
post #23 of 59
Sure, it is nice to beat a competitor here and there, but I still don't believe that it is Apple's goal to become the "biggest". They're just having fun making "a product that they would like to use themselves" and since that has proven to be the right concept, the sales logically follow.

I know this is unrelated but I still hope that Apple will some day also relocate the assembly of their products back to the USA, so that our money stays here and we don't have to pay unemployed Americans.
post #24 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranReloaded View Post

Rest In Motion

-or- Research in Stagnation


Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

RIM is in trouble. They're assaulted on all three fronts now - Android, iOS and WP7.

Shows you what a desperate move announcing the BlackPad was.

The PlayBook uses Adobe Air as the UI. They are well managed company but they really dropped the ball in terms of software. It’s amazing that most of the history of smartphones has focused around the HW with only weak SW features until the iPhone shook things up.


Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Debate aside, I think we all know that we need one other set of numbers. Which is smartphone-only sales. I'm sure it's somewhere around.

We could then dig further into what is considered a smartphone, but we need the data first and see *what* that data considered smartphones to be.

QFT


Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Here's a graph of Nokia sales of all the units they call "converged devices”
image: http://www.allaboutsymbian.com/image...okia-chart.png

The products that are considered to be the equals of the iPhone/Android and WP7 devices are called N-series. These are typically sold with data-plans, and I suspect most people buy them to use them as real smartphones. Look at the purple line.

Just look at the Summer 2007 and you can see which phone would compete more directly with the iPhone.

So Nokia is still technically selling more “smartphones” than Apple, but that looks likely to not be the case some time in 2011, based on current trends. Any word on how much profit Apple is getting from the handset market these days? Are they over 40%.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #25 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Apple tried to change things with the Mac. They've been trying for decades and have had some success. But they warmed up with the iPod, and then blew everything apart with the iPhone and iPad.

Mobile and desktop experiences beyond the usual desktop is where the real power is.

The *experience*. That's hardware, software, IDEs, etc.

And that wonderful new experience that has changed the very way we view technology is crafted by iOS, iPhone and iPad now.

Sure, there'll be things like integrated implants, cybernetic remote viewing and true 3D holographics down the line.

But for now, I was reflecting the other day, iOS, iPhone and iPad are truly HISTORIC landmarks marking this phase of the IT revolution of these past 30 years. The biggest thing before this was the invention of the mouse and GUI. Everything inbetween was a training bra.

Superb observations. The full impact won't be understood for a while.......
post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranReloaded View Post

Rest In Motion

More like 'Reset In Motion'. Back to the drawing board for RIM or else be lost in the dust of iOS, Android, and upcoming WebOS.

Apple increments product features one bite at a time...hence the logo. Want the next big thing? You're gonna have to pick another fruit from the Apple Tree.

Reply

Apple increments product features one bite at a time...hence the logo. Want the next big thing? You're gonna have to pick another fruit from the Apple Tree.

Reply
post #27 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

I wonder what laptop sales would look like if you didn't count the ones that never left peoples desks.

I wonder what off road vehicle sales would look like if you only counted the ones that went off road.

Why is it Nokia's fault the user doesn't use the full functions of the phone? It isn't, which is why you like in a fantasy land with how you want to count devices.

Apple doesn't offer any other class of cell phone EXCEPT the smartphone - this is the iPhone numbers stacked against ALL other categories of cell phones produced by these competitors. Moreover, it doesn't include the other iOS devices.
post #28 of 59
To be fair, while RIM's marketshare position has slipped, they have grown their actual market share percentage and have also significantly grown their unit sales.


Their unit sales YOY, are up from 8.5 to 12.4 million for the quarter and their market share went up from 2.9% to 3.6%. So, while Apple has surged massively and grabbed the #4 spot over all, it isn't like RIM has necessarily lost ground. RIM is actually still accelerating unit sales and market share, but the market itself is growing faster. Apple is beating the market in all metrics.

Personally, while I love that Apple is doing well and would like to see them dominate, of the other players I would like to see RIM be successful...I live in Waterloo and they help keep the local job market for developers competitive and help drive salaries up. If and when they tank, it won't be any fun up here.

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply
post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

I figured out my 32GB iPhone4 was $1446. That's on Three.

C.

Perhaps, but then you get free data service for the term. That's not a bad deal at all!
post #30 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post

To be fair, while RIM's marketshare position has slipped, they have grown their actual market share percentage and have also significantly grown their unit sales.


Their unit sales YOY, are up from 8.5 to 12.4 million for the quarter and their market share went up from 2.9% to 3.6%. So, while Apple has surged massively and grabbed the #4 spot over all, it isn't like RIM has necessarily lost ground. RIM is actually still accelerating unit sales and market share, but the market itself is growing faster. Apple is beating the market in all metrics.

Personally, while I love that Apple is doing well and would like to see them dominate, of the other players I would like to see RIM be successful...I live in Waterloo and they help keep the local job market for developers competitive and help drive salaries up. If and when they tank, it won't be any fun up here.

I don't think the end will come so soon, if at all, we'll have to see how things pan out over the next few years. The BlackPad, to me, though, is going to be a significant failure or a big chunk of cash burned through for something not quite thought out. And may affect RIM's reputation badly.
post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post

. RIM is actually still accelerating unit sales and market share, but the market itself is growing faster. Apple is beating the market in all metrics.

RIM's profit per unit is falling very rapidly. This is a classic sign of a business, that has suddenly worked out there's a problem coming.

C.
post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

I don't think the end will come so soon, if at all, we'll have to see how things pan out over the next few years. The BlackPad, to me, though, is going to be a significant failure or a big chunk of cash burned through for something not quite thought out. And may affect RIM's reputation badly.

I'd agree. I think they have made some significant contributions to how we all use smartphones today, which is another reason I'd like them, of all of Apple's competitors, survive and even thrive. But they seem so schizophrenic these days. They don't really know what their long term goals are at a fundamental level. They seem to be throwing darts. The Storm and Playbook, I think, are good examples of the confusion within their company. They look at Apple and completely miss what it is that makes them successful, and then try to emulate that. The Storm was their idea of the iPhone and a complete joke. With the Playbook, it might be a good tablet, it could be a competitor to the iPad even. But, they again missed the point. iPad builds on the success of the iPhone and iOS platform as a whole. The whole iOS ecosystem is common. Playbook introduces a new OS, a new interface, new development platform, new app market place. There is nothing that ties it back to what is familiar to everyone in the RIM ecosystem. They missed the point.

Balsillie is busy chasing hockey teams and Lazaridis is busy trying to leave a [seemingly publicity driven] philanthropic/academic legacy. Neither seems completely focused on RIM anymore. Is it any wonder their company seems directionless?

On a side note, I would like to see mandatory driver's ed for each and every RIM employee. I am tired of playing crash derby when I am leaving my parking lot. None of them seem able to drive...

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply
post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

RIM's profit per unit is falling very rapidly. This is a classic sign of a business, that has suddenly worked out there's a problem coming.

C.

Probably. I am just saying that looking at just their position in the market share ladder is misleading, especially when qualifying their market share. People seem to think it means their market share is dropping. It isn't. They tied with Samsung for second place, behind Apple, in terms of actual market share growth.

Also, RIM is a bit unique in that, of all the major handset manufacturers, they still do a large portion of their manufacturing in North America and in their own facilities. They could conceivably trim costs substantially by offshoring this or entirely mimicking Apple and simply hiring overseas companies to do all of the manufacturing. But, to their credit, Balsillie and Lazaridis want to show they are committed to the community that created their company and have kept thousand of manufacturing jobs in Waterloo and elsewhere in Canada. Same with their call centres.

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply
post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post

Probably. I am just saying that looking at just their position in the market share ladder is misleading, especially when qualifying their market share. People seem to think it means their market share is dropping. It isn't. They tied with Samsung for second place, behind Apple, in terms of actual market share growth.

Also, RIM is a bit unique in that, of all the major handset manufacturers, they still do a large portion of their manufacturing in North America and in their own facilities. They could conceivably trim costs substantially by offshoring this or entirely mimicking Apple and simply hiring overseas companies to do all of the manufacturing. But, to their credit, Balsillie and Lazaridis want to show they are committed to the community that created their company and have kept thousand of manufacturing jobs in Waterloo and elsewhere in Canada. Same with their call centres.

I think the majority of handset costs is components. The manufacture costs are relatively tiny. <$10 per handset. I don't think there's much saving to be made by going offshore.

C.
post #35 of 59
I don't care about market share, units shipped, etc.

SHOW ME THE MONEY (I.E., GROSS PROFITS)!

Wonder what that tables looks like then.

One Apple iPhone makes Apple more money than 10,000 Jitterbugs sold in Florida, so who cares about unit shipments.
post #36 of 59
Hmm, LG look distinctly vulnerable..

3rd spot up for grabs some time in 2011?
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoobs View Post

Hmm, LG look distinctly vulnerable..

3rd spot up for grabs some time in 2011?

I thought so too. They are the only one in the top 5 that sold fewer units into a rapidly growing market.

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply
post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

I think the majority of handset costs is components. The manufacture costs are relatively tiny. <$10 per handset. I don't think there's much saving to be made by going offshore.

C.

Maybe, but Apple et al are offshoring for a reason.

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply
post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post

Maybe, but Apple et al are offshoring for a reason.

Labour costs play a part. But I think the real reason is scalability and consistency.

C.
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post

To be fair, while RIM's marketshare position has slipped, they have grown their actual market share percentage and have also significantly grown their unit sales.


Their unit sales YOY, are up from 8.5 to 12.4 million for the quarter and their market share went up from 2.9% to 3.6%. So, while Apple has surged massively and grabbed the #4 spot over all, it isn't like RIM has necessarily lost ground. RIM is actually still accelerating unit sales and market share, but the market itself is growing faster. Apple is beating the market in all metrics.

Personally, while I love that Apple is doing well and would like to see them dominate, of the other players I would like to see RIM be successful...I live in Waterloo and they help keep the local job market for developers competitive and help drive salaries up. If and when they tank, it won't be any fun up here.

Most RIM handsets are free when you sign up with a phone plan, not so for Apple...if they charged same price as the iPhone I doubt they would sell any.

"Apple people have no objectivity when it comes to criticism of Apple.." Lenovo X1 Carbon is out..bye bye MBAir

Reply

"Apple people have no objectivity when it comes to criticism of Apple.." Lenovo X1 Carbon is out..bye bye MBAir

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › IDC: Apple passes RIM to become No. 4 global mobile phone vendor