or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Review roundup: Samsung's Galaxy Tab, the iPad's first "real" competitor
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Review roundup: Samsung's Galaxy Tab, the iPad's first "real" competitor - Page 3

post #81 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjw View Post

I also believe web browsing is better on any kind of laptop, simply because it is much faster unless all you are doing is clicking links.

I have an iPad (two actually) and a laptop. Nine times out of ten, when I am surfing the web, I actually prefer the iPad, because it's where I want to be and touch navigation is preferable to using a mouse (in my opinion). I suspect that would become ten out of ten if my laptop were a netbook with a cramped vertical viewing space.

Also, my iPad is wicked fast at web browsing. I guess that I don't understand what is "much faster" about web browsing on any kind of laptop.

Thompson
post #82 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

I love how people who have no knowledge of Apple's iPad prototyping process, and most likely no experience with, or understanding of, UI design, speak with such great authority on what they did, could have done, should have done and why they did it. Yeah, just leave a couple of buttons out, that'll do it.

More likely, and based on Jobs' own comments, they tested a whole range of sizes and UIs and found that at 7" you can't get a workable UI that sufficiently improves over a small phone UI to make it worthwhile. At 10", you have enough screen real estate to start to do interesting things that can be manipulated easily with a finger, but can be much richer than a phone UI. There's a threshold effect that requires a certain minimum size to properly accommodate usage. They probably did, during the many years the iPad was in development, make a 7" iPad prototype with a prototype UI, but it wasn't the device they wanted to make, so they didn't make it.

Well then, you are in luck! I do in fact work on systems design and work very closely with our usuability experts (granted, not on mobile device software). I have no doubt that Apple tested a whole range of prototype sizes, and for their goals, 10" probably was the best size.

But the point of my overall post was that it's my opinion that one of Apple's goals was to court the print publishers and that that goal was a primary driver for a larger screen (and all that's conjecture on my part, as I stated). 10" is a great size for that purpose. But absent that business goal, I believe Apple's engineers could have also come up with brilliant software on a smaller device. To suggest otherwise, I believe, is an insult to Apple's engineers.

I'm also not saying Apple should get rid of the 10" iPad. But as they say " 'One size fits all' doesn't."
post #83 of 188
the Galaxy tab is simply a BETA product. it is promising but has a lot of serious problems. consumers should wait for mature Android tablets next year.

that is the plain story these reviewers should be reporting. but no, that is not the spin they want. the spin they want is "competition" and "i'm not an Apple fanboy." so they list the Galaxy's many problems but still deem it "worthy." just expensive.

it isn't worthy. actually, it's half-baked. they do their readers a serious disservice by not telling it like it is, just to cover their ass and hype the "fight!" meme.
post #84 of 188
Can't it look different? Must a tablet look like Apples'?! Do something to the tablet.... either that or the way Ive designed it is just too correct.
post #85 of 188
Any device that puts a permanent back-button anywhere other than the left side of a panel is a dumb device.
post #86 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

... But the point of my overall post was that it's my opinion that one of Apple's goals was to court the print publishers and that that goal was a primary driver for a larger screen (and all that's conjecture on my part, as I stated). 10" is a great size for that purpose. But absent that business goal, I believe Apple's engineers could have also come up with brilliant software on a smaller device. To suggest otherwise, I believe, is an insult to Apple's engineers. ...

I don't think they sit around saying, "I wonder what sizes of tablet we can produce a useable UI for." I think they had a vision (SJ's vision, perhaps) of what it is they wanted a tablet to be (which I don't think was driven solely, or even primarily to control the publishing industry, I think the vision was likely much much broader), what they thought it should be. One thing I think they didn't think it should be is a giant iPod Touch. A 7" screen just isn't, I don't think, big enough to make something that's essentially different from a giant iPod Touch (which is why, at 7", the Samsung Tab is just a giant Android phone, without the phone). I think they discovered that 10" was the optimal size for implementing the vision they had of what it should be, and SJ's public comments related to screen size, I think, bear this out.
post #87 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

I don't think they sit around saying, "I wonder what sizes of tablet we can produce a useable UI for." I think they had a vision (SJ's vision, perhaps) of what it is they wanted a tablet to be (which I don't think was driven solely, or even primarily to control the publishing industry, I think the vision was likely much much broader), what they thought it should be. One thing I think they didn't think it should be is a giant iPod Touch. A 7" screen just isn't, I don't think, big enough to make something that's essentially different from a giant iPod Touch (which is why, at 7", the Samsung Tab is just a giant Android phone, without the phone). I think they discovered that 10" was the optimal size for implementing the vision they had of what it should be, and SJ's public comments related to screen size, I think, bear this out.

there is so much BS dissembling on the size issue. for portable devices, there are three basic size options: pocket size, purse size, and tote bag/case size. for a 7" tab, forget pockets (seriously, who is really going to jam one in). some purses will fit. but most will be carried in some version of a tote thing. or naked in your hand. for 10" tablets, the only real difference is purses don't work, hardly a major target market differentiator. bottom line: if you really need a carry-it-all-the-time-portable, you really need smartphone size. which is why the iPod touch - which really IS a tablet of course - sells so well. Apple figured that out 3 years ago. but, needing to transition the iPod into a new future iOS form factor, hyped it as a new kind of iPod instead of a new kind of mini-tablet. that was smart marketing and has totally succeeded - the touch now is about 75% of all iPod sales.
post #88 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Being Flash enabled resulting as a 'weakness' is truly ironic.

Yeah! You have access to the whole web -- if you live that long and/or don't mind rebooting several times.

Instant ON, followed shortly by Instant OFF!

Now, that's what I call productivity!

.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
post #89 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post

Glad you asked. For one, Java runs a Trash Collector that is deeply engrained into the Java code and therefore cannot be deactivated. So it has priority over all instances and therefore will stop any and all actions including the touch framework to resolve pointers and unused variables in memory. Apple has a much better solution than that. Trash collection is a good thing for desktop apps but not mobile apps, it takes way too many resources.

Moreover, Java is not even close to being as stable as Objective-C. I've developed for both platforms.

Ahh... That's very interesting -- the garbage collection priority. Got any links on that?

Also, Java is byteCode interpreted at runtime, No? So that's additional overhead.

.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
post #90 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

A bit of both, plus it's a bear to type on - not just because of the virtual keyboard, but because its curved back makes it wobbly on a table, so the only halfway comfortable way to use it is in my lap.

Apple's iPad case is great to support the iPad at the proper angle for typing and is non-slip!

http://www.apple.com/ipad/accessories/

.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
post #91 of 188
Another review: http://www.macworld.com/reviews/prod...tml?lsrc=top_3

This one is a little more positive about the software. But overall so far, the reviewers seem to like the smaller size option.
post #92 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

OK, based upon your answer, it seems like it's mostly about having a real keyboard. So that leaves me with the question: why are you specifying "Chrome" over "Android" or "Windows" or whatever other OS's will certainly be available on devices that would fit your requirements.

I'm struggling to see what benefits "Chrome" is going to bring to the landscape. Can anyone enlighten me why the consumer needs yet another OS, and why manufacturers should promote it? Looking at tjw's response here, I presume it has something to do with Chrome being more conducive to a "superfast" device. Because it is lightweight (from code footprint standpoint)? Because it can leverage the cloud better than Android or iOS? Note that Apple has done a great job of building an ecosystem upon which applications can run across numerous devices (iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad). This is great for the user and the developer. By promoting Chrome along with Android, isn't Google failing to leverage a similar advantage?

Also, even if the dev tools and compiler reside in the cloud, the super small screen sizes of netbooks would drive me mad if I were doing actual development on them. Is this not something that would bother you, tjw?


Thompson

Sure chrome os will be super fast, that is the main attraction. I also use a lot of google apps. I get my news from google reader, chrome is my browser of choice, my calendar is google calendar and I have a lot of files on google docs. So it is the perfect choice. Everything else is not needed in my situation, so windows and osx are overkill for my mobile computer and android, as a lot of the android tabs prove, is still a phone OS.

Apple's eco system is primarily driven by proprietary formats to lock you into the eco system. It is fantastic for people that are technophobes but gets a little restrictive to the rest of us.

I use linux mainly on a super fast custom pc which also runs windows 7. I also have a macbook pro old version but I just got bored of the inflexibility of it. The whole apple eco-system really does not appeal to me.
post #93 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

I have an iPad (two actually) and a laptop. Nine times out of ten, when I am surfing the web, I actually prefer the iPad, because it's where I want to be and touch navigation is preferable to using a mouse (in my opinion). I suspect that would become ten out of ten if my laptop were a netbook with a cramped vertical viewing space.

Also, my iPad is wicked fast at web browsing. I guess that I don't understand what is "much faster" about web browsing on any kind of laptop.

Thompson

If you know how to use a keyboard properly and you do a lot of google searches or commenting on articles then a keyboard is always faster than the iPad offering.
post #94 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

I don't think they sit around saying, "I wonder what sizes of tablet we can produce a useable UI for." I think they had a vision (SJ's vision, perhaps) of what it is they wanted a tablet to be (which I don't think was driven solely, or even primarily to control the publishing industry, I think the vision was likely much much broader), what they thought it should be. One thing I think they didn't think it should be is a giant iPod Touch. A 7" screen just isn't, I don't think, big enough to make something that's essentially different from a giant iPod Touch (which is why, at 7", the Samsung Tab is just a giant Android phone, without the phone). I think they discovered that 10" was the optimal size for implementing the vision they had of what it should be, and SJ's public comments related to screen size, I think, bear this out.

All fair enough.

I'd point out: buttonless shuffle, removing FW, the Cube, AppleTV, fat nano. I love Apple, but I don't drink the kool-aid. Nobody is right 100% of the time.
post #95 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetim View Post

What does this do that iPad doesn't? Flash doesn't work properly. What's the draw.? What's the killer app? What's the killer feature?

Well for a lot of people the killer feature is simply that it doesn't have an Apple logo.
post #96 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by c4rlob View Post

Any device that puts a permanent back-button anywhere other than the left side of a panel is a dumb device.

Unless it is built for left-handed Hebrews.


Maybe, what's needed is a boustrophedonic back button?

.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
post #97 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

All fair enough.

I'd point out: buttonless shuffle, removing FW, the Cube, AppleTV, fat nano. I love Apple, but I don't drink the kool-aid. Nobody is right 100% of the time.

Yes, but, of course, iPad is not on that list, so your list really has nothing to do with this issue.
post #98 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by piot View Post

Well for a lot of people the killer feature is simply that it doesn't have an Apple logo.

True. I think Android (& Google products and services in general) appeals to the same sort of personality as Microsoft did in the '90s.
post #99 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Apple's iPad case is great to support the iPad at the proper angle for typing and is non-slip!

http://www.apple.com/ipad/accessories/

He's so arrogant -- he claims that his is a fiveskin!

Does that FIVEskin fit the 11" iPad as well?
post #100 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjw View Post

Apple's eco system is primarily driven by proprietary formats to lock you into the eco system. It is fantastic for people that are technophobes but gets a little restrictive to the rest of us.

That characterization is a myth as far as I'm concerned. I am not a technophobe (far from it) and yet I prefer Apple's ecosystem. I realize that it represents potential for restrictiveness, but if & when such restrictions actually manifest, I can usually overcome them. I would have no qualms with "jail breaking" my Apple gear if I face the need. (I have actually done so on an older model of iPhone that is no longer used as a phone.) And I don't resent the fact that Apple made it such that I would have to. The way I see it, Apple has pleased both crowds: for those who don't want to "manage" their operating systems, the iOS gives them that off-the-shelf. For those who want more freedom and/or power, all they need do is take a simple action that is nothing but an example of their intent, i.e. take on that responsibility and ownership of the consequences.

Thompson
post #101 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ecphorizer View Post

Does that FIVEskin fit the 11" iPad as well?

Hey, Tod!

Not speaking from personal experience -- but I think it will!


Best

Richard

.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
post #102 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjw View Post

I use linux mainly on a super fast custom pc which also runs windows 7. I also have a macbook pro old version but I just got bored of the inflexibility of it. The whole apple eco-system really does not appeal to me.

In what way was your Macbook Pro inflexible? Its components are the same as WinTel PCs, and it can run Linux, Windows, etc. (Simultaneously even.)

Although I don't share it, I can understand your distaste for the whole Apple ecosystem, but the Macbook Pro can stand on its own and so is not a particular example.


Thompson
post #103 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Yes, but, of course, iPad is not on that list, so your list really has nothing to do with this issue.

Wow, really?!?! You really don't get that the list was of areas were Apple later changed design decisions they had made? That the list was examples of where Apple has made mistakes and/or misteps and later changed course? Suggesting that maybe, just maybe, 9.7" isn't the optimal size. That maybe Apple didn't give enough weight (no pun intended) to the size/weight issues vs having a larger screen.

Apple is not infallible. The list is examples of where they've made mistakes. Often times, those mistakes were pointed out by us, the users, long before Apple made changes. Sometimes, like in terms of the buttonless shuffle, it was pointed out the very day the product was announced. And yet Apple didn't realize it until later.

Only time will tell.... in the meantime, perhaps lay off the kool-aid.
post #104 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

Wow, really?!?! You really don't get that the list was of areas were Apple later changed design decisions they had made? That the list was examples of where Apple has made mistakes and/or misteps and later changed course? Suggesting that maybe, just maybe, 9.7" isn't the optimal size. That maybe Apple didn't give enough weight (no pun intended) to the size/weight issues vs having a larger screen. ...

Yes, I know what you were saying, but their sales numbers would seem to undercut your argument from that angle pretty thoroughly. So thoroughly, that I'd think you'd be feeling a little embarrassed having tried that particular angle of attack.
post #105 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

In what way was your Macbook Pro inflexible? Its components are the same as WinTel PCs, and it can run Linux, Windows, etc. (Simultaneously even.)

Although I don't share it, I can understand your distaste for the whole Apple ecosystem, but the Macbook Pro can stand on its own and so is not a particular example.


Thompson

My macbook pro died when I tried to use boot camp. I had to get a new logic board, luckily this was covered under warranty. The interface hardware is not standard, which means that running linux is not as pleasant as it is on my custom desktop pc. The hardware apple chooses is sub standard to what you can get in a custom pc, unless you go all out and get a mac pro. This means if I load windows on mac then gaming is no where near as good as on a windows designed high spec system for a similar price. I accept most of this is down to apple wanting the best user experience by narrowing hardware choices and all credit to them but it doesn't suit my wants/needs
post #106 of 188
Not!!!
post #107 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruel24 View Post

No OS X-powered netbook? I beg to differ... No, it's not $399, but what do you expect from Apple? Junk?




Beautiful photo.
post #108 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

True. I think Android (& Google products and services in general) appeals to the same sort of personality as Microsoft did in the '90s.

Pretty much everybody then?
post #109 of 188
Why the reviewers are fooling themselves? Have they tested its calling capability? Why I don't see a phone application on its screen?
post #110 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Ahh... That's very interesting -- the garbage collection priority. Got any links on that?

Also, Java is byteCode interpreted at runtime, No? So that's additional overhead.

.

To be fair about that, there are design patterns that can pretty much eliminate garbage collection issues. Doing things naively that creates tone of throwaway object doesn't do well performance-wise in any language. Manually releasing and release pools still do about the same amount of work in the end.

Yes, Java is normally running as bytecode, but the newer JIT bytecode compilers do a nice job of caching machine code and are getting pretty good at dynamically bound optimizations that are impossible in statically compiled programs. They aren't as quite fast as properly hand optimized assembler, or C, but the lower development effort makes things possible to do you just wouldn't want to do in vanilla C. It can be more or less as fast as object-orietnted C++ code as the JIT caching is finally better than the C++ VM table at runtime.

The common C++ is always faster than Java is really only founded anymore on C++ as a easier C, where inheritance of virtual methods is methodically avoided. If you are doing that you are giving up so much of the languages design potential you should just use C structs and function pointers, but most vocal C++ programmers just stare blankly during that conversation.
.
Reply
.
Reply
post #111 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjw View Post

If you know how to use a keyboard properly and you do a lot of google searches or commenting on articles then a keyboard is always faster than the iPad offering.

Nope. Really the only difference in short input typing is you need to look at the iPad onscreen keyboard.
.
Reply
.
Reply
post #112 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by raymondinperth View Post

There is nothing worth to be proud of till SAMSAMG can make its os .

http://bada.samsung.com/whatisbada/

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

Reply

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

Reply
post #113 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiro View Post

Nope. Really the only difference in short input typing is you need to look at the iPad onscreen keyboard.

Apart from the fact that it is awkward to hold on your lap or table. A case with a stand improves this slightly but still. Also typing on a screen means your hands are covering the content you are trying to view, something that will never be resolved.

A laptop and certainly a desktop will always be a faster and more pleasurable experience for me.
post #114 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tanny15 View Post

As more and more tablets come to the market, Apples success in that space could decline. After all, customers now have more options than they once did. And those options are now highlighted by the Samsung Galaxy Tab. The Samsung model is a 7-inch tablet that some observers say, could be even better than the iPad for us

Good grief! Don't spambots have any taste?

Don Reisinger !!!

http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Mobile-and-...-Why-454764/1/
post #115 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by dehildum View Post

The reason that Java has been slow on phone devices is that no manufacturer has bothered to put a decent JVM into their devices - and from a business perspective under the carrier dominant model, that actually made sense. Google on the other hand does have a reason to build a better JVM, and is doing so (slowly - possibly in part due to patent issues).

I was going to say the same thing
post #116 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjw View Post

Apart from the fact that it is awkward to hold on your lap or table. A case with a stand improves this slightly but still. Also typing on a screen means your hands are covering the content you are trying to view, something that will never be resolved.

The Apple case for the iPad improves the experience a lot. The keyboard is presented at a comfortable incline, which is better than what you get on a laptop, IMO. (Just comparing the angle of the surface, not the typing aspect.) Also, the screen is large enough so that even if you take away the part that the keyboard occupies, the remaining part may be larger than a netbook screen, and the content you are trying to view is scrolled into that area. On an Apples to Apples comparison with netbooks, it seems to me that one must weigh the touch typing requirement against the larger screen size of the iPad. Since I don't type that much (but I typed THIS on an iPad with no problem) the iPad wins for me. If one also values the richness of the eco-system (which you do not, but I do) the proposition becomes a slam dunk in favor of the iPad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjw View Post

A laptop and certainly a desktop will always be a faster and more pleasurable experience for me.

I agree that laptops, or especially desktops, would be better for your stated purposes (i.e. you do quite a bit of typing, apparently). But I thought the issue here is how the experience compares to a netbook. (Actually, the original article compares the iPad to the Galaxy Tab, which also is sans keyboard and super duper small, but I digress...) Netbooks and tablets occupy a space that is characterized by devices that are lower price, highly mobile, not easily expandable, longer battery life, and perhaps a bit underpowered relative to the traditional PC, etc. So comparing an iPad to something outside of that category is somewhat off point.

From what little I can tell of your use cases (potential development, referencing cloud compilers, etc) and preferences (touch typing and seeing your content) it seems like the netbook should edge out the tablet (because of the lack of physical keyboard) but that you might have disdain for the netbook as well because of the lack of screen real estate. At the end of the day, it really sounds like you wouldn't be too well served by that Chrome netbook either, but you may have some other unspoken requirements that drive the need.

For myself, grabbing something new, such as a netbook running Chrome, would be a neat experience because of the feeling of "discovery". But that feeling usually fades within a few weeks, leaving you with whatever the device actually offers. My hunch is that that wouldn't be much on the Chrome netbook, and that when I actually wanted a physical keyboard, I'd either go to my desktop, laptop, or simply use my wireless keyboard with the iPad.

Thompson
post #117 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjw View Post


Apple's eco system is primarily driven by proprietary formats to lock you into the eco system. It is fantastic for people that are technophobes but gets a little restrictive to the rest of us.

I use linux mainly on a super fast custom pc which also runs windows 7. I also have a macbook pro old version but I just got bored of the inflexibility of it. The whole apple eco-system really does not appeal to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjw View Post

My macbook pro died when I tried to use boot camp. I had to get a new logic board, luckily this was covered under warranty. The interface hardware is not standard, which means that running linux is not as pleasant as it is on my custom desktop pc. The hardware apple chooses is sub standard to what you can get in a custom pc, unless you go all out and get a mac pro. This means if I load windows on mac then gaming is no where near as good as on a windows designed high spec system for a similar price. I accept most of this is down to apple wanting the best user experience by narrowing hardware choices and all credit to them but it doesn't suit my wants/needs

Your concerns read like a compendium of internet memes written by someone who has never actually used the hardware.

What proprietary formats, specifically? What "non-standard interface hardware", specifically? And how does that impact your Linux experience, specifically? What hardware is substandard?

Also, is it your contention that trying to run Bootcamp killed your motherboard, somehow? Because I've never heard of that.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
post #118 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Your concerns read like a compendium of internet memes written by someone who has never actually used the hardware.

What proprietary formats, specifically? What "non-standard interface hardware", specifically? And how does that impact your Linux experience, specifically? What hardware is substandard?

Also, is it your contention that trying to run Bootcamp killed your motherboard, somehow? Because I've never heard of that.

Boot camp on mac is not as straightforward for linux as installing it on a pc.

My boot camp experience and many others by the sounds of it with windows 7: http://www.google.co.uk/search?aq=f&...ursor+bootcamp

The hardware built into mac machines, ie the CPU, GPU, memory is sub standard compared with custom PCs that can be built for the same price. You cannot argue with that.

Mac keyboards are just an annoyance to set up with linux, I can't use my magic mouse with linux. Two proprietary interface devices that I prefer not to use with linux.
post #119 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjw View Post

The hardware built into mac machines, ie the CPU, GPU, memory is sub standard compared with custom PCs that can be built for the same price. You cannot argue with that.

As for buying extra memory or drive capacity. What you say is true for EVERY vendor. One of the things you pay for when you spec up a machine for delivery is the convenience. Always has been and always will be that way. So comparing any produced box, Apple or otherwise, is a ridiculous exercise. Either you want to build it yourself, then none of the manufacturer prices matter. Or you don't and home brew component prices don't matter.


Really? Sub-standard memory? You think the OS knows anything about CAS latencies or ECC ratings? Maybe your problem is the Linux communities difficulties with accepting EFI for the comfort of BIOS rather than the components themselves. So I won't argue, I'll just laugh and walk away. [yes I know Linux can boot on EFI, I also know if the community lost it's fear of it, the EFI boot might not be more than a glorified hack]
.
Reply
.
Reply
post #120 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiro View Post

As for buying extra memory or drive capacity. What you say is true for EVERY vendor. One of the things you pay for when you spec up a machine for delivery is the convenience. Always has been and always will be that way. So comparing any produced box, Apple or otherwise, is a ridiculous exercise. Either you want to build it yourself, then none of the manufacturer prices matter. Or you don't and home brew component prices don't matter.


Really? Sub-standard memory? You think the OS knows anything about CAS latencies or ECC ratings? Maybe your problem is the Linux communities difficulties with accepting EFI for the comfort of BIOS rather than the components themselves. So I won't argue, I'll just laugh and walk away. [yes I know Linux can boot on EFI, I also know if the community lost it's fear of it, the EFI boot might not be more than a glorified hack]

People like tjw think they are common PC consumer while feeling elitist for using Linux, and they think they are the voice of reason in CE yet they ignore things like reliability, power consumption and compatibility. All they focus on is one aspect of the HW specs; the part they can brag to their Linux brethren about their souped up system that blows any vendor-made system away at a faction of the cost.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPad
  • Review roundup: Samsung's Galaxy Tab, the iPad's first "real" competitor
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Review roundup: Samsung's Galaxy Tab, the iPad's first "real" competitor