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Apple to discontinue Xserve after Jan. 31, 2011 - Page 6

post #201 of 333
The computer industry is slowly but surely moving away from the antiquated BIOS to EFI, particularly in the enterprise space. Apple will be able to license Mac OS X Server for other manufacturers' systems, including blades, which are far more attractive than Xserves.
post #202 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by pondosinatra View Post

Yes. Jobs earned millions of dollars. Not the people who worked at NeXT and bought into his BS vision and most importantly not the consumers who actually bought the machines and were then abandoned.

But hey, in your eyes as long as Steve makes money it's all good.

What the fuck is wrong with you? His "bullshit" vision? What does that even mean?

After being forced out at Apple, he started another company. After briefly building hardware that proved to be overpriced for the market, that company concentrated on an operating system that is now OS X, after being purchased by Apple. Really not a terrible outcome. Are you thinking that the people that bought Next hardware were somehow betrayed because Next couldn't make a go of it? So every single consumer product that isn't maintained in perpetuity is an "abandonment?" Because that's just basically crazy talk.

Is Andy Rubin peddling bullshit as well? After all, where are all the Danger Hiptop devices? What about all those Danger employees? Destitute, no doubt. Where's the support for the orphaned Danger customers? Oh yeah, it's Android now, but it doesn't count.
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post #203 of 333
You obviously dont know what the hell youre talking about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GelfTheElf View Post

I don't know why everyone is freaking out...

- The new Mac Mini with Leopard Server is close to the same specs for 1/3rd the price.
- You don't really need the faster processors in a server.
- You can get external raid storage if you need it (Mac Mini has FireWire 800)

And mostly.. Apple is pushing "going green"
- Mac Mini's use 10W of power when idling. (max of 80W) XServe does max of 750W??
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post #204 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post

Apple will be integrating SSDs into all new Macs.
Since Apple buys these chips in freaking huge quantities, they will be able to offer a generation of Macs that will be able to offer performance at a price the Wintel world can't match.

The iPad was the first true example of this.
Apple used to be the more expensive option.
The iPad is actually the less expensive option in the tablet market.

So do you then predict that bang-for-buck will keep the Apple desktops alive? Is that what you are saying?
post #205 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

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.All of which ignores the fact ...



So you ... dream up a scenario which is completely CONTRADICTORY to the facts?



So what? ...

... Get it?




... proving you don't have a clue


These statements are all a bit harsh.
post #206 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by pondosinatra View Post

Killing off their Enterprise group just shows that Apple is well on their way to abandoning the Mac and instead focusing on cheap, disposable, gadgets as their sole reason for existance. Sad.


They is gonna do the best they can with what they got. Just like every other company.

Killing off less profitable ventures leaves capital for more profitable ventures.
post #207 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by davida View Post

Apple should be Apple's #1 customer for enterprise, but they don't use what they make. For example, Mac OS X Server has mail, but Apple uses Exchange servers internally.

That reminds me of when Motorola built the CPU's in Apple computers and their IT team decided to use all Intel-based PC's in the company.

Honestly, it amazes me. If you can't, don't, or won't use your own product then it does not help to sell the product. At all.
post #208 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

1) Learn the origins of such paraphrasing that is done for comic effect. They will show up again.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lj056ao6GE 2) Saying that satellite computing devices will outnumber typical PCs is not some farfetched notion. iOS devices (which you refer to as iToys) already outnumber the number of Macs sold by 6 to 1. If we look at all other major PC makers and MS, they are all focusing their attention on satellite computing.

3) Dicks statement isnt saying that desktop computers will go away completely, but that our reliance on them as our primary means of communicating digitally will wane. This is the nature of all tech. Paradigm shifts do happen and with mobile computing getting more robust there simply is less need for the average person to have PC in every room. We already had this shift from desktops to notebooks, now were seeing this with handheld devices that suit the majority of casual computing needs.

4) I predict well see an upsurge of desktops as the single, powerful, stationary computer, with multiple smartphones and tablets in a household serving a multitude of satellite computing needs. Even the TV will get involved in future of computing.

You go, Hedley... I'll join you later 'round the campfire...

Here's one with Bogey:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqomZQMZQCQ

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post #209 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasenj1 View Post

Right. But Apple no longer has a solution for the server room. OS X Server may be viable for folks using Mac minis, or Pros as servers. And maybe that market is large enough to keep OS X Server around. But the rack-mount crowd is SOL. They'll have to use Macs as clients only. That seems like a poor move if Apple is claiming to have a new enterprise push.

I guess Apple is saying: "We're a consumer oriented company. If you want to use our products in the enterprise, go talk to Unisys, et al."

It may make perfect business sense, but it's sad to see. A "serious" computer company should have rack-mount servers. With this, Apple moves more toward being a "consumer electronics" company and away from being a "computer" company. I miss Apple Computer.

- Jasen.

It depends. My first reaction here was to think what you're thinking. But I'm not so sure now. Further thinking on this has made me change my mind somewhat. In fact I now think that it was the deal with Unisys that's allowed, and even spured this decision. The question is of the doubling of Apple's presense in enterprise, how much of this consists of XServes.
post #210 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

As I said earlier, perhaps Steve and Larry have a Sun / Apple concept for Enterprise cooking?

*That* would be a great move, IMHO. Apples never really been able to address the enterprise need (even though XServe was a good product) they never really understood the needs of data center and system administrator. Sun, however, does.

(BTW, I worked for years as a senior Solaris system admin and assistant data center manager)

License MAc OS X server to a company that gets IT.
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post #211 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by godrifle View Post

License MAc OS X server to a company that gets IT.

But why even this? Is Mac OS X Server such a great server OS, especially when compared with things like Solaris or even Linux?

Server OSes are a different animal from consumer/desktop OSes. I'm not sure Apple has much to offer there.

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post #212 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I agree... servers are definitely part of the picture.

I just don't see desktop computers at the workstation -- why tether productivity?

FWIW, AAPL has been trading even to down, $0.50 -- so the "bad news" hasn't hurt.

Apple could announce licensing of OS X Server -- or just do it!

I don't think that it will affect AAPL price much.

If they do license OS X Server then they potentially have 3rd party reps that can build Apple solutions from the back office out, and the front office in.

Apple could increase sales and enterprise penetration by taking advantage of the expertise and established "inside" relationships of companies such as Unisys.

,

Apple closed down by 74 cents, but the market was down, and MS was down by several times as much percentage wise, as were other computer companies.
post #213 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

But why even this? Is Mac OS X Server such a great server OS, especially when compared with things like Solaris or even Linux?

Server OSes are a different animal from consumer/desktop OSes. I'm not sure Apple has much to offer there.

Yes it does when supporting mainly Mac SO X clients. Try modifying a AD to support Apple MCX:es for client control...

There is a place for it. Not for you perhaps but for me it´s is one of the easiest server softwares to get all essential services running in no time.
post #214 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

4) I predict well see an upsurge of desktops as the single, powerful, stationary computer, with multiple smartphones and tablets in a household serving a multitude of satellite computing needs. Even the TV will get involved in future of computing.

I sure hope so. That's the perfect combination for my family.

Most of the time a satellite device is good enough, but sometimes you need a powerful computer with an enormous display for efficient content creation. A single box that can be a creation and gaming tool and also act as a home server will continue to make sense far into the future.
post #215 of 333
So many apropos comments, where to begin?

If you have a business to run, as the old saw goes, and Cupertino has succeded in making the point SO clearly:

Nobody ever got fired for choosing IBM.

Somebody else upthread mentioned that Apple is now officially a toy maker. Boy you can say that again. With a toy maker's attitude to boot. Steve came back, rescued the company from oblivion by making feature loaded hardware with a killer OS, got the bright idea to try making pocket sized, throw-away little POS gadgets, and saw the light: the future lies in becoming the kind of "computer company" that the people tend to deserve. (My apologies to Thomas Jefferson) i.e. one that will soon have no reason to provide any customer support whatsoever. Their success with keychain toys changed the company's business environment. Ecologists call this phenomenon a sere.

Monologue at the Genius bar: "Kowabunga!, your Ipod nano with all of your priceless personal chat history and your $1.99 toenail trimmer app in it stopped working? There, there, let's just toss it in the circular file and give you a new one. Consider yourself "customer serviced", ...and have a nice day! ...You sir, with the XServe labeled "Acctng.
Dept." under your arm. You're next!!"

We poor suckers that answered the call of the XServe fell prey to several things. 1. We thought it was a Mac. 2. Apple's having touched the nerve of what the public appears to want -there's more of them than corporate customers anyhow and they're a lot easier to dupe and they tend not to have legal departments. 3. "Keeping hardware & software engineers & support lines for business customers on the payroll is costly and a pain in the neck anyhow---we're better off without them." 4. Apple's corporate Borderline Personality Disorder. 5. Etc.

Others mentioned a fairyland deal with Oracle, or running SL Server on Dells, etc. What fool would ever again trust Apple for a serious business oriented solution? Dollars to doughnuts, SL Server is the last version of a server OS to ever come out of Cupertino. There will be no Lion Server, it's not consumer oriented.

The times they are a changin' and we all have no choice but to go with the flow. You want to make some dough? Stop cryin' and get yourself to work on perfecting that ERP package for iOS.
post #216 of 333
A Mac Pro will be fine for smaller companies, but if you've got a couple of racks of xserves, the dual PSU, LOM, hotswap disks and things like that really matter. the performance of the macpro is fine, but the real server features just aren't there, and can't be added to the macpro
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post #217 of 333
There's a good discussion at: http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/20...1#comments-bar as to what a monumentally stupid decision this is.
post #218 of 333
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For those that admin a server farm:

1) As the servers are headless, I assume you can monitor any server from a remote desktop computer -- run diagnostics, update software, backup manually (when necessary), reboot, etc..

2) When you determine you need to "touch the iron" -- actually go out to the device in question...

What do you use to connect to the device -- a laptop?

How do you connect -- WiFi, KVM switch, BT?

What software do you run?

Is the software on the server, the laptop, both (VNC)?

Could an iPad be used for this purpose or would the tablet need Windows 7?

.
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post #219 of 333
Wow. I'd wager some folks at Parallels Holdings are a bit tweaked at the moment. And I thought I was having a tough day!
post #220 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExtraO View Post

...the future lies in becoming the kind of "computer company" that the people tend to deserve...

Bingo. Apple used to actually give a crap about their consumers because with their small market share and the beating they were taking at the hands of Intel/MS they had to. People held them to a higher standard. Now with them moving to be the next Sony they just don't give a crap - "Hey you over there! look at the pretty lights!"
post #221 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

.

For those that admin a server farm:

1) As the servers are headless, I assume you can monitor any server from a remote desktop computer -- run diagnostics, update software, backup manually (when necessary), reboot, etc..

2) When you determine you need to "touch the iron" -- actually go out to the device in question...

What do you use to connect to the device -- a laptop?

How do you connect -- WiFi, KVM switch, BT?

What software do you run?

Is the software on the server, the laptop, both (VNC)?

Could an iPad be used for this purpose or would the tablet need Windows 7?

.

1. Yes correct
2. Connect a display if you have to see anything before the OS starts. Not very often this happens

ARD - Apple Remote Desktop - the "server" has been installed in Mac OS X and Mac OS X Server by default since around 2003

The "server" (providing the connection for the controlling software) in all Mac OS X computers, the controlling software is Apple Remote Desktop and since 10.5 you can also use the built in VNC client for "lite" remote control.

I have used another software called TeamViewer controlling servers with the iPad but this calls for the software to be started on the computer to be controlled. Apples ARD server starts by default before the user logs in.
post #222 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwatson View Post

'xactly. They have tons of cash to address the corporate market seriously for a change, and they shrink away. This move is a CLEAR indicator of Apple's direction, and I think it's a phenomenal mistake that will come back to kill them.

BTW, for those of you who think a Mac Pro or Mac Mini can work as a server, get out of your living room and come visit a server farm. Not even close.

This goes hand-in-hand with Apple's DC - if they won't use their own servers in it, they sure as hell won't sell any to enterprises.

I said 'fail' last post.. I'm upgrading to 'Epic F...ing Fail' too!

Well, Apple is doing very well in the consumer space, but I do see that people are missing the news that Android and now Microsoft's Windows Mobile are gaining popularity at a faster rate than Apple's products are and if Apple slips up and loses marketshare, after alienating yet another portion of their customers, they might well very much regret having left the server space.

My company decided tonight that we're going to move our entire design company over to Windows, server and clients. We're aware of the problems and pains of Windows deployments but we simply can't rationally go through yet another Apple enforced hardware/software change.

It pains us terribly to do this, but Apple just doesn't seem to value its long term customers whereas Microsoft and even Adobe certainly do.
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post #223 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by pondosinatra View Post

Bingo. Apple used to actually give a crap about their consumers because with their small market share and the beating they were taking at the hands of Intel/MS they had to. People held them to a higher standard. Now with them moving to be the next Sony they just don't give a crap - "Hey you over there! look at the pretty lights!"

Apple + very modest installed user base of Xserves: robust, forward looking computer company of serious adults with a legitimate toe-hold in the enterprise and track record of excellent customer service.

Apple - very modest installed user base of Xserves: puerile toy company of capricious children who have nothing but contempt for their woefully misdirected customers and who shortly plan to cease production of everything but glorified Tamagotchi.

Christ, what a bunch of fucking lunatics.
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post #224 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by theolein View Post

Well, Apple is doing very well in the consumer space, but I do see that people are missing the news that Android and now Microsoft's Windows Mobile are gaining popularity at a faster rate than Apple's products are and if Apple slips up and loses marketshare, after alienating yet another portion of their customers, they might well very much regret having left the server space.

Every disapproving comment on this decision by Apple seems to carry the unspoken assumption that Apple had/has a very large number of customers using, buying and asking for this product. I suspect this assumption is incorrect and, thus, the arguments built upon this edifice crumble when the truth of this assumption vanishes.

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post #225 of 333
I doubt we've heard all of this story yet. Combined with Apple's recent discontinuation of Java distribution, this may point to some sort of new alliance with Oracle/Sun. What if that big North Carolina data center was full of Sun boxes running a version of OS X server. Once its capabilities are established Oracle/Sun could ultimately distribute licensed versions of it to enterprise customers within their sphere of influence, probably reaching customers more easily than Apple. Apple could achieve better sales of OS X server software without the burden of actually having to manufacture the hardware. Among other things Oracle would benefit by Apple becoming a rather large customer. The collaboration would probably have other benefits for each as well.

(I can just hear Steve now: "Oh by the way, we've been running OS X server on all these Sun boxes in our data center for a while now and the performance is just remarkable. We think IT departments are really going to want this.")

The recent Apple/Unisys deal seems similar, but on its face is more about advancing mobile (iPhone, iPad, Powerbook) to the enterprise, a market where Oracle/Sun has no competing products.

So let's wait and see what Steve and Larry are up to. This is an area where they could partner to advance both their causes.
post #226 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

That's very kind. Thank you.

It seemed neat at first but, yes, odd. Apple has definitely changed since that time. They recognize this and are adjusting accordingly.

Exactly! Just like every other large (Fortune 500 or 1000) corporation. I don't know why people don't get this. Fundamentally this is an issue of comparative advantage. These other companies have a comparative advantage in creating, delivering, maintaining and selling enterprise systems. This is not Apple's core competency. Apple's management is being very wise in recognizing their core competencies and focusing on those. Enterprise and data center servers are not it.

Apple is a consumer electronics company. Let's accept this fact. They do it incredibly well. Could their skills in making life easier also be applied to the corporate IT arena? Sure. But nobody in that arena really cares. I work in IT and this is my experience. Sad? Sure. True? Mostly.

It seems this is another good case of people seeing some trees but not the forest.

As you said, Apple will continue to offer the server on Mac Pro and Mini for small businesses, but what's the server market like for companies that do $100 million or more per year in revenues? At that point, something like IBM's AS/400 can more than do the job for in-house app development and scale up to much higher volume levels as the company grows. Or Wintel or Linux or low-end Solaris servers can do just as well at lower cost with "off-the-shelf" third party apps.

It's funny that some people imagine Apple's internal IT departments and data centers having rooms full of X-Serves powered by the OS X Server. It couldn't be further from the truth. Apple will soon become a $100 billion company in annual revenues. This is serious high-volume business and their internal systems wouldn't look much different from those of Exxon, Walmart, GM, Chevron, Ford, AT&T, GE, Verizon, Bank of America, and other mega $100 billion+ corporations. That generally means IBM, HP, Oracle/Sun and SAP. But it's obvious Apple wouldn't be buying servers from HP and Dell!

Also, when companies are that large, it's important to not put everything in one basket. Jobs and Ellison may be buddies but Apple will use ERP systems that make the most sense for Apple and they are using SAP, not Oracle's E-Business Suite although it seems obvious that Apple is using Oracle's database. And it's quite apparent that Apple also does its own custom enterprise-scale UNIX development along with AIX, Solaris, Linux, and Apache. Sorry, but OS X Server and FileMaker just won't do for the size that Apple is.

And I really wonder if Oracle knows what it's doing with Sun. And I'm sure glad that Apple didn't buy Sun and try to get into that business when Sun got crushed in the middle by high-end IBM mainframes/AIX servers and HP/UX servers from the top and by dirt cheap Wintel and Linux servers from the bottom by the likes of Dell, HP and other generic server makers. The server market has become like the worlds of Windows PC's and Android phones - a vast horizontal sea of commodity modular gear from dozens of manufacturers and DIY kits.

Apple will focus on what they do best and what the brand represents - consumer electronics with increasingly thin yet powerful and stylish mobile clients that access info, rich content, apps and services from the cloud. Apple shouldn't be in the business of providing the mega engines (farms of servers and storage) and plumbing pipes (networking equipment) pushing that stuff out but they will manage the cloud itself (like the NC data center). Much more money to be made elsewhere than doing all that grunt work!
post #227 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhartt View Post

I doubt we've heard all of this story yet. Combined with Apple's recent discontinuation of Java distribution, this may point to some sort of new alliance with Oracle/Sun. What if that big North Carolina data center was full of Sun boxes running a version of OS X server. Once its capabilities are established Oracle/Sun could ultimately distribute licensed versions of it to enterprise customers within their sphere of influence, probably reaching customers more easily than Apple. Apple could achieve better sales of OS X server software without the burden of actually having to manufacture the hardware. Among other things Oracle would benefit by Apple becoming a rather large customer. The collaboration would probably have other benefits for each as well.

(I can just hear Steve now: "Oh by the way, we've been running OS X server on all these Sun boxes in our data center for a while now and the performance is just remarkable. We think IT departments are really going to want this.")

The recent Apple/Unisys deal seems similar, but on its face is more about advancing mobile (iPhone, iPad, Powerbook) to the enterprise, a market where Oracle/Sun has no competing products.

So let's wait and see what Steve and Larry are up to. This is an area where they could partner to advance both their causes.

Here are some typical IT job listings at Apple's site for both their HQ and the data center in NC:

http://jobs.apple.com/index.ajs?BID=...&CurrentPage=8

http://jobs.apple.com/index.ajs?BID=...&CurrentPage=8

http://jobs.apple.com/index.ajs?BID=...&CurrentPage=8

For SAP specialists:

http://jobs.apple.com/index.ajs?BID=...&CurrentPage=6

http://jobs.apple.com/index.ajs?BID=...&CurrentPage=6

http://jobs.apple.com/index.ajs?BID=...&CurrentPage=7

Even a Windows specialist at the new NC data center:

http://jobs.apple.com/index.ajs?BID=...CurrentPage=11
post #228 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexkhan2000 View Post

Here are some typical IT job listings at Apple's site for both their HQ and the data center in NC:
[]

Nice list.
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post #229 of 333
This move really makes me nervous.

I use OSX server on a MM so I'm not directly affected, but Apple's commitment to OSX server is now a concern in my mind. People can say I'm fretting over nothing but lets be honest, Apple are waaay more committed to iOS devices than Macs and Apple is a company that has no qualms about abandoning segments of its customer base if it sees greener pastures elsewhere.

IMO, a strength of Apple is that it offers a product that spans from home to office and from the desktop to mobile devices. No one can match that scope besides MS. This move only seems to weaken that scope and advantage.
post #230 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by wooster101 View Post

1. Yes correct
2. Connect a display if you have to see anything before the OS starts. Not very often this happens

ARD - Apple Remote Desktop - the "server" has been installed in Mac OS X and Mac OS X Server by default since around 2003

The "server" (providing the connection for the controlling software) in all Mac OS X computers, the controlling software is Apple Remote Desktop and since 10.5 you can also use the built in VNC client for "lite" remote control.

I have used another software called TeamViewer controlling servers with the iPad but this calls for the software to be started on the computer to be controlled. Apples ARD server starts by default before the user logs in.

Ahh... Thanks.

I am familiar with ARD, and use Screen Sharing to control other Macs (some headless0 to update software, reboot, etc.

In fact I am entering this from the iPad VNDd to an iMac. I even rebooted, and re-logged in via VNC (took 2 sessions)

Enough of that!


I guess I [basically] understand what goes on in the Apple OS X world!


What about server farms running other OSes:

!) I see all those KVM switches -- are they ever used?

2) Are other OSes accessible after boot, before login?

3) if so what software do they use on the server? On the laptop or iPad?

4) Do you try to recover in place or just assume the server is failing and take it offline for component replacement repair?

TIA

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post #231 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by backtomac View Post

This move really makes me nervous.

I use OSX server on a MM so I'm not directly affected, but Apple's commitment to OSX server is now a concern in my mind. People can say I'm fretting over nothing but lets be honest, Apple are waaay more committed to iOS devices than Macs and Apple is a company that has no qualms about abandoning segments of its customer base if it sees greener pastures elsewhere.

IMO, a strength of Apple is that it offers a product that spans from home to office and from the desktop to mobile devices. No one can match that scope besides MS. This move only seems to weaken that scope and advantage.

Honestly, you are fretting over nothing. Apple is dropping Xserve, something that was assumed to eventually occur after they stopped making Xserve RAID and replaced it with Promise VTrak. They simply aren’t focused on the Enterprise nor should they be as they can’t compete at that level until they choose to license their OS to other HW vendors, unless they don’t want to make desktops, but compete directly with IBM et al. It’s really that simple.

These are rack servers, these aren’t part of Apple’s primary business: consumer sales. You can’t buy them in Apple Stores. I’d say anout half the Apple Stores I’ve been in are are devoted to Macs.

On top of that they just had a Mac event that shows Apple’s consumer PC business is not only strong, but financially dominate [among the PC industry in regards to profit]. It’s a huge chunk of their revenue and profit per quarter that would tank the stock if dropped. But why would they when it’s growing faster than the industry? They sell more Macs in a quarter than then they did for an entire year about 3 years ago, if I recall correctly.

They also demoed a new Mac OS X that will bring many of the iOS innovations that made it popular back to the Mac. It should be crystal clear they are doing all this to increase the crossover from iDevice to Mac by bringing the ease-of-use and familiarity of iOS to the Mac OS X. I bet you’ll see a lot more integration that makes the Mac even more indispensable to the iDevice user.
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post #232 of 333
corrected
post #233 of 333
. . .
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #234 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhartt View Post

I doubt we've heard all of this story yet. Combined with Apple's recent discontinuation of Java distribution, this may point to some sort of new alliance with Oracle/Sun. What if that big North Carolina data center was full of Sun boxes running a version of OS X server. Once its capabilities are established Oracle/Sun could ultimately distribute licensed versions of it to enterprise customers within their sphere of influence, probably reaching customers more easily than Apple. Apple could achieve better sales of OS X server software without the burden of actually having to manufacture the hardware. Among other things Oracle would benefit by Apple becoming a rather large customer. The collaboration would probably have other benefits for each as well.

(I can just hear Steve now: "Oh by the way, we've been running OS X server on all these Sun boxes in our data center for a while now and the performance is just remarkable. We think IT departments are really going to want this.")

The recent Apple/Unisys deal seems similar, but on its face is more about advancing mobile (iPhone, iPad, Powerbook) to the enterprise, a market where Oracle/Sun has no competing products.

So let's wait and see what Steve and Larry are up to. This is an area where they could partner to advance both their causes.

Good points!

Larry also likes thin clients -- maybe even mobile thin clients...

...Er, Ah... Agile clients!

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post #235 of 333
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Originally Posted by Market_Player View Post

Spot on mate, I was thinking the same thing exactly



Could not agree with you more, the MacPro belongs under a desk and not in a server hall.

We ( the company I work for ) recently installed 250 Xserves for a mission critical project in the Oil Sands of Alberta; we could not be happier with the results.

Security of the OS is second to non right now, and the labour cost was cut 77% after replacing Windows Server and our systems have been on an unprecedented 100% up time from where we were before.

I sure hope that Apple will licence out OS X Server after this fiasco is over with.

What company are you working for?
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post #236 of 333
wow 6 pages. I finally made to this point in the thread.

Apple will probably use very traditional hardware and software in the new data center. My guess is 80% IBM or HP blades. 20% or less Macs. All storage will be SAN, mostly iSCSI and some fiber.

For server software the blades will be running mostly RedHat Linux with some Windows and even a little Solaris. Macs, OS X. Nothing radical, just good solid infrastructure.

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post #237 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

wow 6 pages. I finally made to this point in the thread.

Apple will probably use very traditional hardware and software in the new data center. My guess is 80% IBM or HP blades. 20% or less Macs. All storage will be SAN, mostly iSCSI and some fiber.

For server software the blades will be running mostly RedHat Linux with some Windows and even a little Solaris. Macs, OS X. Nothing radical, just good solid infrastructure.

That sounds exactly like the Apple I've observed for 32 years...

... remember the day in 1979, watching an Apple employee walking out of Bandley 3 (AIR) with a removable IBM (MayTag) Disk Drive cartridge under his arm...

... to the day in the mid 80s when they got their Cray.

Apple knows which businesses it is in and which business it is not in!

For their IT needs Apple will get the best that money can buy!

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No way will Apple bet the farm on their server farm!

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post #238 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

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What rill they use in Apple server farms?

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Well.. Since everyone and their brother who wants to 'check out' OS X on non-Apple hardware can all pretty much get it working I'm quite sure Apple can utilize any rackable server they like and install OS X on it... After all the EULA is only for the lusers not Steve himself..
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post #239 of 333
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Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

On top of that they just had a Mac event that shows Apples consumer PC business is not only strong, but financially dominate [among the PC industry in regards to profit]. Its a huge chunk of their revenue and profit per quarter that would tank the stock if dropped. But why would they when its growing faster than the industry? They sell more Macs in a quarter than then they did for an entire year about 3 years ago, if I recall correctly.

They also demoed a new Mac OS X that will bring many of the iOS innovations that made it popular back to the Mac. It should be crystal clear they are doing all this to increase the crossover from iDevice to Mac by bringing the ease-of-use and familiarity of iOS to the Mac OS X. I bet youll see a lot more integration that makes the Mac even more indispensable to the iDevice user.

I know that the Mac consumer business is strong. Hoe does that re-afffirm Apple's commitment to OSX Server?

As someone who's brought Macs into their business this move is a bit unsettling.
post #240 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by backtomac View Post

I know that the Mac consumer business is strong. Hoe does that re-afffirm Apple's commitment to OSX Server?

As someone who's brought Macs into their business this move is a bit unsettling.

You’re right, you did start off mentioning OS X Server, but midway in the 2nd paragraph you stated "Apple are waaay more committed to iOS devices than Macs” which made me think you were implying Macs were at risk of “abandoning”, not OS X Server. If that isn’t what you meant then I retract my statement.
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