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Consumer Reports declares Apple's new MacBook Air top of class

post #1 of 53
Thread Starter 
Consumer Reports, the organization that caused a stir by not recommending Apple's iPhone 4 due to alleged antenna issues, has taken the opposite stance on the new MacBook Air, giving it top honors.

The consumer advocacy group this week revealed that the new 11.6-inch $999 MacBook Air and its larger 13.3-inch model are the best notebooks in their respective classes. Access to the full report, including scores, requires a subscription.

Digital Daily revealed that the new 11-inch MacBook Air earned a score of 67 points out of 100. That was well beyond the next highest ranked notebook, the Toshiba Satellite, which garnered 51 points.

The larger, more powerful 13-inch MacBook Air earned 78 points, edging the 76 points assigned to the Toshiba Portege. Consumer Reports reportedly found the performance, display and ergonomics of both new MacBook Air models to be the best features on the thin-and-light notebooks.

On the negative side of Apple's new ultraportables, Consumer Reports said the versatility of both models is "fair," while the speakers on the 11-inch model were said to be substandard. The new MacBook Airs were also dinged for their prices, which came in more than double that of their competitors' comparatively less-powerful hardware.

The MacBook Air's high marks from Consumer Reports are a stark contrast from the iPhone 4 controversy earlier this year, when the publication reversed its initial recommendation of the iPhone 4. The company conducted independent testing in a controlled environment, where it found that the iPhone 4 was subject to signal loss when held improperly.

Despite its change of stance, the organization still ranked the iPhone as the best smartphone available. The company also criticized Apple for ending its free case program for new iPhone 4 buyers, suggesting that the Cupertino, Calif., company was "putting the onus" of a "design flaw" on consumers.

For more, see AppleInsider's own positive take on the new 11.6-inch and 13.3-inch MacBook Air models in our extensive review, published in October. Readers can also find significant discounts on the new notebooks in the AppleInsider Mac Pricing Matrix, included below:

post #2 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

... The consumer advocacy group this week revealed that the new 11.6-inch $999 MacBook Air and its larger 13.3-inch model are the best notebooks in their respective classes. Access to the full report, including scores, requires a subscription. ...

Aren't they the only notebooks in their "respective classes"?
post #3 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Aren't they the only notebooks in their "respective classes"?


"The new MacBook Airs were also dinged for their prices, which came in more than double that of their competitors' comparatively less-powerful hardware."

imo that sounds like the netbook class to me. Macbook Air are much expensive but they dont run on intel Atom cpu's and the 320m graphics is not even in the same league as netbook graphic.
post #4 of 53
It's Consumer Reports again... Who cares?
post #5 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Landcruiser View Post

It's Consumer Reports again... Who cares?

Well, yes, that was sort of my point, CR doesn't even understand the nature of what they are reviewing.
post #6 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Landcruiser View Post

It's Consumer Reports again... Who cares?

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Well, yes, that was sort of my point, CR doesn't even understand the nature of what they are reviewing.

I'd say - just let's love CR again!
post #7 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

"The new MacBook Airs were also dinged for their prices, which came in more than double that of their competitors' comparatively less-powerful hardware."

imo that sounds like the netbook class to me. Macbook Air are much expensive but they dont run on intel Atom cpu's and the 320m graphics is not even in the same league as netbook graphic.

Well, the Toshiba Portege is not a netbook, but it's not half the price of an Air (the 12" is ~$1300), nor is it at all comparable to the Air in any way. So, basically, it would seem that CR just lumped a bunch of totally dissimilar computers into a "class" convenient for their review process.
post #8 of 53
Flip, meet flop. You guys should get together

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #9 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The new MacBook Airs were also dinged for their prices, which came in more than double that of their competitors' comparatively less-powerful hardware.

I came from being a fan of Vaio laptops, to owning my first Apple notebook (1st gen MBA), to now waiting for my new 13" MBA to arrive in the mail to replace my trusty 1st gen MBA.

Consumer reports - like many Apple bashers - that continue to criticize Apple's MBA solely on the basis of price simply do not get it, and from the sound of it, will never truly understand.

While all the Vaio's I've owned in the past were great machines, NONE of them, including all the current crop of Window's notebooks come even close the to fit, finish, high-quality construction, and attention-to-detail that Apple places on their notebooks. Couple that with OSX and the machines become more of the tools that they are supposed to be compared to their competitors.

There's a reason that the MBA's cost more. I appreciate my current MBA every day I use it considering the abuse I give it in my very-mobile professional occupation. My Vaio laptops would begin to start cracking (as all plastic laptops do) within a year of purchase due to the environments I have to put them through each day.
post #10 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Landcruiser View Post

It's Consumer Reports again... Who cares?

Exactly. Why even bring up CR?
They should be rating condoms or handguns or dishwashers or something. Leave computers to computer & technology mags. Seriously.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #11 of 53
My opinion of CR has nothing to do with whether they bash Apple or not. I mean, you might as well ask Cosmopolitan to review the MacBook Air.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #12 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Exactly. Why even bring up CR?
They should be rating condoms or handguns or dishwashers or something. Leave computers to computer & technology mags. Seriously.

I don't think there are really any products they understand. Certainly none that I've ever had any knowledge of.

EDIT: So, it seems their "categories" are based strictly on screen size, as though all computers with a certain screen size are basically the same, and as though that's the most relevant factor in choosing a computer. Makes it even more ridiculous that they discuss price as a factor.
post #13 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

My opinion of CR has nothing to do with whether they bash Apple or not. I mean, you might as well ask Cosmopolitan to review the MacBook Air.

Cosmo would be more likely to do an article titled, "10 Things Your Boyfriend Wants To Do With Your MacBook Air (And Why You Should Let Him)"
post #14 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Exactly. Why even bring up CR?
They should be rating condoms or handguns or dishwashers or something. Leave computers to computer & technology mags. Seriously.

Rating condoms? Great job.
I don't know who checks CR but they did list both the 11 and 13" MBA's as the best, so its not all bad. What I find interesting is that they came in at number one yet they only scored 67 and 78 out of 100 respectively. Mostly things are judged by today's standard i.e. the best available today would score top grade, but CR must have created a metric based upon goals not yet technically achievable. I wonder if one day when this imagined standard is achieved - you know, the 300 gram 15" super fast laptop with a one week battery - if then this amazing machine will score 100, or if the standard will move with the times and it will still only score 75?
post #15 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Rating condoms? Great job.
I don't know who checks CR but they did list both the 11 and 13" MBA's as the best, so its not all bad. What I find interesting is that they came in at number one yet they only scored 67 and 78 out of 100 respectively. Mostly things are judged by today's standard i.e. the best available today would score top grade, but CR must have created a metric based upon goals not yet technically achievable. I wonder if one day when this imagined standard is achieved - you know, the 300 gram 15" super fast laptop with a one week battery - if then this amazing machine will score 100, or if the standard will move with the times and it will still only score 75?

Well, it doesn't necessarily work like that. They probably rate a max number of points for a bunch of individual factors. So, if you rated "excellent" in all factors, you would get a 100.

Of course, if one of those things is a DVD drive, worth, say, 5 points for excellent, does the MBA get 0 because it doesn't have one, or 5 because the best DVD drive is the one you don't have to carry around with you. Likewise, if they rate Ethernet performance. And so on, and so on.

And, how can you say that the 13" MBA is objectively better than the 13" MBP? Doesn't it depend on how you intend to use it -- i.e., a bunch of subjective factors that they can't possibly capture?

This is the basic problem with CR reviews. They break things down into arbitrary factors that may or may not be relevant to you, to someone else, to anyone, and then pretend they are doing Scientific ratings of products. In reality, all they really do with any product, in the best case, is provide reviews that reflect what the reviewer thought was important (which is often very much at odds with what a knowledgeable user would consider important) and which one he would have picked. Their reviews amount to nothing more than rationalizations of their reviewers biases, masquerading as objective fact.
post #16 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Consumer Reports, the organization that caused a stir by not recommending Apple's iPhone 4 due to alleged antenna issues, has taken the opposite stance on the ne][/c]



Consumer Reports has no credibility whatsoever.
post #17 of 53
A not-surprising, really useless evaluation from Consumer Reports. But its interesting to consider the nature of the failure.

As I see it, there are two ways to review a computer. One is functionality. In this case, you take an individual's needs and see how the device measures up in terms of cost and performance. For example, from a student's perspective, how good is a Macbook air? How does it compare to other computers that might fulfill a student's needs?

Or you could analyze the device on a components perspective. Consider things like the size of screen, or solid-state drive, and see how the design choices affect overall cost-performance functions.

But consumer reports does neither. It lumps computers based on an almost irrelevant criterion, screen size, and then tries to compare them. While screen size is important, its one of about 10 things that might put a computer in a particular class.

Statements like "the macbook air is expensive" and "hard drive capacity is small" are just silly. The principal reason that the macbook air is 'expensive' and "hard drive capacity is small" is that Apple chose to use solid-state components to replace the hard drive. This was a clear design decision based on costs and benefits. But consumer writes as if Apple chose to make a computer with high cost and small hard drive independent of the trade offs. As if it were a marketing decision.

So, its not just that the writers are incompetent. Its also that the structure of the article, the structure of comparison, is idiotic.
post #18 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Landcruiser View Post

It's Consumer Reports again... Who cares?

I care. They have a reputation for providing unbiased and honest reports.


Edit: I will add that I got to use a new 13" MacBook Air a couple of days ago and I really think it is one of the best products I've seen from Apple. Once I picked it up in comparison to the other bulkier MacBooks I really wanted one. The downsides for me were: no antiglare option, high price. The 2GB default configuration also leaves a bad impression with me, I know that Apple could provide 4GB as default across their entire product line without much of a hit to their bottom line.
post #19 of 53
A little off-topic, but I'm super happy with my new 13" MBA that replaced my MBA 1,1.

I have to mention the devastating disappointment that hit me the other day, though . . .

WHERE IS MY BACKLIT KEYBOARD???

Why on earth would Apple remove that?
Journalism is publishing what someone doesn't want us to know; the rest is propaganda.
-Horacio Verbitsky (el perro), journalist (b. 1942)
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Journalism is publishing what someone doesn't want us to know; the rest is propaganda.
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post #20 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Well, it doesn't necessarily work like that. They probably rate a max number of points for a bunch of individual factors. So, if you rated "excellent" in all factors, you would get a 100.

Of course, if one of those things is a DVD drive, worth, say, 5 points for excellent, does the MBA get 0 because it doesn't have one, or 5 because the best DVD drive is the one you don't have to carry around with you. Likewise, if they rate Ethernet performance. And so on, and so on.

Hence my comment - The only machine that would score a universally high score is one that cannot be made.
Quote:
And, how can you say that the 13" MBA is objectively better than the 13" MBP? Doesn't it depend on how you intend to use it -- i.e., a bunch of subjective factors that they can't possibly capture?

Totally agree. Unfortunately CR does not stand alone. AI has on many occasions detracted points from a product for ridiculous reasons that the product just was never designed to do. I can't be bothered to back that up as most people here will be familiar
Quote:
This is the basic problem with CR reviews. They break things down into arbitrary factors that may or may not be relevant to you, to someone else, to anyone, and then pretend they are doing Scientific ratings of products. In reality, all they really do with any product, in the best case, is provide reviews that reflect what the reviewer thought was important (which is often very much at odds with what a knowledgeable user would consider important) and which one he would have picked. Their reviews amount to nothing more than rationalizations of their reviewers biases, masquerading as objective fact.

It is fine to break things down factually. It is OK to say that the MBA 11" has a small screen and is not suitable as primary PS workhorse. What is wrong is to attach value to that observation. Making such bleeding obvious statements does not intelligent reviews make, however.
post #21 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Well, yes, that was sort of my point, CR doesn't even understand the nature of what they are reviewing.

There are 100s of ways you might categorize computers. CR picked one. Read the article. If they picked screen size, fine, go with it. That's probably a top criteria for most people buying computers, so it's legit.

That's not to say that CR knows everything about everything. For example, they are a useful reference for selecting a point-and-shoot camera. But when it comes to DSLRs I look elsewhere, because then it really depends on what you are going to use your camera for.

For the general consumer (ie, nobody on this board ), screen size is as good as any spec to base your groupings on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

Consumer reports - like many Apple bashers...

Actually, CR rates Apple's products quite favorably, and always points out Apple's superior service, support, and reliability. iPhone 4 is the only Apple product in recent memory that they severely criticized, and yet they still rated it the top smartphone. I believe they rate products independent of price, but then include price when making their recommendations (ie, a lower rated product gets the recommendation because it's also lower priced, so the reader can decided if a higher rated option is worth the extra price).

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Rating condoms? Great job.
I don't know who checks CR but they did list both the 11 and 13" MBA's as the best, so its not all bad. What I find interesting is that they came in at number one yet they only scored 67 and 78 out of 100 respectively. Mostly things are judged by today's standard i.e. the best available today would score top grade, but CR must have created a metric based upon goals not yet technically achievable. I wonder if one day when this imagined standard is achieved - you know, the 300 gram 15" super fast laptop with a one week battery - if then this amazing machine will score 100, or if the standard will move with the times and it will still only score 75?

Haven't ever developed a scoring matrix before, have you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Totally agree. Unfortunately CR does not stand alone. AI has on many occasions detracted points from a product for ridiculous reasons that the product just was never designed to do.

So what, you created a scorecard that only addresses what a product was designed to do? Are you going to create a different scorecard for every device, because there are no two devices that have the exact same design goals?

If you are going to create a comparison, you need a common scorecard. Otherwise you might as well just list the specs and not try to compare two devices. It's not as if they only give you the final score. The results of each category are shown in the reviews. So you can decided which categories are more important to you. You might as well bash MacWorld (and probably every other publication), because all they do is give you an overall score on a 5 mice rating scale. How did they arrive at the rating?

PS: Why all the hatred? Consumer Reports is targeted at the general consumer. Not the techno geeks here. Talk about rating something based on what it was designed to do. How about rating CR based on what IT was designed to do.
post #22 of 53
[QUOTE=Steve-J;1749867]Consumer Reports has no credibility whatsoever.[/QUOTE

because it doesn't give glowing reviews to Apple.

I'm kiddin' - how about areason or are you simply a 2 year old?

Originally Posted by Rickers - 2014

Cook & Co will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost for so long.  Steve == Apple and Apple == Steve.  

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Originally Posted by Rickers - 2014

Cook & Co will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost for so long.  Steve == Apple and Apple == Steve.  

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post #23 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

"The new MacBook Airs were also dinged for their prices, which came in more than double that of their competitors' comparatively less-powerful hardware."

imo that sounds like the netbook class to me. Macbook Air are much expensive but they dont run on intel Atom cpu's and the 320m graphics is not even in the same league as netbook graphic.

It sounds like its being compared to netbooks, but nothing in that statement or in the specs for the MBAs is netbook-class.

Lets start with the biggest issue, the CPU and GPU sans any MoBo, which cost more wholesale (per 1ku) as most netbooks. Then there is the size of the keyboard. Its not about quality of design or components, as there are very expensive netbooks out there, but they use Atom processors with graphic cards much worse than the original MBA had. These are ultra-light or ultra-portable notebooks.

Why do I classify these machine types this way? Because they were born out of Intels creation of the Atom CPU which brought forth the ability for vendors to make small AND cheap notebooks, later called netbooks because that is the only thing their size and performance allowed.

Note, you can make a small laptop with a cramped keyboard and cheap materials but it will cost at least $250 more than the average netbook simply because of the aforementioned CPU and GPU cost. For that reason alone you simply wont see such a crap machine built around such premium HW. It makes no sense at all, at leas the $1,300 Vaio X with its Atom CPU and GM500 IGP makes a little sense from a market perspective.
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post #24 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

So what, you created a scorecard that only addresses what a product was designed to do? Are you going to create a different scorecard for every device, because there are no two devices that have the exact same design goals?

If you are going to create a comparison, you need a common scorecard. Otherwise you might as well just list the specs and not try to compare two devices.

A score card tends to be a silly metric for devices designed to do so many different things. But my point was that it is ridiculous to give an otherwise perfect cordless mouse 4.5 stars because it requires the user to change batteries, or detract points from a netbook because it performs badly with Photoshop, or if you like drop the overall score of a Testarossa because it is crap off road. So if you must have a scorecard it must be one designed to measure the merits of a device within its practical scope of operation.
post #25 of 53
The MBA scores are not exactly in stark contrast to the scores given the iPHone 4.

As you said both are given high scores. It's just that they found the iPHOne 4 has worse than average reception issues and thus couldn't recommend it.
post #26 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

A score card tends to be a silly metric for devices designed to do so many different things. But my point was that it is ridiculous to give an otherwise perfect cordless mouse 4.5 stars because it requires the user to change batteries, or detract points from a netbook because it performs badly with Photoshop, or if you like drop the overall score of a Testarossa because it is crap off road. So if you must have a scorecard it must be one designed to measure the merits of a device within its practical scope of operation.

No, your point was that that top product should have a score of 100. As if it was that single product was the perfect embodiment of every criteria. What if one mouse has longer batter life but another was more ergonomic. Which one would you give the perfect score to?
post #27 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldenclaw View Post

I care. They have a reputation for providing unbiased and honest reports.


Edit: I will add that I got to use a new 13" MacBook Air a couple of days ago and I really think it is one of the best products I've seen from Apple. Once I picked it up in comparison to the other bulkier MacBooks I really wanted one. The downsides for me were: no antiglare option, high price. The 2GB default configuration also leaves a bad impression with me, I know that Apple could provide 4GB as default across their entire product line without much of a hit to their bottom line.

"Unbiased"? It took me many years to figure out that everyone is biased: there is no such thing as "unbiased". You have to start with basic expectations, assumptions, and beliefs. That is your bias. Not to be pedantic about it, but everyone is biased.

And yes, the 13" Air is pretty fscking amazing

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post #28 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

A score card tends to be a silly metric for devices designed to do so many different things. But my point was that it is ridiculous to give an otherwise perfect cordless mouse 4.5 stars because it requires the user to change batteries, or detract points from a netbook because it performs badly with Photoshop, or if you like drop the overall score of a Testarossa because it is crap off road. So if you must have a scorecard it must be one designed to measure the merits of a device within its practical scope of operation.

You might as well give everyone 100% since their score card will be suited for that specific device.

Let's take cars for example.

You say a sports car should be rated on the performance on track.
An offroad truck should be rated on the performance off road.

What about for every day tasks? There needs to be a general scorecard in order to address that issue. Thus neither the sports car or the offroad truck would score 100% on the general scorecard.
post #29 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

No, your point was that that top product should have a score of 100. As if it was that single product was the perfect embodiment of every criteria. What if one mouse has longer batter life but another was more ergonomic. Which one would you give the perfect score to?

No, my point was that you can't have one set of criteria for all types of computers. Not even all kinds of laptops. My secondary point was that criticizing a device for something it was not intended for is somewhat pointless.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FurbiesAndBeans View Post

You might as well give everyone 100% since their score card will be suited for that specific device.

Let's take cars for example.

You say a sports car should be rated on the performance on track.
An offroad truck should be rated on the performance off road.

What about for every day tasks? There needs to be a general scorecard in order to address that issue. Thus neither the sports car or the offroad truck would score 100% on the general scorecard.

I don't see why there needs to be a general scorecard. By your measure both cars would get a mediocre score. If you have two sports cars by all means use the 'every day' measure, why use the off road measure at all? And to judge a sports car and and off roader by the same criteria is meaningless.
post #30 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Cosmo would be more likely to do an article titled, "10 Things Your Boyfriend Wants To Do With Your MacBook Air (And Why You Should Let Him)"

HAAAA

love it
post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Cosmo would be more likely to do an article titled, "10 Things Your Boyfriend Wants To Do With Your MacBook Air (And Why You Should Let Him)"

Post OF THE WEEK
post #32 of 53
I almost bought a MBA 11" on the spot when I was in the Apple store a week or two ago. I think it, and also the 13" version, are certainly worth their money. But I will still go for the 13" MBP when my 15" MBP has died. That one is still the best computer for me at the moment.
post #33 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

No, my point was that you can't have one set of criteria for all types of computers. Not even all kinds of laptops. My secondary point was that criticizing a device for something it was not intended for is somewhat pointless.


I don't see why there needs to be a general scorecard. By your measure both cars would get a mediocre score. If you have two sports cars by all means use the 'every day' measure, why use the off road measure at all? And to judge a sports car and and off roader by the same criteria is meaningless.

Because not everyone knows exactly they want. Some people (yes i know quite a few actually) only care about getting from point A to point B. So if for example the truck offered better MPG than the sports car, they would go with the truck.
post #34 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by FurbiesAndBeans View Post

Because not everyone knows exactly they want. Some people (yes i know quite a few actually) only care about getting from point A to point B. So if for example the truck offered better MPG than the sports car, they would go with the truck.

So put it in the review but don't use it in a score sheet. This iMac scores 75/100 because you need to plug it in at the airport... silly. But for the ones who have no idea what they want by all means tell them that the imac is not a good choice if you need to travel with your computer.

Re the truck v sports car MPG. That's silly. Your friends would in all likelihood not consider buying a truck. Nor a sports car for that matter. Within the 'truck category' MPG is a score-worthy factor, however. As it is within each category.
post #35 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Cosmo would be more likely to do an article titled, "10 Things Your Boyfriend Wants To Do With Your MacBook Air (And Why You Should Let Him)"

LOL! nice.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #36 of 53
Quote:
No, my point was that you can't have one set of criteria for all types of computers. Not even all kinds of laptops. My secondary point was that criticizing a device for something it was not intended for is somewhat pointless.

There has to be some sort of common ground between the laptops compared for any sort of comparison to be meaningful. The MBA is an ultra-portable laptop so the main criteria for comparison purposes would probably be size, weight, durability and battery life. This would be compared to other computers with the same purpose which would probably include netbooks and other ultra-portables. And clearly the price of the MBA can be criticised in comparison to a netbook if the purpose of the machine is to be portable. Both are equally as portable, i.e., they both achieve the same goal, but one is considerably more expensive.
post #37 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrochester View Post

There has to be some sort of common ground between the laptops compared for any sort of comparison to be meaningful. The MBA is an ultra-portable laptop so the main criteria for comparison purposes would probably be size, weight, durability and battery life. This would be compared to other computers with the same purpose which would probably include netbooks and other ultra-portables. And clearly the price of the MBA can be criticised in comparison to a netbook if the purpose of the machine is to be portable. Both are equally as portable, i.e., they both achieve the same goal, but one is considerably more expensive.

Exactly - I would place the small MBA in the netbook / ultraportable bracket.
post #38 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Exactly - I would place the small MBA in the netbook / ultraportable bracket.

Ultraportable notebook and netbook should be 2 different categories.
post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Ultraportable notebook and netbook should be 2 different categories.

Why? They both have the same purpose and utility.
post #40 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrochester View Post

Why? They both have the same purpose and utility.

Same purpose, how? Being a laptop?

No, they dont have the same utility because the either MBA will far outperform any Atom-based netbook in raw computing power.

Thats even before we get into the shrunken keyboard and other cheap components that are pretty much dictated to sell that machine type. Or that the CPU and GPU in the MBAs cost more from Intel per 1k units than most netbooks cost retail.

The bottom line is the MBAs are ultralight ultraportable notebooks, just like all the other ultra-light ultraportable notebooks in its class.
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