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'Hulu for magazines' to debut on Android as publishers struggle with Apple

post #1 of 120
Thread Starter 
Publishers' continued frustration with Apple has apparently led a new joint venture from major magazines to debut on Google's Android platform in early 2011, rather than on iOS devices.

Next Issue Media, the magazine consortium that plans to open a digital storefront early next year, will launch on devices running Google's Android mobile operating system, CEO Morgan Guenther told MediaMemo. He added that his company is "ready to support Apple," and it's not technical limitations keeping the platform dubbed a "Hulu for magazines" from the iPad.

"Guenther wouldn't disclose other details about his launch, but you don't have to squint to read between the lines here," Peter Kafka wrote. "The takeaway is that Google has been flexible on the business issues that are important to the publishers that own his company. And that Apple's not there yet."

Publishers continue to struggle with Apple, as the company is not willing to allow publications to access users' personal information. However, the print business relies on demographic information to share data about readers with advertisers.

In September, it was rumored that Apple would introduce new subscription plans for content on the iPad, allowing customers to opt in and grant content providers the ability to share their personal information. Another report alleged that Apple is working on a standalone digital newsstand app that would be a new storefront, like the App Store or iBooks, that would be home to newspapers and magazines.

But for now, content providers who create applications for the iPad are restricted. For example, Kafka noted, when readers subscribe to Newsweek on the iPad, the publisher has "no idea who you are or how to reach you: Apple keeps all of the data, as well as 30 percent of every dollar."

Though Guenther didn't comment specifically, it was speculated that publishers with Next Issue Media are hoping that content sales on Android devices are strong enough to give them leverage in negotiations with Apple.

Publishers have struggled with Apple in bringing their content to the iPad since the device first launched in April. Initially, the Cupertino, Calif., company did not allow subscriptions to magazines through the App Store. But that impasse was broken in August, when People magazine became the first publication to offer subscribers free access to its iPad application.
post #2 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Next Issue Media, the magazine consortium that plans to open a digital storefront early next year

What's the point? Zinio is available today globally for iOS, Android, OS/X, Linux and Windows.
post #3 of 120
This is the kill shot...

"Publishers continue to struggle with Apple, as the company is not willing to allow publications to access users' personal information. However, the print business relies on demographic information to share data about readers with advertisers."

I.E. Google has no problems giving anyone that asks all your personal information but Apple does and this is somehow contorted to Apple being too controlling - really??
post #4 of 120
Quote:
when readers subscribe to Newsweek on the iPad, the publisher has "no idea who you are or how to reach you

And that's just the way I like it so I am sticking with apple's model. I'm gonna get the content I really want one way or the other and if providers can't figure that out and collect their pennies per view/read, they'd better start bribing congress critters for tarp money now because they'll be going out of business soon enough.
post #5 of 120
this is a litmus test and it shows who gives a damn and who doesn't.
Google could careless about privacy. They'll roll over and lick a you know what for that dollar. So I'm not at all surprised by this.
And as the Android tablets mature onto the market those ads will be as intrusive as what goes on on our pc. Dimming of an article we're reading as advertisements for some antidepressant pops open. I effing hate that. And of course it will take a million clicks on the x to close the damn thing.
Meh!
post #6 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2 cents View Post

And that's just the way I like it so I am sticking with apple's model. I'm gonna get the content I really want one way or the other and if providers can't figure that out and collect their pennies per view/read, they'd better start bribing congress critters for tarp money now because they'll be going out of business soon enough.

Hallelujah! Praise the lawld. He says ith and so does it happenith!
Thundercats! HOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!
post #7 of 120
Here's hoping the iPad manages to hold its dominance long enough to make publishers blink.

It's all about the dollar. If Apple keeps a majority position in the tablet market the loss of potential revenue for publishers will equal what thy hope to gain by holding out, and at that point some struggling publisher will break ranks.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
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A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
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post #8 of 120
Google? Privacy? What parallel fringe universe do they live in? When the CEO says if you want to get rid of your home in street view, just move. (paraphrasing)
post #9 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Publishers' continued frustration with Apple has apparently led a new joint venture from major magazines to debut on Google's Android platform in early 2011, rather than on iOS devices.
.



Are the magazine publishers as stupid as the record company executives?
post #10 of 120
I don't know what you guys are on apart from Steve Jobs' koolaid. Zinio serves all platforms and naturally publishers will prefer a cross-platform solution to hedge their bets.
post #11 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

Here's hoping the iPad manages to hold its dominance long enough to make publishers blink.

It's all about the dollar. If Apple keeps a majority position in the tablet market the loss of potential revenue for publishers will equal what thy hope to gain by holding out, and at that point some struggling publisher will break ranks.

If only these publishers could see what a killing they could make by actually playing ball with Apple. Customers would be happy, Apple would sell sacks of iPads and the publishers would be laughing all the way to the bank.

Oh well, dreams are free. Unfortunately for the publishers, so are PDFs on the net.
...and no, I do not have an iPad or a desire to obtain/read PDF books on my Mac.

Save your friends from Skynet - whoops, Google.  Recommend they use StartPage for search..

...and no, I am not paid to say this..

Reply

Save your friends from Skynet - whoops, Google.  Recommend they use StartPage for search..

...and no, I am not paid to say this..

Reply
post #12 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by habermas View Post

What's the point? Zinio is available today globally for iOS, Android, OS/X, Linux and Windows.

Zinio is a piece of crap.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #13 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by habermas View Post

I don't know what you guys are on apart from Steve Jobs' koolaid. Zinio serves all platforms and naturally publishers will prefer a cross-platform solution to hedge their bets.

The Zinio "experience" for reading magazines on the iPhone and iPad is like wiping after number 2 with a wire brush. The best magazine apps by far so far on the iPad are the ones developed using Adobe InDesign: like The New Yorker etc. The UI, speed of the app, download size and experience is by far the best, and that's nothing to do with the 'koolaid', as you put it.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #14 of 120
UI and size of download - very well but that can all be iteratively improved, no?

Fact of the matter is that Zinio is here today and available globally on all major platforms. This vapourware next issue media sounds to me like an also-ran before it got started. And all the iOs-specific applications are all very nice eye candy but they are too locked up in Apple's ecosphere for me to care to waste subscription money on.
post #15 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Zinio is a piece of crap.

What is Zinio anyway? Sounds like that old Zune MP3 player that bombed years ago.
post #16 of 120
Quote:
But for now, content providers who create applications for the iPad are restricted. For example, Kafka noted, when readers subscribe to Newsweek on the iPad, the publisher has "no idea who you are or how to reach you: Apple keeps all of the data...


Are you kidding me?!? Is it a PROBLEM that publishers can't get my personal info? How do they get my personal info when I buy a magazine at a news stand? That seems to be working for them w/o getting my demographics.

I develop for both iOS and android, and I really don't have a horse in this race, but for publishers to act as though consumers are missing out because apple won't dish out personal info to help drive adverts is simply ludicrous!
post #17 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Zinio is a piece of crap.

Years ago I used to get free magazines on Zinio, as some sort of a free trial or market test or something. I even still have my custom FreeMagazines@redacted.com email address, and I still get occasion junk mail on it. I subscribed to a few different magazines, but I found that I didn't read them there, so I kind of dropped the whole thing.

I think that a good magazine reader for a pocketable tablet would be great. But it would have to somehow be MUCH better than available webpages to justify any sort of cash outlay. These days, magazines are several days or weeks or months behind the times. Web pages get updated continually. I used to read lots of magazines, and I still enjoy them. But usually, I am familiar with the topic already, having seen it on the 'web previously.
post #18 of 120
Quote:
Are the magazine publishers as stupid as the record company executives?

...yes.

It's all about greeeeeeed my friend.

Apple, or anybody really, could develop a device that can turn crap into gold blocks, and these greedy corps., will cling to their current paradigm's in hopes that they too can develop such a device on their own and reap all of the benefits.

Greed at this point, is stifling technology, not Apple, their policies, or their 'closed' devices.

Then you got all of the other 'open' platforms that cater to the greed, so they too can cash in, and give us tech-geeks 2nd rate software.
post #19 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

Here's hoping the iPad manages to hold its dominance long enough to make publishers blink.

It's all about the dollar. If Apple keeps a majority position in the tablet market the loss of potential revenue for publishers will equal what thy hope to gain by holding out, and at that point some struggling publisher will break ranks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lostkiwi View Post

If only these publishers could see what a killing they could make by actually playing ball with Apple. Customers would be happy, Apple would sell sacks of iPads and the publishers would be laughing all the way to the bank.

Oh well, dreams are free. Unfortunately for the publishers, so are PDFs on the net.
...and no, I do not have an iPad or a desire to obtain/read PDF books on my Mac.

But would they "make a killing"? I'm not saying magazines should have our names, phone numbers, etc. But advertisers pay top dollar to be able focus their ads. Basic demographics are needed to do that. If you subscribe to any mags via mail, you are already giving publishers that basic info. Are you watching Hulu? Guess, what they know where you are when you are watching it (and probably a lot more).

If advertising revenue drops dramatically because the publisher can't tell the potential ad purchaser, "our magazine is popular with females and we have strong sales in the East which is your primary target audience", will revenue from Apple make up for that?

I don't know. And I suspect neither does anyone else here. Do we know what data the publishers are asking for that Apple is refusing to share. Is it our names, or just the very basic of info like what regions the publication sells best in? And is Apple really withholding that data to "protect our privacy" or because they want to leverage it for their own business purposes? It may be that Apple is afraid the data will tell too much of their own iOS customer base that they don't want their device competitors getting ahold of the data.
post #20 of 120
Magazines are dead.
post #21 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Zinio is a piece of crap.


Yet another well reasoned argument

Originally Posted by Rickers - 2014

Cook & Co will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost for so long.  Steve == Apple and Apple == Steve.  

Reply

Originally Posted by Rickers - 2014

Cook & Co will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost for so long.  Steve == Apple and Apple == Steve.  

Reply
post #22 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by CIM View Post

Magazines are dead.

another statement with nothing to back it up!

Originally Posted by Rickers - 2014

Cook & Co will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost for so long.  Steve == Apple and Apple == Steve.  

Reply

Originally Posted by Rickers - 2014

Cook & Co will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost for so long.  Steve == Apple and Apple == Steve.  

Reply
post #23 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by habermas View Post

I don't know what you guys are on apart from Steve Jobs' koolaid. Zinio serves all platforms and naturally publishers will prefer a cross-platform solution to hedge their bets.

Zinio isn't all that great though. I've tried several subs there, and they don't work as well as I'd like. In addition they're just PDF's of the published edition. No extra features or anything.

There are stand-alone mags out that I get for free that are a bit better.
post #24 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by habermas View Post

UI and size of download - very well but that can all be iteratively improved, no?

Fact of the matter is that Zinio is here today and available globally on all major platforms. This vapourware next issue media sounds to me like an also-ran before it got started. And all the iOs-specific applications are all very nice eye candy but they are too locked up in Apple's ecosphere for me to care to waste subscription money on.

As we've been saying, Zinio isn't very good- on any platform. It's just at the beginning of the era for this, and we're seeing a lot of different approaches. Some are better than others.

I think we need at least a couple more years.
post #25 of 120
The big problem with these Publishers. Is that they want to choose for you. They want to control your decision
If you want to have this stuff thrown on your face. That you are not
able to opt out of any solicitation.
That is what S.Jobs wants to make possible for us. He knows that
the Publishers will always want to have us handcuffed to the way
things have always been done.
To bad. The Google's and Microsoft's, even the FaceBooks of the
world will surrender to the wills of the slave-masters.
Apple will try holding them off as long as possible.
post #26 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul94544 View Post

another statement with nothing to back it up!

That’s because it’s common knowledge.
post #27 of 120
Steve Jobs protects our privacy and Google violates our privacy at every opportunity to make a buck. I am very proud to own Apple products. I am strongly considering boycotting Google.
post #28 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhyson View Post

Are you kidding me?!? Is it a PROBLEM that publishers can't get my personal info? How do they get my personal info when I buy a magazine at a news stand? That seems to be working for them w/o getting my demographics.

I develop for both iOS and android, and I really don't have a horse in this race, but for publishers to act as though consumers are missing out because apple won't dish out personal info to help drive adverts is simply ludicrous!

Well for starters they know where their magazine is selling well (i.e. More people buy in New York than in L.A.)
post #29 of 120
Just to pose the devil's advocate question, the magazine companies have my info (address etc) if I subscribe to their magazine as they have to send it to me. Of course if buy it at the newsstand at cover price, they don't have it. If they only want the same info they'd get with a snail subscription, I do see their point. Nothing else should be shared of course.
post #30 of 120
A few points:

1) one of the issues here is recurring subscriptions. When you subscribe to a print magazine and your subscription is about to end they can send you renewal notices because they have your name and address. The only mechanism within the current system is notifications, and even that doesn't really work since it is not tied to the store.

2) what if you already subscribe to the print publication, shouldn't you get your iPad subscription for free? Of course, and publishers want to do that for you but, again, there is no mechanism for that right now. (I think the answer here is promo codes -- developers hand these out to sample an app, maybe Apple could allow promo codes to be given by publishers to print subscribers --this way Apple doesn't have to deal with it and the publishers will have to handle the transaction.)

Eventually these things will get worked out.

As for some of the claims here... 1) magazines are dead -- tell that to the millions of magazine readers; 2) publishers are greedy just like the music companies -- publishing is like a lot of businesses: a few make a lot of money, everyone else is struggling. It's a tough business, folks.
post #31 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by CIM View Post

Thats because its common knowledge.

I probably get a dozen magazines a month. Trade journals, National Geographic, Wired, Cooks-all of them are easier to read than their counterparts on my laptop or iPhone. I spend as much time reading stuff online, but in-depth reportage is easier to focus on in print, at least for me.
post #32 of 120
Apple is becoming the Big Brother that they threw the hammer at in 1984.

Glad to see their stiff-arming backfire on them. Hopefully it happens more often.
post #33 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrobr View Post

I probably get a dozen magazines a month. Trade journals, National Geographic, Wired, Cooks-all of them are easier to read than their counterparts on my laptop or iPhone. I spend as much time reading stuff online, but in-depth reportage is easier to focus on in print, at least for me.

I bet you are over 30.

Quote:
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

Apple is becoming the Big Brother that they threw the hammer at in 1984.

Glad to see their stiff-arming backfire on them. Hopefully it happens more often.

Reading comprehension fail.
post #34 of 120
Just a case of google promising the stars to get into a space and then worrying about delivering after. Hows that google streaming tv working out with those major networks?
post #35 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by maccherry View Post

Google could careless about privacy.

the statement "Google couldn't care less about privacy ..." is probably supported by the EULA of the Android OS.
post #36 of 120
these publishers are just as dumb as their newspaper cousins.

magazine type content just does not visually work on a small 7" screen and/or a 16:9 aspect. which is where Android tabs are going. sure, you can display it, but it is nowhere near as pleasant to read/see as on the iPad's 10" 4:3 screen. takes twice as much scrolling and shows half-sized single-view ads. DOA.

to get reader demo data, they need to offer something in exchange for subscribers opting-in for that. bonus content, discounts, whatever. sure, Google will give it to them without users' consent - but just the paltry number of subscribers that use an Android tab for magazines.
post #37 of 120
Good! Bring on some damn competition- we need inewstand or whatever they re going to call it and the ability to subscribe to incoming, constantly delivered publications. Maybe they will bring it out with the retina display ipad...
post #38 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhyson View Post

Is it a PROBLEM that publishers can't get my personal info? How do they get my personal info when I buy a magazine at a news stand?

the article talks about subscriptions. purchasing a magazine at a news stand isn't within the context of this discussions. magazine publishers know the names and addresses of people who subscribe to their print publications; the publishers want the same information available from people who subscribe to their digital publications.
post #39 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

Google is becoming the Big Brother that Apple threw the hammer at in 1984.

There, I fixed it for you.
post #40 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by maccherry View Post

Hallelujah! Praise the lawld. He says ith and so does it happenith!
Thundercats! HOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

Excuse me. Is there a translation for this?


Quote:
Originally Posted by TalkingNewMedia View Post

A few points:

1) one of the issues here is recurring subscriptions. When you subscribe to a print magazine and your subscription is about to end they can send you renewal notices because they have your name and address. The only mechanism within the current system is notifications, and even that doesn't really work since it is not tied to the store.

2) what if you already subscribe to the print publication, shouldn't you get your iPad subscription for free? Of course, and publishers want to do that for you but, again, there is no mechanism for that right now. (I think the answer here is promo codes -- developers hand these out to sample an app, maybe Apple could allow promo codes to be given by publishers to print subscribers --this way Apple doesn't have to deal with it and the publishers will have to handle the transaction.)

#1. They want your information because information is goldnot for subscription renewal. As for #2, no, you'd be wrong. Example. The New Yorker wants $5 PER iPad edition EVEN IF YOU SUBSCRIBE to the print edition. You get no discount off the print version vs. the newsstand or for being a subscriber. Fail x 2 and about par for the course for these clowns.


Quote:
Originally Posted by anotherperson View Post

I am strongly considering boycotting Google.

I put up with all their shenanigans but the verigoogle news was the last straw. I've dropped google from anything essential. I've kept my gmail account but it was always a secondary email and now has been relegated to a throw-away email (for posting on random blogs and such). I'm checking out other search engines and in most cases I see little to bring me back to google. Contacts? I would never give them my contact list. I even stopped using voice for all but 99% of my calls. Etc, etc. Point is, there is life after google.
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