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'Hulu for magazines' to debut on Android as publishers struggle with Apple - Page 2

post #41 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Google seems to know how to take care of its people. Don't see news like this coming from Apple even though they have record earning. Then again it would be hard to get a bonus to the slave labor in china.

http://www.businessinsider.com/googl...-raise-2010-11

That's from all the money the NSA paid them to spy on us. Google = cyber-halliburton.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010...y-on-everyone/
post #42 of 120
Surprising no one here seems to like Zinio. While it's largely a directly translation from print to digital for most magazines and doesn't offer the interactivity that it could, there are interactive editions of some issues (National Geographic, in albeit a limited fashion). The digital 'magazine' experience will evolve over time as it already has with standalone applications, but I would really embrace the idea of having ONE extensible application that held these kinds of publications, much like what has been talked about with Apple's solution. (However there are reasons why I don't like Apple as a content controller, but that's a longer discussion.) I don't want a folder or screen littered with icons of one-off magazine editions, especially the kind that might weigh in at 500 MB or whatever that Wired one was.

I've had a good experience with Zinio so far. It's not perfect, but they keep improving their application, and it offers ad-subsidized subscriptions of a bunch of good magazines. Hopefully their selection will improve over time.
post #43 of 120
Apple's control freak nature is going to hurt them in the end. There is beginning to be too much competition for this kind of crap. Android is just going to keep getting better and better, and Apple needs to watch out.

I agree that Google is becoming Big Brother. I'm quite sure the wi-fi snooping wasn't just unintentional. Why would they pick up on people's wi-fi connections as they take pics driving down the street? I don't get how that could be unintentional at all.
post #44 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Google seems to know how to take care of its people. Don't see news like this coming from Apple even though they have record earning. Then again it would be hard to get a bonus to the slave labor in china.

http://www.businessinsider.com/googl...-raise-2010-11

And, this is relevant exactly how?

Besides, no one ever said Big Brother was a cheap bastard. He pays his henchmen well, to buy their loyalty.
post #45 of 120
Apple needs to sit down and ask itself, "If this person subscribed to a physical magazine what information would naturally have to be given to the seller?"

Tracking every click, may be a problem but basic demographics should not be an issue. Apple is the middle man, the company whose product is being used has the right to all information. If anyone should have limited access it should be Apple. Apple is just the medium through which the product is sold. Nothing more.
post #46 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

If you are worried about people spying on you then you need to stay off the internet.

Have you been taking that "How to Think and Act like Eric Schmidt" online course?
post #47 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

If you are worried about people spying on you then you need to stay off the internet.

Defeatist!!!
post #48 of 120
I bet you are over 30.

And has his own job, makes his own money, and has his own house.
post #49 of 120
I have cancelled all my print magazines -- I can get all the info I need from various websites.
post #50 of 120
I Hope Apple sticks to their guns. I really do want some sense of privacy, even if it is limited

TechnoMinds

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TechnoMinds

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post #51 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyhart View Post

Apple needs to sit down and ask itself, "If this person subscribed to a physical magazine what information would naturally have to be given to the seller?"

Tracking every click, may be a problem but basic demographics should not be an issue. Apple is the middle man, the company whose product is being used has the right to all information. If anyone should have limited access it should be Apple. Apple is just the medium through which the product is sold. Nothing more.

While I agree with some of what you are saying, Apple is not just the medium. They are the brand that we are buying into and trusting. They are providing the quality and in this case the privacy control that we are trusting in.

TechnoMinds

We are a Montreal based technology company that offers a variety of tech services such as tech support for Apple products, Drupal based website development, computer training and iCloud...

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TechnoMinds

We are a Montreal based technology company that offers a variety of tech services such as tech support for Apple products, Drupal based website development, computer training and iCloud...

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post #52 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Google seems to know how to take care of its people. Don't see news like this coming from Apple even though they have record earning. Then again it would be hard to get a bonus to the slave labor in china.

http://www.businessinsider.com/googl...-raise-2010-11

And Google just fired the guy who brought you that news.

http://money.cnn.com/2010/11/10/tech...rain/index.htm

SleeperTroll!
post #53 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by piot View Post

And Google just fired the guy who brought you that news.

I believe they use the term, terminated.
post #54 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by anotherperson View Post

Steve Jobs protects our privacy and Google violates our privacy at every opportunity to make a buck. I am very proud to own Apple products. I am strongly considering boycotting Google.

I've done that too. I now use Exalead for search and Lavabit for Email, works great.

Those Journals can get the ZIP code you are in without problems, (see here) if they want more they are greedy. By the way your Google Phone reserves itselves the right to do with your location info whatever it deems good for Googles consumers, whoever that might be..
post #55 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyhart View Post

Apple needs to sit down and ask itself, "If this person subscribed to a physical magazine what information would naturally have to be given to the seller?"

Tracking every click, may be a problem but basic demographics should not be an issue. Apple is the middle man, the company whose product is being used has the right to all information. If anyone should have limited access it should be Apple. Apple is just the medium through which the product is sold. Nothing more.

The problem is that most of what the magazine folks tell you about the demographics information they "need" is complete BS. People are assuming that the magazine publishers are being straight with us, that they are just like any other business, and that they have "readerships" that care about the magazine articles and stuff like that when almost none of that is true.

The "demographic information" they want is really just your name, address, phone number and credit card information. Sure they like to know if the readership of this or that magazine is made up mostly of kids, teens, or adults, but they can easily get that from surveys as well. What they really want is just "who's reading it, and what's their credit info." This information is sold to their advertisers and others. It's pretty much the whole purpose of the magazine. The reason there are different types of magazines and that the categories break along "lifestyle" lines, is that the advertisers want to know the credit information of this or that "type" of consumer (are you a housewife? are you gay? are you a doctor? etc. etc.). The magazine types conform to the demographic categories that the advertisers want to sell to.

With magazines, mostly you are buying a few usually quite thin "articles" that are mostly written by hacks and mostly repeat information that is freely available almost anywhere. Roughly 50% or more of the magazine is the advertisements. Even though usually the presence of advertisements makes something cheap or free, in the case of magazines, people (for some stupid reason), actually *PAY* their own money for the privilege of being advertised to. Not only that, magazines are almost the most expensive form of media there is in terms of what you get back for your dollar.

Magazines exist for those advertisements, the other stuff changes year to year and month to month depending on what it is that will get people to look at the advertisements. They want to know just enough information to be able to target you with products. That's pretty much the entire point of the whole industry. The primary "customer" of the average magazine, isn't the consumers that buy them, but the advertisers that place the ads in them. That's who magazines exist for and who determines the shape, content and general outlook of the magazine.

Selling your information and your basic demographics to advertisers is pretty much the entire point of magazines. It always has been and always will be that way. That's why even before the digital age, magazines are mostly sold by subscription and why every single magazine you ever picked up has a cardboard insert that tells you how much cheaper it would be if you *subscribed* to the magazine instead of buying it at the store.
post #56 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by maccherry View Post

And as the Android tablets mature onto the market those ads will be as intrusive as what goes on on our pc. Dimming of an article we're reading as advertisements for some antidepressant pops open. I effing hate that. And of course it will take a million clicks on the x to close the damn thing.
Meh!

Same goes for trying to watch TV shows online.
post #57 of 120
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post #58 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Selling your information and your basic demographics to advertisers is pretty much the entire point of magazines. It always has been and always will be that way. That's why even before the digital age, magazines are mostly sold by subscription and why every single magazine you ever picked up has a cardboard insert that tells you how much cheaper it would be if you *subscribed* to the magazine instead of buying it at the store.

I don't think it is quite as sinister as you make it out to be. One reason they want the signature on the subscription card is for their BPA audit. See, the more validated subscriptions they have, the higher rate they get to charge for a page of advertising. The advertisers don't just take their word for it about their circulation numbers. Just because you print a hundred thousand copies doesn't mean they were delivered. They don't sell your info to the advertisers. All they have is a name and address. Most of the time they don't have any contact at all with the companies since it is their ad agencies that pay for the placement.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #59 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

So every employee is a henchmen? Yeah you stick with that mouse.

It doesn't surprise me to find you can't understand things that don't have a literal meaning.
post #60 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

If you're not running Android Google's just a search engine to you, in a world of many. How hard can it be?

Harder than you might guess, given that they have tracking software -- e.g., Google Analytics -- spread all over the web.
post #61 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2 cents View Post

1. They want your information because information is goldnot for subscription renewal. As for #2, no, you'd be wrong. Example. The New Yorker wants $5 PER iPad edition EVEN IF YOU SUBSCRIBE to the print edition. You get no discount off the print version vs. the newsstand or for being a subscriber. Fail x 2 and about par for the course for these clowns.

This is what publishers want, not what they are doing. And they aren't doing it because they can't at this point.

Publishers are releasing paid apps of individual issues because the subscription model just isn't there yet.

As for information being "gold" -- true, but consumer magazine publishers don't get good information from its readers through the subscription process (generally), they get information through reader surveys. Only trade publishers get good information when they force you to fill out those longer subscription cards -- but those are for controlled circulation magazines (free).
post #62 of 120
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post #63 of 120
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post #64 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I don't think it is quite as sinister as you make it out to be. One reason they want the signature on the subscription card is for their BPA audit. See, the more validated subscriptions they have, the higher rate they get to charge for a page of advertising. The advertisers don't just take their word for it about their circulation numbers. Just because you print a hundred thousand copies doesn't mean they were delivered. They don't sell your info to the advertisers. All they have is a name and address. Most of the time they don't have any contact at all with the companies since it is their ad agencies that pay for the placement.

Actually, trade publishers (those that are BPA audited, most consumer magazines are ABC audited) do sell your name and address to customers -- they do this through list rentals. The buyer doesn't get to keep the information, but use those lists for promotional mailers.

Consumer magazines also rent lists -- that's why you end up getting so many wine accessory catalogs once you've subscribed to something like the Wine Spectator.

But you are right about that signature being important. One of the largest expenses publishers face is maintaining their circulation files.
post #65 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

The "demographic information" they want is really just your name, address, phone number and credit card information.
With magazines, mostly you are buying a few usually quite thin "articles" that are mostly written by hacks and mostly repeat information that is freely available almost anywhere.

And with the current system, Apple would now get the very same information. For the consumer it's a wash, but for the magazines it is handing over revenue to Apple (plus the 30%, minus the content delivery cost).
And if you try to suggest that most magazines are a fraud, you essentially say that all the people buying them are stupid.
post #66 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

You don't have a cookie blocking filter? They're all over the place for Firefox, I'd imagine there would be several for Safari by now.

The point was that avoiding being tracked by Google is not as simple as just not actively using their search engine and other services.
post #67 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by TalkingNewMedia View Post

Actually, trade publishers (those that are BPA audited, most consumer magazines are ABC audited) do sell your name and address to customers -- they do this through list rentals. The buyer doesn't get to keep the information, but use those lists for promotional mailers.

Consumer magazines also rent lists -- that's why you end up getting so many wine accessory catalogs once you've subscribed to something like the Wine Spectator.

But you are right about that signature being important. One of the largest expenses publishers face is maintaining their circulation files.


That is true. I was not clear enough while replying about collecting and selling demographics. A simple name and address is not very informative from a marketing standpoint. The original poster was implying that they would sell age, gender, occupation, etc which is not the case.

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post #68 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by noirdesir View Post

And with the current system, Apple would now get the very same information. For the consumer it's a wash, but for the magazines it is handing over revenue to Apple (plus the 30%, minus the content delivery cost).
And if you try to suggest that most magazines are a fraud, you essentially say that all the people buying them are stupid.

Well, you have it exactly right. the difference is that Apple (so far) doesn't do nefarious things with that information. They instead, actually keep it secure.

Why anyone thinks that handing this information over to the magazines is a good idea and that Apple is somehow in the wrong for not doing so, is beyond me (and mostly my point).

As to magazine buyers being stupid, I realised as I was writing that last that the kind of magazines I'm talking about doesn't actually stand true for *all* magazines. Some of the technical ones have actual information, some of the older ones have minimal advertising etc. However, if we are talking about the majority of magazines, (fashion, "style", home and garden etc.), then yes, the people who buy them *are* stupid.

You are essentially spending a relatively huge amount of money, for a package of advertisements, (and somewhere between minimal and zero information content). If that doesn't count as a generally dumb-ass thing to do then what does?
post #69 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

The best magazine apps by far so far on the iPad are the ones developed using Adobe InDesign: like The New Yorker etc. The UI, speed of the app, download size and experience is by far the best, and that's nothing to do with the 'koolaid', as you put it.

You might be right with most of that, but I don't think download size. Both Wired and The New Yorker are based on InDesign, and their size is in the hundreds of megabytes. Compare that to the size of reading their respective issues on their websites.
post #70 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Zinio is a piece of crap.

Agreed! I had Zinio a few years ago on my iMac...thinking that it would be cool to have live links in the articles...but even with a 20" iMac I spent too much time scrolling and zooming in and out....I eventually deleted it, cancelled my online subscriptions and went back to dead tree periodicals...

I do plan to get a second gen iPad Mainly because my daughter and I are really digging Facetime. And then I will put an end to all my dead tree periodicals.

PS. I can't believe any company wouldn't hitch their wagon to Apple! Unbelievable. Yes they are following the music industry and network television and the cable companies right down the proverbial drain!

Best
post #71 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Well, you have it exactly right. the difference is that Apple (so far) doesn't do nefarious things with that information. They instead, actually keep it secure.

Why anyone thinks that handing this information over to the magazines is a good idea and that Apple is somehow in the wrong for not doing so, is beyond me (and mostly my point).

There is nothing wrong with Apple not handing it over, if you are happy to compensate the magazine more for your iPad copy than the paper copy. The point is with the current system, the magazine publishers get less selling to the iPad then selling on paper. That is not what the digital revolution was supposed to be about.

And any decent magazine has a checkbox on their subscription form whether you allow them to use your personal data for other purposes then delivering the magazine. It's mandated by law in most industrial countries.
post #72 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul94544 View Post

Yet another well reasoned argument

Crap is crap. It's not an argument, it's an opinion.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #73 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by noirdesir View Post

You might be right with most of that, but I don't think download size. Both Wired and The New Yorker are based on InDesign, and their size is in the hundreds of megabytes. Compare that to the size of reading their respective issues on their websites.

It's a better experience, once downloaded. It's faster, feels lighter, and looks nicer than anything else.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #74 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by CIM View Post

Reading comprehension fail.

Talk about throwing stones in a glass house

Seriously? None of your synapses could figure out that Apple wants to keep all of your personal information for themselves? To power their own advertising initiatives? That their entire mobile platform revolves around this control?

Wow dude, talk about epic reading comprehension fail.

Apple, Google, Microsoft, RIM, Walmart... no large corporation is looking out for your privacy - just how to exploit it for their own gains.

If you can't read between the lines and see what is really happening (hello, your privacy is a commodity, pick your flavor of who you want to control it)... then you should chill on the ad-hom attacks.

Apple and Google are big brother.
post #75 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by rain View Post

Apple and Google are big brother.

I think it's safe to say Apple and Google are not the same when it comes to privacy. Google are more like FaceBook. Although Apple does use user data, they don't do it like FaceBook and Google do it. Apple is more like: "people who like that app also like this app", or "people who like that music also like this music". Apple never goes to that creepy Google-level. I believe there is a line with this thing that Apple never crosses, and it's because they actually give a shit about your privacy. Google and FaceBook don't, because it's "their whole business model".
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #76 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

There, I fixed it for you.

1984 has long since passed, Apple are different these days. They are a corporation. That said, they are not like Google. Apple are more honest and upfront about how they are using our data. That's the difference. And unlike Google and FaceBook, Apple give you a choice.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #77 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

The point was that avoiding being tracked by Google is not as simple as just not actively using their search engine and other services.

Every vid you've ever looked at on YouTube...and added to your favourites...

Regarding your earlier point, the Ghostery add-on for FireFox blocks GoogleAnalytics, and yes they are poking around at just about every page I visit. Also BetterPrivacy which blocks Flash permanent cookies (which bypass your browser preferences and stores them elsewhere without your knowledge). When I first installed it I had nearly 550 of the little critters squatting on my hard drive without my permission. I suspect this is still only sticking band-aid on a cracking dam, but at least I keep a bit of self respect this way!
Believe nothing, no matter where you heard it, not even if I have said it, if it does not agree with your own reason and your own common sense.
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Believe nothing, no matter where you heard it, not even if I have said it, if it does not agree with your own reason and your own common sense.
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post #78 of 120
Not gonna work, Google. Apple's infrastructure for these services is by far the strongest and most mature.
post #79 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post

Google? Privacy? What parallel fringe universe do they live in? When the CEO says if you want to get rid of your home in street view, just move. (paraphrasing)

And, of course... If you don't want people to know you are moving -- perhaps you shouldn't be doing it!

.
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post #80 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

1984 has long since passed, Apple are different these days. They are a corporation. That said, they are not like Google. Apple are more honest and upfront about how they are using our data. That's the difference. And unlike Google and FaceBook, Apple give you a choice.

I actually think Apple recognizes that protecting user privacy, and not (ab)using what user data they do have, is good business. So, while many may think all companies are the same, and will do anything for a buck, they might consider that for some companies, what they will do for that buck is not sell you out, because that makes more money for them in the long run. Not caving to publishers is, I think, part of a broader Apple strategy that has to do with maintaining a certain level of trust with customers.
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