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New Windows 7 ad criticizes Apple's lack of Blu-ray support on Mac - Page 4

post #121 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by OskiO View Post

Maybe MS thinks you will keep your XBOX connected to the Internet 100% of the time and there will be times when you won't have your laptop connected to the Internet.

Or maybe they are just such a big company that the left and right hands never talk.

I bet MS wants to put Blu-Ray capability on the X-box. I also bet that Sony isn't letting MS put Blu-Ray in the X-box. The X-box would have complete parity with PS3, meaning that Sony loses a competitive advantage.
post #122 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scaramanga89 View Post

Yes, but if you have the disc you can watch it on EITHER your laptop or your big tv, or your mates, tv, or your aunties tv...........

Yes, but if you have a digital image and an inexpensive app ServeToMe you can watch it on:

your laptop, desktopS, HDTVS, iPhoneS, iPadS, at your mates TV, your Auntie's TV, at any WiFi HotSpot, or over 3G in the middle of a park.

See, that's the magic of streamed digital contentment, you can take it with you -- without taking it with you!

.
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post #123 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

I'll agree with you when I can stream Avatar and many thousands of other films with 45mbit 1080p video with lossless DTS Master audio, and 4-10 hours of behind the scenes extras on tap.

I think there needs to be a distinction about what content suits the distribution method. Blu-Ray is a good option for archival of movies you love and want to keep in the highest quality. The vast majority of content is disposable so there's no need to use 45mbit video with lossless audio. That's in the region of the bitrate used for intermediate video editing formats, although for HD that will be 150-200mbits. Distribution bitrates should be around 1/10th of an editing bitrate due to the inter-frame compression so the absolute upper bound for 1080p H.264 would be 15mbits but you will get away with 8mbits, especially using high-end encoders, not the junk they ship with Quicktime.

The widely accepted definition of broadband is 4mbits so we're in the region of 720p streaming and that's enough for all disposable content. For the odd movie here and there, people will go out and buy the disc but digital content still outsells it.

Blu-Ray is currently at 25 million units, DVD is at 340 million. Digital sales is harder to work out per year but it has risen exponentially and totals are 450 million TV episodes, 100 million movies. The iTunes store is only 7 years old so even if they sold the same amount every year, which isn't the case it's 14 million movie sales per year. Given that it is in fact increasing exponentially, it's pretty certain iTunes outsold Blu-Ray this year and that's just one store.

Apple have the statistics and know which technologies are right to bet on. Blu-Ray might be the strongest horse in the race for physical media distribution but this race ends soon and a new one is going and Apple are getting their head-start as usual.
post #124 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

...
Here's the problem with the Blu-ray step in that technology advancement chain: unlike the others in the chain, it offers NO increase in convenience relative to its predecessor (the DVD). Furthermore, with respect to quality, its predecessor (the DVD) is GOOD ENOUGH for the majority of users most of the time. That means that the value proposition for most people to try Blu-ray is really unclear, hence a slower penetration for Blu-ray than the technologies that preceded it. Then along comes downloads, which undeniably ratchet the convenience factor up to unprecedented levels. But the quality factor remains at DVD level for now, or perhaps even at SD level! But people are using it anyway and liking it. I rent shows or movies on demand via Comcast all of the time, and I never pay the extra buck for high definition. You may, but I would wager most people choose like I do.

Here's my take: most people will skip purchasing a Blu-ray player of any kind, unless it comes along for the ride with a game player. And many of those will never purchase or rent a Blu-ray disk.
...

Thompson

I don't buy Blu-Ray player or drive myself. Mine came with the PS3 which is good enough and have been highly praised in term of quality. Most importantly, I don't buy Blu-Ray disc either unless it is too good to watch it streaming like movies I don't mind watching again in the future like the Bourne collection or one or two Denzel's movie. I don't regard special features on disc appealing at all. The discs are dead to me, taking up spaces in my place and only used once. HDD is cheap nowadays and I could carry movies on a USB stick if I want to but I just watch them on my iPad on the move. Everything is on download regardless of legality.

Besides, just how many built PC came with the Blu-ray drives anyway. I know mine don't even when I build my PC myself.
post #125 of 411
Here are a few reasons I've heard about why BR isn't on Macs:

- SJ wants control

- SJ doesn't want to pay royalties for BR

- SJ wants to dip his fingers into the revenue pot.

- BR will cut into iTunes revenue.

Here's my response: It's business.

Apple is a business. Steve Jobs, as a CEO is trying to make money for Apple. If the royalties are going to adversely affect profits, then SJ shouldn't do it.

Consumers should vote with their wallets. If consumers vote in favor of BR, SJ will put it on the Mac. He may be a lot of things, but he isn't an idiot when it comes to business.
post #126 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

Movies on Television... Video Tape... DVD... Blu-Ray... Streaming and/or Downloads...

Here's the problem with the Blu-ray step in that technology advancement chain: unlike the others in the chain, it offers NO increase in convenience relative to its predecessor (the DVD). Furthermore, with respect to quality, its predecessor (the DVD) is GOOD ENOUGH for the majority of users most of the time. That means that the value proposition for most people to try Blu-ray is really unclear, hence a slower penetration for Blu-ray than the technologies that preceded it. Then along comes downloads, which undeniably ratchet the convenience factor up to unprecedented levels. But the quality factor remains at DVD level for now, or perhaps even at SD level! But people are using it anyway and liking it. I rent shows or movies on demand via Comcast all of the time, and I never pay the extra buck for high definition. You may, but I would wager most people choose like I do.

Here's my take: most people will skip purchasing a Blu-ray player of any kind, unless it comes along for the ride with a game player. And many of those will never purchase or rent a Blu-ray disk.

For those of you that do otherwise, I understand your motivation... but I don't think you will ever be in the majority.


Thompson

It is however reverse downgrade or backward in the quality of experience-but maybe that is a reflection and proof of de-evolution. Or maybe our brains are being fried by all this wireless crap and since we are on the go go go go and more go all the time we can't take a couple hours to really enjoy the artistry of a great movie-scratch that maybe it is a niche market since the biggest movies from Hollywood - well a bluray version probably - well most definitely don't even deserve a bluray transfer - nothing to gain- (there are exceptions though few-ex Avatar) - maybe this whole thing can just be attributed to people settling for bad taste - i mean look at the last decade - bad taste is the latest hot with everything from music, to movies, cars....
we should all think different.
Ya know I bet apple would have supported the bluray in their macs during that campain. They were quite higher end then.... God i miss those days when every moron on the planet had a windoze machine-now they all seem to have iphones and ipads just one thing has not changed they are still....
post #127 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

I've seen BlueRay and I really like it from a quality perspective, especially for visual feasts like "Avatar", "Lord of the Rings", "The Matrix", etc. But the lion's share of my movie watching is not concerned with movies like those, and most of them are rented not purchased. Put those two things together, and I find that convenience trumps quality the majority of the time. That is, I don't want to go to Blockbuster to rent movies anymore. I want to click a button from the comfort of my couch. If the downside is that for those few movies I want to actually purchase and download, I end up with 720p rather than 1080p, you know... I'm pretty much OK with that.

It sometimes seems like people who are videophiles and demand the highest quality tend to not even acknowledge or understand that when it comes to viewing your typical flick, the majority of folks value convenience over pixel density. I think it is fairly obvious that long before BlueRay technology hits the mainstream at the same scale that the DVD format did before it (i.e. "ubiquitous" as opposed to just "popular") the more convenient streaming methods will supersede it. Heck, it may only be a few years off before you can even stream the equivalent quality. In other words, I think that BlueRay never will hit the mainstream on THAT large a scale. Oh it will probably be popular enough to justify its existence, but I doubt that every middle class home in the USA will have a player, let alone 2 or 3.




I doubt that Apple makes its marketing decisions based on petulance, in spite of how it may feel to someone who really really wants a capability that they aren't providing. And I don't think it's necessarily all about the money either (certainly that is a factor). I think that they consider engineering trade-offs and all kinds of other things that never come to light. I'm not trying to be an Apple apologist here. I'm just saying that I think your perspective is influenced by our lack of insight into the Apple decision process as well as your strong desire for BlueRay.

Thompson

Well! Harumph! If you're going to make rational, considered posts -- it's off to the ignore list you go.

... I can't afford to waste time on posts like this!

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post #128 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post

What movie?

Crank 2.
post #129 of 411
It all rings pretty hollow when Apple is enjoying blockbuster Mac sales.

Microsloth is no longer a factor, anyway. The REAL competition of this new era of the merging of mobile with desktop will be between Apple and Google.
post #130 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by kabelad View Post

you might want to inform netflix and blockbuster. they haven't heard that news yet.

Blockbuster filed for bankrupcy a couple months ago.
post #131 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scaramanga89 View Post

The reference is the previous year's sales, as part of total DVD sales. If it netted half a billion in revenue, I think it's got some legs mate.

Well, post the absolute sales numbers so we can see, otherwise, for all we know, a 100% increase means it went from 1 to 2
post #132 of 411
once again, microsoft is showing how behind the times and out of touch they are with users these days ... especially those with portable gear and media consumption.
post #133 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splash-reverse View Post

I don't buy Blu-Ray player or drive myself. Mine came with the PS3 which is good enough and have been highly praised in term of quality. Most importantly, I don't buy Blu-Ray disc either unless it is too good to watch it streaming like movies I don't mind watching again in the future like the Bourne collection or one or two Denzel's movie. I don't regard special features on disc appealing at all. The discs are dead to me, taking up spaces in my place and only used once. HDD is cheap nowadays and I could carry movies on a USB stick if I want to but I just watch them on my iPad on the move. Everything is on download regardless of legality.

Besides, just how many built PC came with the Blu-ray drives anyway. I know mine don't even when I build my PC myself.

So you are agreeing with me, right?

Thompson
post #134 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidcarswell View Post

It is however reverse downgrade or backward in the quality of experience-but maybe that is a reflection and proof of de-evolution... *SNIP*

All of which I agree with, but that's what I've been trying to say. When it comes to taking in a quick rented flick, which is usually watched to take in a (hopefully!) good story, convenience trumps quality MOST of the time. (I didn't say ALL of the time.)

For instance, I get a really really huge kick out of the movie "Forrest Gump", and I am quite sure that my enjoyment of it would not have been significantly enhanced by HD or fancy surround sound... the story transcended the pixels and soundtrack. For some specific movies, that is not the case. But most are that way.

That's just the reality, mate! ;-)


Thompson
post #135 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChickenPoPie View Post

once again, microsoft is showing how behind the times and out of touch they are with users these days ... especially those with portable gear and media consumption.

which is the downfall of todays civilization. everyone in such a hurry - no time to do anything yet get nothing done and rude, demanding and obnoxious - what we all need to do is take some time - put down our dammed iphones, ipads, twitting (does anyone recall what a twit use to mean?), stop texting, key-padding, emailing, sexting, suing, driving, eating fast food, road raging, etc... and sit our fat asses down with friends and family in front of a big screen hdtv with a great long movie and a nice dinner. At least on an occasion. Hell - that is what we all effin need. Some down time, relaxation and good times with those we love-too bad apple can't box that up for us... but i don't guess we would or will ever buy that... and with the apple tax... whew...
post #136 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

All of which I agree with, but that's what I've been trying to say. When it comes to taking in a quick rented flick, which is usually watched to take in a (hopefully!) good story, convenience trumps quality MOST of the time. (I didn't say ALL of the time.)

For instance, I get a really really huge kick out of the movie "Forrest Gump", and I am quite sure that my enjoyment of it would not have been significantly enhanced by HD or fancy surround sound... the story transcended the pixels and soundtrack. For some specific movies, that is not the case. But most are that way.

That's just the reality, mate! ;-)


Thompson

i hear ya - but hope ya get to do it on occasion - if not at home at least with a friend... but it is the sad sad facts of today...
:-(
cheers
post #137 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

Movies on Television... Video Tape... DVD... Blu-Ray... Streaming and/or Downloads...

I just want to very quickly expand upon what Thompson was saying.

The changes in media and convenience was a major reason why adoption occurred. From VHS to DVD, it was very clear: No more rewinding, better quality, better durability (anyone who has worked in a movie rental store before knows this), and a smaller package.

Now, you make the next logical jump up, and that is DVD to Blu-Ray. Realistically, you only have a couple of benefits: better video experience if you have a higher quality TV, and a better audio experience if you have a higher-end audio setup. It is those ifs that get in the way. Now, is it being adopted, yes it is. There are people who firmly believe it is the future of watching movies. The problem is that it doesn't solve a problem with the prior format, so they started adding features (internet connected devices, live chat, watching it from different angles while in the movie, etc) to try to sway people to buy.

Now, you look at Downloading content. It does solve a problem: the actual media. You can back that up (i.e. Time Machine) perfectly legally, as well as have it installed on multiple portable devices. That is something that the movie industry doesn't want, which is why they are pouring millions of dollars into getting Blu-Ray to be heavily adopted.

Now, does Downloadable Content feature the same quality of video or audio? No, but that isn't the point. Will Blu-Ray be around for many more years? Probably, and yes I think probably around 10 years. Will Apple adopt it into its computers: Maybe, depending on licensing and other factors that us mere mortals will not know about. I just know that for me, DVD is just fine for renting and what not, and when I can buy movies and store them in a separate place, like a NAS, then I will go to Downloading Content. That is me, and only me though.

Last thing, then I will stop. ;-) If history is any measure of what happens, then DVDs/Blu-Ray will go the way of the Dodo, in favor of Downloadable Content; just like it was for the CD.

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post #138 of 411
So What, big deal
post #139 of 411
Go ahead! Watch that blu-ray with your special eyes!

Lol.


Can I notice the difference? Yes.

Do I really care about the difference? Not really.

Am I willing to give up the difference, to gain all the advantage of using digital files instead of physical media? You bet!!

The only thing I would want blu-ray for would be to be able to rip blu-ray content into my digital library. And I wouldn't be saving it as 1080p! Fortunately, this is rarely necessary.

When we first got HD, we tacked on a blu-ray player so we could get "the full experience". Whatever. I think we have 3 blu-ray disks now. Whoopee.
post #140 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

When it comes to renting movies, or even purchasing them, the majority of people value convenience over quality most of the time (with specific exceptions for the occasional visual feast that you may watch more than once to revel in its visual glory). But as for the folks that don't fall in that category, i.e. they want ALL of their movies, purchased or rented, to be 1080p ALL the time...
why is it they can't see that most folks aren't like that?

Thompson

People don't care about high quality all the time. They just want their purchased media to play wherever they're used to consuming it. Today it plays on a 60" screen. Tomorrow it plays on a laptop.
post #141 of 411
While most points made here for and against Blu-Ray make a lot of sense, I think the main issue for this thread is Blu-Ray on a laptop, because that is the context of the ad. I'm not aware of any laptop under 17" that has a resolution 1920x1080 or higher. Anything less makes Blu-Ray overkill on a laptopand the Windows 7 ad is specifically talking about Blu-Ray on a laptop. If you watch a Blu-Ray movie on a laptop with less than 1080p capable resolution, you're just wasting battery juice, and Apple's 720p HD downloads don't look so bad.

Now, if the ad featured an anthropomorphic iMac chillin' with a Windows 7 desktop and talking about the iMac's lack of Blu-Ray, that would be a valid argument, and something worthy of a discussion on the merits of Blu-Ray vs. not Blu-Ray.

BTW. That ad was totally unbelievablea badminton shuttlecock glued to a couple of soup cans is not a feasible means of air travel. And power supply cooling fans have nowhere near enough power to get that all off the ground. Totally fake. Geez.
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post #142 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scaramanga89 View Post

I've read a lot of your posts here over the last couple of years mate

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post #143 of 411
Granted I do not know very much about BR licensing. If Apple wanted to put BR players in their computers, what is the licensing required. Isn't the manufacturer of the player device that Apple would be purchasing already paying the licensing fee?

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post #144 of 411
I'm so sick of all the "I have no need for this" comments. What, just because you have no need of it, no one else does? So should car manufacturers stop making pickup trucks because you will never need one? I know that for anyone living in the USA at least, streaming essentially sucks in comparison to BR. We just don't have the bandwidth for streaming quality close to BR. I know that there are many consumers that could care less about quality and only about convenience, and hey good for you, but there are still plenty of people out there who genuinely appreciate the superior quality that BR offers. If Macs were to support BR I certainly would not travel with a library of discs, but to know that my 27" iMac at home could play them in all their glory, as well as rip them to a digital format that maintains the bulk of that quality, would be greatly appreciated. Also, if Mac supported BR, I would certainly replace my WD Media Player as well as my BR player, for a Mac Mini. For people that keep touting "streaming is the future", they are not understanding how far in the future it really is as far as a complete replacement of physical media. The key issue is access. When limitless bandwidth is as prevalent as a power socket then, maybe streaming might supplant physical media, but until then it will always be inferior in many ways. With physical media, I can convert it into whatever digital format I want and stream it to myself through a variety of different means. If I don't have the physical media to work with then I am at the mercy of my ISP, and the content providers. Until people can access Gigabit, or at least, triple digit Megabit connections everywhere from the 30,000 miles in the air to sitting on their couch, BR as a physical medium isn't going anywhere.
post #145 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidcarswell View Post

HOLLER! Audio is something to be amazed by - and when done right the digital transfer can be supreme but when its not well its about as equal to its dvd counter... Some people do enjoy the experience of a movie and some people would just as well download a 200p wmv file of a bootleg cam shoot of the movie in the theatre with people getting up and throwing popcorn in the video. High brow - low brow.

'Twas an evening in October, I'll confess I wasn't sober,
I was carting home a load with manly pride,
When my feet began to stutter and I fell into the gutter,
And a pig came up and lay down by my side.
Then I lay there in the gutter and my heart was all a-flutter,
A high-toned lady, passing by, did chance to say:
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses,"
Then the pig got up and slowly walked away.

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post #146 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

All my movie watching on the plane has been a wonderful experience on the iPad... even when people lean back their seats! :-)

Thompson

I haven't had the pleasure of flying on a plane with my iPad.

I choose to forgo the pleasure of an airport security check.

It really irritates when the attendant walks out and snaps his rubber gloves...

.
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post #147 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Eggleston View Post

I just want to very quickly expand upon what Thompson was saying.

The changes in media and convenience was a major reason why adoption occurred. From VHS to DVD, it was very clear: No more rewinding, better quality, better durability (anyone who has worked in a movie rental store before knows this), and a smaller package.

Thanks Mike, you nailed it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Eggleston View Post

Now, you make the next logical jump up, and that is DVD to Blu-Ray. Realistically, you only have a couple of benefits: better video experience if you have a higher quality TV, and a better audio experience if you have a higher-end audio setup. It is those ifs that get in the way.

For me, its worse than just those "ifs". I've had a television and audio system capable of all of this for almost 5 years. Since it's convenient and not much more expensive, I've also had digital cable with HD channels. When there is a show I want to watch on both standard definition or high definition versions of the same channel, I'll opt for the high definition version every time.

But for the first several years that I had the high end capability, there were several issues with Blu-ray that were obstacles to my participation:

(1) Blu-ray players were relatively expensive, as were the disks,
(2) it was unclear how the format wars would turn out, and
(3) there was very little content available in that format, etc.

Finally, as always happens in technology, these issues are clearing up. If that were the end of the story, I'd happily purchase a Blu-ray player and move into the next phase. But that's not the end of the story. During the last few years, video on demand has arisen from any number of sources... cable providers, Netflix, iTunes, Hulu, the list goes on and on. Not having to drive to Blockbuster and see whether what I want to watch is "in" is a valuable thing to me. Most of the movies I watch are rentals or (if purchased) are sentimental favorites, and almost all of them are stories that transcend the pixels and sounds. For me, it just doesn't make sense to purchase a Blu-ray player for the "opportunity" to go out of my way acquiring physical media (Blockbuster, Netflix by mail, Wal Mart) for the rare times that the cinematic experience makes a significant difference. (Videophiles can't understand that last statement.) It would be like building the church for Easter Sunday. The bottom line is that Blu-ray missed its window of opportunity for me, and now I'm looking forward to the days when streaming improves, and we get the best of both worlds.


Thompson
post #148 of 411
In response to ripping a blu-ray disc for later viewing...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scaramanga89 View Post

Because that's a lot less [sic] hassle than sliding in a disc. Any excuse to not admit your'e on the losing side for once.

Sliding in a disc - blu-ray or otherwise - is more hassle when Netflix owns it. I don't want to feel compelled to watch the movie on Netflix's schedule or on the device with the blu-ray drive. I'd rather rip and return, and watch it later at the location of my choosing.
post #149 of 411
The first thing they teach you in Sales 101 is to sell benefits, not features. The second thing they teach you is to overcome objections. By not overcoming objections to those who want a Blu-ray player, Apple leaves the door open to others.

One technology does not replace another. Streaming and Blu-ray can easily co-exist. Each has their advantages and disadvantages depending upon the situation.

As of today, streaming quality sucks in comparison to Blu-ray. Furthermore, if I buy Blu-ray for my home system, I don't want to have to download something else to play the same movie on the computer. And not all Blu-rays come with a DVD or digital copy.

Apple used to promote themselves as selling the best quality and having the best user experience. Today, Blu-ray has the best quality. So IMO, Apple should support Blu-ray and if it doesn't want to, then it should at least support it in the OS so that 3rd parties can provide what users want.

There are still some of us who want the home theatre large screen, multi-channel sound experience. What I'd like to see Apple do is not only support Blu-ray, but perhaps also support wirelessly streaming that picture and audio to the TV and audio processor. 720p video that has digital blocking artifacts in dark scenes might be fine for a 14 year old watching Jackass, but it's not acceptable for serious viewing.
post #150 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I haven't had the pleasure of flying on a plane with my iPad.

I choose to forgo the pleasure of an airport security check.

It really irritates when the attendant walks out and snaps his rubber gloves...

.

Cool thing about iPads: they get to stay in your carry-on through the Xray machine. You don't have to monkey with them and pull them out into a box on their own.

Awesome travel companions!

Thompson
post #151 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scaramanga89 View Post

Because that's a lot less hassle than sliding in a disc. Any excuse to not admit your'e on the losing side for once.


I'l bet if you surveyed a random sample of Mac owners, not the fanatics on the boards here, and asked them did the want BR the majority would say yes. I'd say 99% of the Mac Mini crowd would immediately.

Just admit Lord Jobs is stroking you cos he cant extract enough blood from your wallet through Blu_ray and move on.

BTW, I'm a Mac user, who bought a PS3 just to play Blu-Rays.

You're dead wrong.

I'm just waiting for the day the physical media is gone. Never liked cd's or dvd's. I love being able to simply download. I can't even remember the last time I watched a dvd or slid either a dvd or a cd in my computer.
post #152 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

In response to ripping a blu-ray disc for later viewing...


Sliding in a disc - blu-ray or otherwise - is more hassle when Netflix owns it. I don't want to feel compelled to watch the movie on Netflix's schedule or on the device with the blu-ray drive. I'd rather rip and return, and watch it later at the location of my choosing.

I canceled Netflix because I was tired of getting damaged dvd's. You get all ready to spend the evening watching a film and get halfway through and...
post #153 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by hlfnlsn View Post

I'm so sick of all the "I have no need for this" comments. What, just because you have no need of it, no one else does?

I think that some of us have a more moderate tone towards Blu-ray... at least we only say "most people don't need it" rather than "nobody needs it". Not only is there sound philosophy to back that up (see earlier arguments) but the data seems to be backing it up as well. (While relatively "popular", Blu-ray is far far from "ubiquitous".) And if a company like Apple relies on such data to help guide its engineering efforts, can you really blame them?

Thompson
post #154 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I haven't had the pleasure of flying on a plane with my iPad.

I choose to forgo the pleasure of an airport security check.

It really irritates when the attendant walks out and snaps his rubber gloves...

.

Just where do you keep your iPad??
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post #155 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by hlfnlsn View Post

I'm so sick of all the "I have no need for this" comments. BR as a physical medium isn't going anywhere.

Can I quote you in a couple of years? LOL
post #156 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scaramanga89 View Post

Why should Apple support something just because you want it? Why should Apple support something that competes with their focus and goals, and doesnt positively affect their bottom line.

That sums it up, it's got nothing at all to do with the customer, but you TRY and play it off as if it were.

Youve missed the point. Companies arent working for you, they are working for themselves. There goal is to make money, so your single desire isnt enough to warrant their interest. They go where the money is.

Again, why should any company warp their goals of trying to increase their profits to satisfy your needs? Do you put this much emphasis on other companies to be like everyone else if it satisfied your single desire?
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #157 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

720p video that has digital blocking artifacts in dark scenes might be fine for a 14 year old watching Jackass, but it's not acceptable for serious viewing.

Hey now, I resemble that remark!!!

No, seriously, that statement is an example of what I described earlier: a quote that indicates its author doesn't realize that it is quite normal (nay, in fact, common!) to NOT be a videophile. Sure, I'll take 1080p over 720p any day, all other things being equal. But make me futz with obtaining, storing, and going back & forth for physical media and I'll opt for the 720p. And I'll do it quite seriously (even while watching Jackass). :-)

Thompson
post #158 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scaramanga89 View Post

Yes, but if you have the disc you can watch it on EITHER your laptop or your big tv, or your mates, tv, or your aunties tv...........

Am I to gather that you would leave your laptop with your auntie so she could watch Blu-ray movies when you are not around? Or do you have to be present?
post #159 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

Hey now, I resemble that remark!!!

No, seriously, that statement is an example of what I described earlier: a quote that indicates its author doesn't realize that it is quite normal (nay, in fact, common!) to NOT be a videophile. Sure, I'll take 1080p over 720p any day, all other things being equal. But make me futz with obtaining, storing, and going back & forth for physical media and I'll opt for the 720p. And I'll do it quite seriously (even while watching Jackass). :-)

Thompson

Even a statement of 720p v. 1080p is relative. Last time I checked iTunes 720p had a higher bitrate than YouTubes 1080p.

Its funny, the people that clamor for Blu-ray on a consumer notebook or 1080p over 720p typically have no idea what they are wanting, expect that they want the highest valued marketing term without ever looking at the rest of the puzzle.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #160 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

Only could a die hard Apple defender turn the ability to play the highest quality HD video on the planet in a negative point. Well done there, you may now collect your pay cheque.

You can play that quality without an optical too though by copying it off the disc. You can store about 30 on a hard drive and it's silent. You are suggesting that media with a storage density of 7.5 Gbit/in² is better than media with storage density of 250 Gbit/in² and should be marketed as a major plus in a single advert.

- optical is slow
- optical is noisy
- optical is external media and can be damaged
- optical is less responsive when interacting with a movie, especially rewind
- optical makes laptops larger and heavier
- optical drains power faster
- optical generates more heat inside a machine
- optical (with the exception of DVDRAM) is write-all-at-once media

You are right that Blu-Ray contains the highest video quality distributed to consumers but when there are so many downsides for that benefit, it's not worth it for anything other than your favourite movies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vvswarup

Consumers should vote with their wallets. If consumers vote in favor of BR, SJ will put it on the Mac. He may be a lot of things, but he isn't an idiot when it comes to business.

Business is certainly a part of it but it's also about cutting legacy fat. The more Apple supports discs, it adversely affects their hardware designs and costs. If it costs $100 to design and build an optical drive into a laptop, they pass that cost onto the consumer, which affects their market.

If they ship a machine without an optical drive when everyone else has one, it becomes a flaw. The reality is that very few people are even using optical drives in computers. People watch Blu-Ray movies on TVs for the most part and few people even take computers travelling and if they do, they take netbooks with no optical drives.
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