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The Great Wall Street of China.

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Having invented possibly the most boring title for a thread ever, the "miscallaneous news" thread, I got all two and three quaters brain cells to fire simultaneously and came up with this highly thought provoking scorcher!

Your thoughts in depth please.
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"Islam is as dangerous in a man as rabies in a dog"~ Sir Winston Churchill. We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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post #2 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hands Sandon View Post

Having invented possibly the most boring title for a thread ever, the "miscallaneous news" thread, I got all two and three quaters brain cells to fire simultaneously and came up with this highly thought provoking scorcher!

Your thoughts in depth please.

As regards...

(a) "The rosy, cozy relationship that exists between the American corporate/financial powers-that-be with a brutal totalitarian, communist power with a human/civil rights record worse than any nation one may care to name..."? or

(b) the fact that this communist, totalitarian ation have played a major hand in financing the >$1.5 Trillion war exploits that were instigated by the neocons on the Bush Administration, and expanded by the current Obama Administration? or

(c) "Why does US big business hate democracy"?

Or what?
"We've never made the case, or argued the case that somehow Osama bin Laden was directly involved in 9/11. That evidence has never been forthcoming". VP Cheney, 3/29/2006. Interview by Tony Snow
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"We've never made the case, or argued the case that somehow Osama bin Laden was directly involved in 9/11. That evidence has never been forthcoming". VP Cheney, 3/29/2006. Interview by Tony Snow
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post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sammi jo View Post

As regards...

(a) "The rosy, cozy relationship that exists between the American corporate/financial powers-that-be with a brutal totalitarian, communist power with a human/civil rights record worse than any nation one may care to name..."? or

(b) the fact that this communist, totalitarian ation have played a major hand in financing the >$1.5 Trillion war exploits that were instigated by the neocons on the Bush Administration, and expanded by the current Obama Administration? or

(c) "Why does US big business hate democracy"?

Or what?


Good points.

And when Dems try to keep jobs in the US the Repubs vote against it-

"The bill at issue in the Senate would exempt companies that import jobs from paying the 6.2 percent Social Security payroll tax for new U.S. employees who replace overseas workers who had been doing similar work.
The two-year exemption would be available for workers hired over the next three years. The tax cut estimated to cost about $1 billion would be partially offset by tax increases on companies that move jobs overseas.
The bill would prohibit firms from taking deductions for business expenses associated with expanding operations in other countries. It would increase taxes on U.S. companies that close domestic operations and expand foreign ones to import products to the U.S."
~ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/0..._n_741902.html
"Islam is as dangerous in a man as rabies in a dog"~ Sir Winston Churchill. We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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"Islam is as dangerous in a man as rabies in a dog"~ Sir Winston Churchill. We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hands Sandon View Post

And when Dems try to keep jobs in the US the Repubs vote against it

And when the Dems want borrow another trillion dollars from them...what happened/happens then?

You keep operating under the delusion that one party is good (Democrats) and one party is bad (Republicans) here and failing to see that they are both two wings of the same bird of prey.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

And when the Dems want borrow another trillion dollars from them...what happened/happens then?

You keep operating under the delusion that one party is good (Democrats) and one party is bad (Republicans) here and failing to see that they are both two wings of the same bird of prey.

I don't totally agree, but I see the point. The whole "shipping jobs overseas" thing is somewhat misleading, because we often do import more jobs than we export. However, we keep approaching this from the wrong angle. We need more laws like the one quoted earlier in this thread. Make the US the best place in the world to do business, and jobs will come. Lower taxes, less regulations, etc. They will work.

That doesn't mean we're going to completely turn the tide. Manufacturing is gone...in some cases for good. It's simply too expensive to pay American workers as "livable wage" (though I hate that term) of $15-20 an hour, when a company can pay $5 an hour or less to the Chinese.
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDW2001 View Post

Manufacturing is gone...in some cases for good.

Some but not all. In actuality, US manufacturing output, in (real) dollar terms, is higher than it's ever been. We're simply manufacturing generally higher value items and we have much higher productivity.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hands Sandon View Post

Having invented possibly the most boring title for a thread ever, the "miscallaneous news" thread, .......

Never heard of it.
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #8 of 22
China Buys Wall Street
Donald Straszheim, 12.27.07, 06:00 AM EST
Every U.S. broker wants China Investment Company as partner.

Quote:
The subprime mortgage problem has now yielded a full-blown credit squeeze on Wall Street with securities firms' stock prices at fire-sale levels. The new fire-sale buyers are the so-called sovereign wealth funds, and China's are the most prominent.

With the world's largest trade surplus, China is accumulating foreign exchange reserves of about $1 billion per day. Rather than holding these reserves in low-paying Treasury securities, China recently created a new sovereign wealth fund--China Investment Company (CIC)--to invest these funds more profitably. Market participants, pay attention.

The West worries about whether these sovereign wealth fund investors will act like conventional rate-of-return focused investors or will have a different agenda in mind. Two points: First, if the sovereign wealth fund investors are rate-of-return motivated, they might have a much longer time horizon than the typical short-term-focused U.S. institutional investor. I am an optimist on this--increasingly disgusted during my many years in the investment world at the ever shorter term focus on stock prices. To me, anything that extends investors' time horizons would be positive, allowing companies to plan and act for the long run.

But second, if the sovereign wealth fund's agenda even borders on the geo-political, or may set up a sequence of events that is uncomfortable to the host country, then such funds' investments are going to be rejected in many parts of the world. China says it wants " ... to be treated as a common investor in financial markets and will follow international practice regarding disclosure." Fine. But China is a non-market economy that is dominated by the state sector. It is understandable that foreign governments are guarded, given that explicitly stated policy in Beijing is to develop centrally owned state enterprises into positions of global dominance. It is hard for many to accept that CIC would have a less-expansive or less-strategic view......

Is Wall Street chasing China's stock market?

Quote:
BEIJING/HONG KONG: Morgan Stanley chief executive James Gorman wasn't going to miss his chance. It didn't matter that he was on holiday. Gorman dropped everything and flew to Beijing last April. He wanted to show up in person to make sure his firm got a piece of what was shaping up to be the biggest initial public offering in history.

In Beijing, Gorman spent hours rehearsing with his team for a half-hour pitch to executives of Agricultural Bank of China, whose IPO would eventually raise $22 billion.

"For a half-hour bake-off, he came all that way," Wei Christianson, Morgan Stanley's China CEO, said in an interview last month from her office near Financial Street in Beijing....

Economists at Goldman Sachs believe that mainland China's market capitalization will rise to $41 trillion by 2030 from $5 trillion now. That would make China's stock market the biggest in the world. U.S. market cap is expected to grow to $34 trillion from $14 trillion over that time.

But with China, American financial powerhouses may have met their match. Here, government connections and family ties can trump decades of banking experience and western swagger. So for all their efforts -- and kowtowing -- this is likely to remain one tough market Wall Street firms....

In Beijing, where the towering gray headquarters of the world's largest banks -- Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, China Construction Bank and Bank of China -- cast a long shadow, Wall Street banks are still on the outside looking in.

The towers in and around Financial Street wouldn't look out of place on Wall Street. But looks can be deceiving.

"You can't just come in here and act like this is New York and try to operate the same way you would in New York," said Philip Partnow, who heads China M&A for UBS.

Global banks trying to jumpstart their China operations are tangled in a web of strict regulation, culture clashes and politics. They worry too that even the sweat equity they are putting into training their partners in the ways of western banking will be lost. Some wonder whether China's long-term plan includes their foreign guests from Wall Street.

"At some point, the Chinese want to get to the point where they don't need the foreign investment banks," said Michael Werner, a Hong Kong-based China banking analyst with Sanford C. Bernstein.

China Goes to Wall Street

Quote:
Summary: Chinese companies and government-sponsored investment vehicles are increasingly purchasing U.S. assets. For all the concerns about Chinas large holdings of U.S. Treasury bills, its investments in American companies could be met with even greater sensitivity.

DO FINANCING BIASES MATTER FOR THE CHINESE ECONOMY?

Quote:
It is widely acknowledged that Chinas financial system is deeply troubled. Its banks have very high nonperforming loan ratios and its stock market has lost 50 percent of its value since 2001 amidst a GDP growth rate averaging some 9 percent a year. Those facts about the accounting aspects of Chinas financial system are becoming better known in the West. However, what has not been sufficiently high- lighted is the precise effect of Chinas dysfunctional financial system and its broader pattern of allocating resourcesin favor of the state sector at the expense of the private sectoron the Chinese economy and society.

Probably the only reason economists and business analysts have found it hard to reconcile the accounting aspects of Chinas financial system with the performance aspects of the Chinese economy is that Chinas GDP growth has been so impressive. Some experts (e.g., Rawski 2001,Young 2003) have argued that Chinas economic perfor- mance has not been as impressive as the official statistics indicate. Their work in this area delves into rather specialized and arcane areas of Chinese methods of compiling and reporting data. While this work is analytically important and does resolve some of the puzzles of Chinas rapid growth, it is very technical and difficult for nonspecial- ists to understand. Thus, it is unlikely to grab readers attention away from newspaper headlines touting the rise of China and the huge trade surpluses that country has accumulated.

Quote:
Many Western observers believe that China today is a dynamic market economy. I agree that China has a large foreign sector that is completely market oriented, and in many downstream industries do- mestic entrepreneurship is vibrant and is growing very fast. But the fundamental orientation of the Chinese state has not been supportive of private ownership of assets and private provisions of goods and services.

The fact is that as of 2003, less than 2 percent of the short-term bank credits went to domestic private firms. In 2003, 40 percent of fixed asset investments occurred in the explicit state sector and an- other 33 percent occurred in a sector of other ownership of which state-controlled shareholding firms comprised the vast majority. Only 14 percent occurred in the explicitly private sector. Is 14 percent large or small? I do not know; all I know is that the private sector already accounted for some 20 percent of fixed asset investments as early as 1980.

In 1998, Nicholas Lardy published an excellent book on Chinas problematic banks. He entitled the book Chinas Unfinished Eco- nomic Revolution to convey the idea that the financial sector is the last frontier of Chinese reforms. But finance pervades every aspect of an economy, and, as impressive as the development of Chinas product market has been, it is undeniable that its factor marketsforcapital and landare still tightly controlled by the state. Maybe it is time to write a book with the following title: Has Chinas Economic Revolution Begun?
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

Never heard of it.

I'm goingb too chec al yur postes 4 spelin mitackez
"Islam is as dangerous in a man as rabies in a dog"~ Sir Winston Churchill. We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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"Islam is as dangerous in a man as rabies in a dog"~ Sir Winston Churchill. We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
Reply
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hands Sandon View Post

I'm goingb too chec al yur postes 4 spelin mitackez

Relax, just couldn't let that one pass, no hard feelings?

無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

Relax, just couldn't let that one pass, no hard feelings?


I am god damed rwellaxxxed! Sheesh i thought i wad being finny?

Anay way, NK what's thw latest? I hurd some troubles coming... Got info?
"Islam is as dangerous in a man as rabies in a dog"~ Sir Winston Churchill. We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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"Islam is as dangerous in a man as rabies in a dog"~ Sir Winston Churchill. We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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post #12 of 22
If you've followed the news in the past two weeks, you might have caught the news about China, who has control of most of the rare earth exports, decided to suspend or reduce exports--especially to Japan. The Japanese are now looking to Viet Nam as a possible source. Until alternate sources are developed, could China now use this as a bargaining chip to get what they can't achieve through diplomacy?

More:

Pentagon Is `Myopic' Over China's Rare Earths Monopoly, U.S. Lawmaker Says

Quote:
The U.S. Defense Department is short- sighted in its assessment that Chinas monopoly on rare-earth materials, which are used in military hardware, poses no threat to national security, said U.S. Representative Mike Coffman.

The Pentagons report, on which some members of Congress have been briefed prior to its release, notes that rising prices and supply uncertainties are spurring private investment in new mining operations outside of China that will help meet American military needs, a person familiar with the findings said. Military use accounts for less than 5 percent of U.S. rare-earth consumption, according to the report.

Quote:
I strongly disagree with the reports conclusions, said Coffman, a Colorado Republican who received a briefing today on the Pentagons yearlong study. Its a very myopic view and its certainly not looking at the economic security of the country, he said in a phone interview. Its only looking at the Department of Defense.

US inquiry into China rare earth shipments

Quote:
US trade officials say they are looking into a New York Times report that China is blocking shipments of rare earths to the US and Europe.

China mines 97% of the specialist metals crucial to green technology.

The report, citing anonymous industry sources, said Chinese customs officials had broadened export restrictions.

China's rare-earth manifesto

Quote:
For nearly a month, China has blocked the export to Japan of rareearth metals, obscure minerals with names that sound like sciencefiction fantasies but whose applications make them essential to modern life. Manufacturers employ the 17 rareearth elements in everything from smart bombs to windshields; the average car contains close to five kilograms of rare earths. Wind turbines use magnets made from neodymium, halogen lights need scandium and the battery packs in hybrid cars use at least 12 kilograms of lanthanum. While their uses are myriad, more than 95% of the world's rareearth supply currently originates in China. Even before its trade dispute with Japan, China this summer announced a 40% reduction in export quota for 2010 compared with the previous year. As China hoards its precious minerals, manufacturers scramble for other suppliers. And Canadian companies will benefit from the rareearth rush. "End users want to see an alternative supply. So that's the opportunity that's presented itself," says Don Bubar, president and CEO of Avalon Rare Metals, which is developing an $899million project in the Northwest Territories.

Amid Strained Trade Relations with China, Japan Strikes Rare-Earths Deal with Vietnam

Quote:
In the midst of whats been shaping up as an undeclared rare earths standoff between China and some of its biggest customers in Japan and the West, Vietnamese and Japanese leaders have decided to collaborate in the exploitation of northern Vietnams rare earth elements. The deal was hammered out between the two nations prime ministers during a meeting on Sunday.
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

If you've followed the news in the past two weeks, you might have caught the news about China, who has control of most of the rare earth exports, decided to suspend or reduce exports--especially to Japan. The Japanese are now looking to Viet Nam as a possible source. Until alternate sources are developed, could China now use this as a bargaining chip to get what they can't achieve through diplomacy?

More:

Pentagon Is `Myopic' Over China's Rare Earths Monopoly, U.S. Lawmaker Says



US inquiry into China rare earth shipments



China's rare-earth manifesto



Amid Strained Trade Relations with China, Japan Strikes Rare-Earths Deal with Vietnam

Why "especially Japan"?
"Islam is as dangerous in a man as rabies in a dog"~ Sir Winston Churchill. We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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"Islam is as dangerous in a man as rabies in a dog"~ Sir Winston Churchill. We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hands Sandon View Post

Why "especially Japan"?

Let just say that the history goes back a long ways. China and Japan have long been traditional enemies or rivals. Doesn't mean that they can't get together on some issues. Korea and Japan, also long time enemies, get along when they have to, but sometimes certain issues get in the way and old animosities get in the way of reason and diplomacy.

China boosts maritime surveillance fleet amid disputes

Quote:
China is expanding its fleet of naval surveillance ships amid maritime disputes with several neighbouring countries, state media have reported.

Japan and China are locked in their worst dispute in years over a naval collision near islands both claim.

The islands in the East China Sea, known in Japan as Senkaku and in China as Diaoyu, are controlled by Japan, but claimed by China.

The dispute began when a Chinese trawler captain was arrested near the islands by Japan's coastguard in early September after colliding with two Japanese patrol boats.

The row has sparked nationalist protests in both countries. China has sent fisheries patrol vessels to the islands while reports in Japan say Tokyo plans to add six submarines to its navy.

Diaoyu Islands Dispute

Quote:
The on-going sovereignty dispute between Japan, the People's Republic of China (PRC) and the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan over the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands [1] raises a number of significant issues relative to island and maritime disputes in Asia Pacific rim. In general, the issue can be identified by three points. First of all, none of the three governments want the issue to become a source of difficulties in their bilateral relationships. However, the three governments are driven by a number of domestic and international political factors. Moreover, while the issue of ownership of natural resources is the main point in this dispute, it is believed that the dispute itself is not simply about "oil". Political issues related to other disputes and pressure from domestic interests make this dispute complicated. Finally, while conflict between the three countries over the dispute is unlikely, so is any form of resolution, or joint exploitation of the area's natural resources.

Students in China protest Japan
By Anita Chang, Associated Press
Oct. 23, 2010 11:26 p.m. MDT

Quote:
BEIJING Hundreds of people staged an anti-Japan protest in southwestern China on Saturday, even as school officials there ordered students to attend classes over the weekend in hopes of preventing a repeat of rowdy demonstrations over the past weeks.

Some have suggested that the demonstrations in China were government supported.

Japan's Denial of The Rape of Nanking

Quote:
History reads that for a six week period after the Japanese captured the Chinese city, Japanese forces engaged in the rape and murder of civilians, and the wholesale slaughter of Chinese POWs. Estimates range from 140,000 to 300,000 civilians murdered, and 20,000 to 80,000 women raped. However, even before the full extent of the slaughter was known, Japan was already trying to deny and cover up what had happened at Nanking.

Even to this day, despite eyewitness testimony from journalists, and even Japanese soldiers confirming the atrocities, right wing political parties and Japanese nationalists still consider the Rape of Nanking as nothing more than an elaborate hoax. But what evidence do they have to support their argument? Why were the Japanese trying to cover up what had happened in the city? Why were they in China in the first place? A quick glance at history does much to explain why Japan would want such an event erased from the pages of history.

Nanking - Hulu
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

Let just say that the history goes back a long ways. China and Japan have long been traditional enemies or rivals. Doesn't mean that they can't get together on some issues. Korea and Japan, also long time enemies, get along when they have to, but sometimes certain issues get in the way and old animosities get in the way of reason and diplomacy.

China boosts maritime surveillance fleet amid disputes



Diaoyu Islands Dispute



Students in China protest Japan
By Anita Chang, Associated Press
Oct. 23, 2010 11:26 p.m. MDT



Some have suggested that the demonstrations in China were government supported.

Japan's Denial of The Rape of Nanking



Nanking - Hulu

Thanks.

I read about the island thing recently and hadn't connected the dots.
"Islam is as dangerous in a man as rabies in a dog"~ Sir Winston Churchill. We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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"Islam is as dangerous in a man as rabies in a dog"~ Sir Winston Churchill. We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
Reply
post #16 of 22
China and US failed at the G-20 summit

Quote:
Both China and America are feeling more pressure to export, though for different reasons. Will the global economy moving towards protectionism?

The three-page communique that also emerged from the session brims with bromides about the importance of rebalancing the global economy, coordinating policies, and refraining from competitive devaluations.

All nice, but not a single word of agreement from China about revaluating the yuan, or from the United States about refraining from further moves by the Fed to flood the U.S. economy with money (thereby reducing interest rates, causing global investors to look elsewhere for higher returns, and lowering the value of the dollar).

China and the U.S. are the only big players in the currency game. And with neither of them stepping up to bat, the game is in dangerous territory. Other nations will now do whatever they can to reduce the value of their currencies in order to stimulate more exports and therefore create more jobs.

無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #17 of 22
Chinas SAIC Acquired GM Stake

Quote:
Chinas largest automakers SAIC Motor Corporation has agreed to buy a stake in General Motors at United States auto giant public offering. SAIC, which is having a two vehicle manufacturing shared ventures with General Motors in China is going to buy one percent of GM for 500 million dollars, as reported by the China Securities Journal....

The United States auto giant said previously this month that they are now the first international carmakers to sell two million of vehicles in just one year in China which is considered as the world largest auto-market.

無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #18 of 22
First it was problems in Chinese imported dry wall having toxic volitile chemicals http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_Ch...ll_controversy

Then it was melamine tainted pet food and milk products

http://www.usatoday.com/money/indust...ood-usat_N.htm

http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/content/...ine-china.aspx

http://articles.cnn.com/2008-10-28/h...y?_s=PM:HEALTH

Now its lead in reusable shopping bags:

Reusable Shopping Bags From China Contain Lead

Quote:
Reusable shopping bags, which are touted by food chains as being good for the environment, may actually be harmful to consumers' health, according to the Associated Press and several other reports.

New York Senator Charles Schumer is calling for a probe into the manufacturer of the canvas bags due to heightened levels of lead in the painted designs on the front. Schumer said that many of the bags that are sold nationwide are manufactured in China.

Perhaps any imports into the US should pass the same environmental and health regulations that we demand from US manufacturers.
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #19 of 22
Japan abandons bid to make China a key pillar of its foreign policy

Quote:
China's recent aggressive behavior over disputed islands spurred Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan to turn his back on earlier efforts to rebalance ties with China and the United States.

Shaken by Chinas ferocious behavior during a recent territorial dispute over a string of uninhabited islets, Japan has abandoned its earlier plans to make ties with Beijing a key pillar of a bold new foreign policy.

Instead, Tokyo is falling back for support on its traditional ally the United States, and seeking succor from other Asian nations who share fresh Japanese doubts about the regional implications of Chinas rise.
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #20 of 22

Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

Reply
post #21 of 22
Hong Kong Stock Trading Reaches Record on China Economy Concern

Quote:
Nov. 17 (Bloomberg) -- A record number of shares traded on the Hong Kong stock exchange in the last three days amid mounting concern that the fastest inflation in two years will prompt China to step up measures to cool its economy.

The total volume of exchange-traded securities surged to an all-time high of 254.9 billion on Nov. 12, according to data from the stock exchange. That was followed by 226.7 billion on Nov. 15, and yesterdays 215.9 billion, exchange data shows. The previous high was 211.4 billion on Oct. 20.

The benchmark Hang Seng Index dropped for a third day yesterday, extending its three-day decline to 4.1 percent. Premier Wen Jiabao said the cabinet is drafting measures to counter price gains as the government attempts to curb the fastest inflation in two years. The Hang Seng Index reached its highest intraday level this year at 24,988.57 on Nov. 8.
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #22 of 22
Bernanke on China

Quote:
....Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke mounted his most detailed defense against charges that the Fed is deliberately cheapening the dollar by printing $600 billion to buy U.S. Treasurys and tried to point the finger at Chinas reluctance to let its currency rise faster. Mr. Bernanke spoke in the language of a Princeton University economist, which he used to be, and avoided quotable phrases like Alan Greenspans 1996 warning of irrational exuberance or Brazilian finance minister Guido Mantegas more recent talk of a currency war....
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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