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Angry Birds maker apologizes for Android fragmentation issues

post #1 of 269
Thread Starter 
The developer of "Angry Birds," a top-selling iPhone game, reported that bringing the title to Android devices ended up more difficult than anticipated due to fragmentation within the open platform.

According to a CNET report, the title's developer Rovio Mobile apologized for poor performance across a variety of Android devices, explaining that, "despite our efforts, we were unsuccessful in delivering optimal performance."

The company added, "So far, we have hesitated to create multiple versions of Angry Birds for the Android platform. But judging by the feedback we have received, we feel that by providing a lightweight solution, we are doing a favor for our fans. We are currently developing a lighter solution to run Angry Birds on lower-end Android devices."

Openly fragmented

The issues highlights the problem of platform fragmentation that is endemic to widely-licensed software platforms designed to run on nearly any makers' hardware. Apple chief executive described the problem as a "daunting challenge" for developers in comments to analysts at the company's most recent earnings report in October.

"Google loves to characterize Android as open and iPhone as closed. We see this disingenuous and clouding the difference," Jobs said. However, rather than focusing on the range of different hardware sold with Android, Jobs noted a parallel problem: a software-oriented fragmentation of the user's experience across different devices.

"Unlike Windows, where PCs have the same interface, Android is very fragmented," Jobs said. "HTC and Motorola install proprietary user interfaces to differentiate themselves. The user left to figure it out. Compare this to iPhone where every handset works the same."

In defense of variety

Jobs cited a popular Twitter client Android app, saying the developer "had to contend with 100 different versions of software on 244 different handsets. That's a daunting challenge," he said. "Many Android apps work only on selected handsets, or selected Android versions. This is for handsets that shipped 12 months ago. Compare with iPhone, where are two versions to test against, the current and most recent predecessor."

That developer later suggested in a blog posting that Jobs' comments were exaggerated, noting that in its experience with deploying a Twitter client, it was not "a nightmare developing on Android," and that "we only have two guys developing on Android TweetDeck so that shows how small an issue fragmentation is."

Android advocates point out that fragmentation of Android is, if anything, a feature, as it offers users choices. That's the same line of reasoning advocates of Microsoft Windows used in the PC market. However, it's also the marketing line Microsoft unsuccessfully tried to use in selling its PlaysForSure devices against the iPod, and again with Windows Mobile phones against the iPhone and Tablet PC and Slate PC devices prior to the iPad.

Performance and user experience

Prior to returning to Apple in 1996, Jobs said in an interview that "the PC wars are over. Done. Microsoft won a long time ago," a sentiment he repeated in downplaying the rivalry between Apple and Microsoft after taking the helm of Apple shortly afterward. Over the last decade however, Jobs has led a resurgence of the Mac platform over generic PCs running Windows, achieving a much higher rate of growth compared to the overall PC industry.

With the iPod, iPhone and iPad, Apple has reversed its underdog position entirely, successfully entering the entrenched and highly competitive smartphone market and immediately taking significant market share. With iPods and iPads, Apple completely dominates the media player and tablet markets, standing up to major efforts unsuccessfully led by Microsoft with its PlaysForSure, Zune, and Slate PC initiatives.

A key aspect of Apple's success in mobile devices comes from delivering a strong platform that is easy for developers to target and which delivers a consistent and reliable experience for users. Google's Android, like PlaysForSure, attempts to create a flexible software platform that multiple manufacturers can use to deliver products that work similarly.

Multiple layers of fragmentation for Android

However, one problem is that manufacturers themselves don't want to cede all control to a common platform. As Jobs noted, each Android maker is seeking to differentiate its offerings with different skins that make the look and feel of their products unique.

Individual Android makers also have their own ideas about how to reach competitive price points. HTC shaves off costs by using cheaper but lower quality 16-bit color displays with less accurate touch screens, while Motorola has typically chosen higher-end full color displays more like Apple's iPhone. Samsung features its own brand of AMOLED screens.

The Android OS is faced with supporting all of these, resulting in situations where, for example, Google's photo browser only shows graphics at the lower quality level of HTC's displays, leaving Motorola's superior 24-bit color screen underutilized. It is also lacking the optimized performance AMOLED could deliver were the OS expressly designed for it.

Additionally, Google appears uninterested in preventing service providers from also differentiating the Android products they carry, resulting in issues where Verizon Wireless has created exclusive deals for Android titles such as Skype that will only work on its phones and not Android devices from other makers. Service providers are also competing with Google in operating their own app stores.

Different hardware makers and service providers also choose to support different versions of Android on their devices, and either roll out updates late or fail to ever release updates for some models. This results in a situation where developers can't rely on the latest features being available on the phones users have. Additionally, the wide range of performance across the broad offerings of Android makers results in devices that can't run high performance titles (like games) acceptably, the issue expressed by Angry Birds' developer.

While successive generations of iPhones keep getting faster and gaining unique features such as iPhone 4's higher resolution screen and gyroscope, Apple has a much easier time abstracting away those differences for developers because it makes both the hardware and the software, and only has to manage users' experience across a few models. Customers are also more aware of what they can expect when choosing between iPhone models, as there are only at most two different generations ever available to buy at once.

With Android, users have no way of comparing the potential experience a given phone can deliver because there are so many different variables to consider, and many of these are not exposed in a way buyers can even compare, such as the difference between CPUs or amount of RAM available. Also, unlike PCs, where the price might give some general idea of the level of performance users could expect from it, mobile devices like smartphones are often sold with carrier subsides, masking the actual cost of the hardware.

Microsoft Windows vs Google Android

Microsoft has made managing users' expectations across a vast array of PC hardware its core competency, strictly enforcing limits on PC makers that prevented them from fractionalizing their offerings too much. Microsoft forbids its partners from making material changes to the Windows desktop and overall user interface, and standardizes hardware features for users. Despite all these efforts, it still can't match the tight integration Apple provides on the Mac, something Apple has successfully used to its advantage in advertising its desktop and notebook systems.

In contrast, while Google spends a lot of time accommodating differences in hardware between Android licensees, it has chosen not to enforce much control over the user's experience, allowing different companies to deliver Android phones that look and work so differently they could be easily confused for non-Android devices. There's also no standardized level of performance across Android devices, a problem that complicates the deployment of complex apps such as games.

The problem is also an issue for enterprise deployment, where the vast array of differences across Android devices makes it hard to support phones users select on their own. No significant number of Android phones support hardware encryption yet, making the entire platform unsupported by Exchange Server unless the security policy of the network is weakened.

Apple was able to simply add hardware encryption across the board with the iPhone 3GS back in 2009, rapidly resulting in the majority of the iPhone installed base supporting the feature years before Android, which still has no minimum security standard in place for new licensees of the platform.

Apple has similarly rolled out standardized new features such as the iPhone 4's gyroscope, Retina Display and FaceTime, which developers can target across a broad installed base. Android makers can introduce unique new hardware features, but developers can't count on a significant installed base having them, making it difficult to invest the efforts to target those features in their apps, and making it hard to advertise features that don't work on the majority of Android devices available.

Google has also avoided the "curated" degree of management of Android's app store, allowing other developers to list tons of unauthorized copies of titles that pretend to be associated with legitimate titles. A search for "Angry Birds" in Android Market reveals lots of "apps" that use the game's name and graphics to sell their own products, and in some cases even distribute malicious attacks.
post #2 of 269
This story is more proof that Jobs has no clue as to what he is talking about!!

(yes... this is sarcasm)
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post #3 of 269
If I were an android fan, I would be pretty pissed about the fragmentation, and how some developers have no choice but to develop for the lowest common denominator.

I'd probably be so mad, dammit, that I would post vitriolic messages on iOS forums disparaging iPhones and Apple products in general.

Oh wait ...
post #4 of 269
Completely overblown statements made by people who obviously favor the iPhone.

There isn't even a paid version of the game for Android, and the only thing that affects performance is the stupid ads! Literally, in airplane mode, the game is as smooth as silk. Turn 3g on, get ads, and watch the game's framerates drop immensely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by steve jobs

"Unlike Windows, where PCs have the same interface, Android is very fragmented," Jobs said. "HTC and Motorola install proprietary user interfaces to differentiate themselves. The user left to figure it out. Compare this to iPhone where every handset works the same."

he's talking about the launchers and phone apps, all of which can easily be replaced, and don't come anywhere CLOSE to the impact he describes.

Articles like this are here to only reassure people made the "correct" decision in going with an iPhone. There is no CORRECT decision! It's all about what you like!
post #5 of 269
tell me something i don't know.


Android = the Windows of mobile.
post #6 of 269
iOS also has some fragmentation, just not as bad as Android. 3 screen resolutions, 4 generations of processing power on the iPhone, a few on iPod Touches and of course 1 generation of iPads. Different memory sizes.

Again, not nearly as bad, but there is something.
post #7 of 269
So why are Roxio still wasting the money they make from iOS customers on Android versions when they could be putting their efforts into improving and making more special edition versions for the people who are paying their bills?

Enough time wasting, Roxio should get back to the platform that matters.
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post #8 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

So why are Roxio still wasting the money they make from iOS customers on Android versions when they could be putting their efforts into improving and making more special edition versions for the people who are paying their bills?

Enough time wasting, Roxio should get back to the platform that matters.

The platform that matters?
post #9 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

Completely overblown statements made by people who obviously favor the iPhone.

There isn't even a paid version of the game for Android, and the only thing that affects performance is the stupid ads! Literally, in airplane mode, the game is as smooth as silk. Turn 3g on, get ads, and watch the game's framerates drop immensely.

Well, the ads have become a defining aspect of the platform, since it's the only way for developers to make money, so, even if it is the ads, it's still entirely relevant. And, Rovio did say fragmentation caused them problems, as did many commenters on their blog. The sooner people come out of denial about the problems inherent in Android, the happier they will be.
post #10 of 269
Really?

Tell that to ID Software.

Rage HD is available in HD and SD versions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post

iOS also has some fragmentation, just not as bad as Android. 3 screen resolutions, 4 generations of processing power on the iPhone, a few on iPod Touches and of course 1 generation of iPads. Different memory sizes.

Again, not nearly as bad, but there is something.
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post #11 of 269
So yeah. Lowest common denominator for devs for Android, or reduced feature set or ignore the part of the Android market that don't support the features you want to include in your app. Those are all solutions for addressing the "freedom" of developing for Android. Conversely, you have roughly 85 different handset hardware configs in the market currently, hopefully all of which follow standardization guidelines, with another 25 or so slated for the end of this year and beginning of next year. This doesn't of course reflect the practice of re-branding for each carrier - just the individual hardware models that are the basis for the re-branding.

So a dev has to ponder which platforms/models are most popular, which have the best feature set to optimize the app to, or which carriers show the most diligence in keeping the OS up-to-date for their customers. None of the US carriers are exemplars in that category.

Apple, well they just have to apply their draconian control on everything, offer a paltry one model per year, and so forth. With only 4 models of iPhone, the iPad and the iPod Touch how can Apple possibly hope to compete for app dev attention when there is so much "openness" to be had?!

/irony
post #12 of 269
ANDROID = What's the point in being OPEN when your phone is JUNK?
post #13 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

... launchers and phone apps, all of which can easily be replaced, and don't come anywhere CLOSE to the impact he describes.

I guarantee you that 95% (or more) of users will NOT find replacing the GUI trivial.
Again, devices built on the Android frameworks (let's stop calling it an OS please) appeal to chronic fiddlers and their unfortunate relatives who they talk into buying them.
post #14 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Really?

Tell that to John Carnack.

Rage HD is available in HD and SD versions.

John Carmack is somewhat inhuman when it comes to game programming. Almost all regular developers are "mere mortals"
post #15 of 269
And it's only going to get worse as more and more device makers come out with more and more "differentiated" hardware and proprietary software layers, and Google puts more and more versions of Android out there. Eventually Google may have to "close" the platform and actually sell licenses to Android in order to head off a growing chorus of user complaints over all the incompatibilities. This is the downside to Google using the Microsoft model for platform dominance. It worked for MS because they had a head start in a new market. But with Apple already having established the market and imbued it with its high level of reliability, simplicity and quality, it means the Droid has to fight an uphill battle. Droid may have pulled even in numbers, but the more numbers, the bigger the problems.
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post #16 of 269
Well, first off, I'm not sure if you're saying Apple is bad or not, but I think you are because your title says Android Open, Android ONE. I apologize if I misunderstood you (I'm not the best reader)

If you are being negative about Apple's decision to be "closed" and don't allow freedom, well, think about this. The article proves that too much openness is bad, but also, it's actually good that Apple is closed and not so much open. Here's an example story.

Let's say Android is a name of a 1 year old boy. We will also say iOS is another 1 year old boy. They both go to the same kindergarden later. They later go to elementary school. Both are very good friends. They later go to middle school. As they mentally change, Android wants freedom. His parents say no. iOS wants also wants some freedom, but his parents specifically say no. They lock him up in his room just so that iOS doesn't have any change of escaping.

In the course of the next few months, Android keeps asking for freedom. His parents say no, so Android runs away. iOS stays where is and continues his education.

Android goes to a poor town without any money. iOS goes to one of many famous universities. iOS gets a job. Android lives on the street. Android becomes a criminal. Android becomes a bad, control-less person (maniac). Without anyone to "control" him, he doesn't know what is a right choice or a wrong choice. Android regrets having too much freedom, living outside of the control area.

Yes, the story might sound stupid, but take this situation in your life. If you were given all the freedom in your life without any guardian, you might be lost.

In the story, Apple is like the parent of iOS, while Google is the parent of Android. Apple strictly locked iOS up, so that he doesn't run away. It's like Apple in real world. Apple doesn't let us have so much freedom. Apple is very strict, but they are like our "parents" to protect us and guide us through our life. Google, the parent of Android, just takes freedom as not seriously. Google doesn't lock up Android. They don't believe Android will just run away for freedom.

I hope we all get the message here. Too much freedom will make stuff, from operating systems to our life, very different. If you are a parent, will you let your kid have whatever they want? Even if it's something bad? Will you let your kid go anywhere they want? Even to somewhere illegal? NO! We care about our children, like how Apple cares about their iOS so that the customers can have a much better experience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LewysBlackmore View Post

So yeah. Lowest common denominator for devs for Android, or reduced feature set or ignore the part of the Android market that don't support the features you want to include in your app. Those are all solutions for addressing the "freedom" of developing for Android. Conversely, you have roughly 85 different handset hardware configs in the market currently, hopefully all of which follow standardization guidelines, with another 25 or so slated for the end of this year and beginning of next year. This doesn't of course reflect the practice of re-branding for each carrier - just the individual hardware models that are the basis for the re-branding.

So a dev has to ponder which platforms/models are most popular, which have the best feature set to optimize the app to, or which carriers show the most diligence in keeping the OS up-to-date for their customers. None of the US carriers are exemplars in that category.

Apple, well they just have to apply their draconian control on everything, offer a paltry one model per year, and so forth. With only 4 models of iPhone, the iPad and the iPod Touch how can Apple possibly hope to compete for app dev attention when there is so much "openness" to be had?!

/irony
post #17 of 269
jesus you lost me there.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by kimys1022 View Post

Well, first off, I'm not sure if you're saying Apple is bad or not, but I think you are because your title says Android Open, Android ONE. I apologize if I misunderstood you (I'm not the best reader)

If you are being negative about Apple's decision to be "closed" and don't allow freedom, well, think about this. The article proves that too much openness is bad, but also, it's actually good that Apple is closed and not so much open. Here's an example story.

Let's say Android is a name of a 1 year old boy. We will also say iOS is another 1 year old boy. They both go to the same kindergarden later. They later go to elementary school. Both are very good friends. They later go to middle school. As they mentally change, Android wants freedom. His parents say no. iOS wants also wants some freedom, but his parents specifically say no. They lock him up in his room just so that iOS doesn't have any change of escaping.

In the course of the next few months, Android keeps asking for freedom. His parents say no, so Android runs away. iOS stays where is and continues his education.

Android goes to a poor town without any money. iOS goes to one of many famous universities. iOS gets a job. Android lives on the street. Android becomes a criminal. Android becomes a bad, control-less person (maniac). Without anyone to "control" him, he doesn't know what is a right choice or a wrong choice. Android regrets having too much freedom, living outside of the control area.

Yes, the story might sound stupid, but take this situation in your life. If you were given all the freedom in your life without any guardian, you might be lost.

In the story, Apple is like the parent of iOS, while Google is the parent of Android. Apple strictly locked iOS up, so that he doesn't run away. It's like Apple in real world. Apple doesn't let us have so much freedom. Apple is very strict, but they are like our "parents" to protect us and guide us through our life. Google, the parent of Android, just takes freedom as not seriously. Google doesn't lock up Android. They don't believe Android will just run away for freedom.

I hope we all get the message here. Too much freedom will make stuff, from operating systems to our life, very different. If you are a parent, will you let your kid have whatever they want? Even if it's something bad? Will you let your kid go anywhere they want? Even to somewhere illegal? NO! We care about our children, like how Apple cares about their iOS so that the customers can have a much better experience.
post #18 of 269
So, games made for the original iphone vs the 3G vs. especially the 3GS and those vs. ipod touch corresponding gens which has faster variants of the same GPUs, and now the 4 and ipad isn't going to behave differently?

That's nice. There are people who think that having stuff like the Google voice app being approved, then yanked around the same time Jobs comes back to work, to Apple saying "We haven't rejected it, we are studying it, no really, we are" and take 18 months to bring it back, most likely only at the behest of the FTC, equally annoying features of a closed system, and this is stuff that never had to happen in the first place.
post #19 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cbswe View Post

John Carmack is somewhat inhuman when it comes to game programming. Almost all regular developers are "mere mortals"

Flashes of Johnny Carson were streaming through my mind's ether when the name Carnack was spoken.
post #20 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

Completely overblown statements made by people who obviously favor the iPhone.

There isn't even a paid version of the game for Android, and the only thing that affects performance is the stupid ads! Literally, in airplane mode, the game is as smooth as silk. Turn 3g on, get ads, and watch the game's framerates drop immensely. ...

Your being a bit disingenuous here yourself to say the least.

In the first place, your talking about the actual developers statements. The Angry Birds people took the time to port their game to Android and did as best as they could to make it work but the fragmentation got them. I don't know how you can spin that as "people who favour the iphone" or people who don't know what they are talking about.

Secondly, they published a list of at least a dozen Android phones that the game simply won't work on at all, and a simple visit to the comments thread or the store selling it will give you many reports of people who have 'approved' phones that the game doesn't run on either. All this after much development work on the part of the games creators. Do you really think they spent all that time on it, but somehow purposely screwed it up, just so they could cry foul? (they aren't even crying foul btw they are trying to fix it).

Lastly, you are arguing that there is no problem, but then advising people to play it with all network connectivity turned off so it will work right? Seriously? And you don't see the problem with that statement or how it basically proves the opposite of what you are arguing?

If we are going to be totally honest here, Angry Birds needs a good amount of memory and a good processor to run "smoothly" and it doesn't even run "smoothly" on an iPhone 4 if you have less than a gig or two of storage left. It's the only game I've ever played on the iPhone that I've had to crash out of or reboot the phone to get it to run again. Given that almost all Android phones on the market right now have much lesser processing power and much less storage than iPhone 4, it's pretty much a given that they are going to see some choppy-ness and glitches.

Making out like it "runs smooth as silk" (for you) just makes you look foolish. It's not believable.
post #21 of 269
Google should apologize.
post #22 of 269
Quote:
Prior to returning to Apple in 1996, Jobs said :



source
post #23 of 269
So the choice comes down to, SmartPhone vs portaPC. I'll take the SmartPhone made by Apple please. As I don't want to worry about viruses, hardware/software fragmentation, and unreliability.
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post #24 of 269
I'm sold. Just waiting for hell to freeze over and get mine on Verizon with 4G LTE. July?
post #25 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by davesw View Post

ANDROID = What's the point in being OPEN when your phone is JUNK?

Quote:
the definition of open: mkdir android ; cd android ; repo init -u git://android.git.kernel.org/platform/manifest.git ; repo sync ; make Andy Rubin


Android is so open that people are rooting their android devices....
post #26 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATM View Post



source

Yeah, Mac OS is done already, what you call Mac OS nowadays really is NeXTSTEP (Apple edition).
post #27 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Your being a bit disingenuous here yourself to say the least.
Lastly, you are arguing that there is no problem, but then advising people to play it with all network connectivity turned off so it will work right? Seriously? And you don't see the problem with that statement or how it basically proves the opposite of what you are arguing?

This is a nonissue. Just don't play it that way.
post #28 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by kimys1022 View Post

Well, first off, I'm not sure if you're saying Apple is bad or not, but I think you are because your title says Android Open, Android ONE. I apologize if I misunderstood you (I'm not the best reader)

If you are being negative about Apple's decision to be "closed" and don't allow freedom, well, think about this. The article proves that too much openness is bad, but also, it's actually good that Apple is closed and not so much open. Here's an example story.

Apple cares about their iOS so that the customers can have a much better experience.

...you obviously missed my "irony-off" mark at the bottom of my post.

More to the point we are talking about business decisions, decisions about how best to support an ecosystem, what the key business drivers are for each corporate entity and so on. The answers are fairly easy to understand - Apple provides "complete solutions" hardware+software,as their core business model, instead of the Microsoft model (for example) which is licensing software to hardware makers. Google is an ad-revenue model - everything Google does supports the core business of ad revenue. Google saw Android as the means to establish itself in the mobile device market in order to drive their core business. Every piece of free software, every deal with the handset makers is tied to their core business. Android may have even been a necessary stopgap measure as ChromeOS wasn't quite ready for primetime.
post #29 of 269
While there is a lot of truth in Daniel's article, I guess he misses the main point here. Google has almost zero interest in high quality apps, they want users to use search (where they are king) and watch ads. After all, these were the only reasons to create the platform.

Indicators / Proof:

- Still no way to charge for apps in most countries
- Not even a hint at a date for a tablet ready SDK, no standard for additional GUI elements
- Development of Chrome OS (an app-free environment) continuing despite zero demand

Google only supports apps for the sake of being competitive, they do not want them to be great. As soon as the next generation of Android devices, sporting dual core CPUs and more memory, will be widely available (around mid/end 2011), you will see support of the SDK drop even further. Once Flash is a viable alternative for the crappy apps they have now, the browser will be the main focus, and users will be in the environment that Google rules (the web); AdMob ads in mobile apps only capture a much smaller fraction of the market, as there is ample competition. In the end we will have quality apps on iOS, web apps plus Flash/AIR on Android and RIM, pseudo apps on WebOS and Silverlight apps on WP7. Knowing how well web apps resonated with iPhone users and developers... this is good news for Apple.
post #30 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

I guarantee you that 95% (or more) of users will NOT find replacing the GUI trivial.
Again, devices built on the Android frameworks (let's stop calling it an OS please) appeal to chronic fiddlers and their unfortunate relatives who they talk into buying them.

You're right! They're so hard to figure out

BTW, "replacing the GUI" is a stretch. The differences Jobs talk about can be changed by opening up market place, searching for "Launcher" and installing one of your choosing, then hitting the home button once it's isntalled and selecting the new launcher as the default launcher. Couldn't be easier.

It REALLY isn't hard! The reason companies are trying to be different is because they are trying to have the best launcher. Imagine that! Competition DRIVING innovation and progress. WEIRD
post #31 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by ihxo View Post

Android is so open that people are rooting their android devices....

Talking about public API vs private. Android isn't entirely open since there's private API that can't be accessed from the SDK, but you can access a buttload, which is why it's considered "open."

Rooting your phone gives you access to the system's innards if you will. It's a way to do things like change themes and uninstall bloatware installed into system sub folders.

See why some people would find your comment so stupid it's funny?
post #32 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

Completely overblown statements made by people who obviously favor the iPhone.

There isn't even a paid version of the game for Android, and the only thing that affects performance is the stupid ads!

Ever wondered why there is no paid version on Android....

[crickets] [crickets]

Might be because nearly everything on the Marketplace is pirated anyways, and Android users don't actually buy apps?
post #33 of 269
That explains why this game is on GetJar.


Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

While there is a lot of truth in Daniel's article, I guess he misses the main point here. Google has almost zero interest in high quality apps, they want users to use search (where they are king) and watch ads. After all, these were the only reasons to create the platform.

Indicators / Proof:

- Still no way to charge for apps in most countries
- Not even a hint at a date for a tablet ready SDK, no standard for additional GUI elements
- Development of Chrome OS (an app-free environment) continuing despite zero demand

Google only supports apps for the sake of being competitive, they do not want them to be great. As soon as the next generation of Android devices, sporting dual core CPUs and more memory, will be widely available (around mid/end 2011), you will see support of the SDK drop even further. Once Flash is a viable alternative for the crappy apps they have now, the browser will be the main focus, and users will be in the environment that Google rules (the web); AdMob ads in mobile apps only capture a much smaller fraction of the market, as there is ample competition. In the end we will have quality apps on iOS, web apps plus Flash/AIR on Android and RIM, pseudo apps on WebOS and Silverlight apps on WP7. Knowing how well web apps resonated with iPhone users and developers... this is good news for Apple.
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post #34 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Well, the ads have become a defining aspect of the platform, since it's the only way for developers to make money, so, even if it is the ads, it's still entirely relevant. And, Rovio did say fragmentation caused them problems, as did many commenters on their blog. The sooner people come out of denial about the problems inherent in Android, the happier they will be.

LOLWAT?

If there was a paid version im sure it would sell immensely, but Rovio seems to have been extremely smart and gone the Ad route, which loads an ad on every new stage as you proceed and i believe every other retry. I dont care for Angry Birds because i dont find it to be that great a game but if your average person plays 10-20 minutes a day with a few retries, and there are im sure well over 2+ million players on Android they can easily make much more money than they ever did on iOS.

Also this isnt a fragmentation issue, its a performance one. People reporting issues are those running low tier phones and those listed by Rovio are:

Droid Eris
HTC Dream
HTC Hero/T-Mobile G2 Touch
HTC Magic/Sapphire/Mytouch 3G
HTC Tattoo
HTC Wildfire
Huawei Ideos/U8150
LG Ally/Aloha/VS740
LG GW620/Eve
Motorola Backflip/MB300
Motorola Cliq/Dext
Samsung Acclaim
Samsung Moment/M900
Samsung Spica/i5700
Samsung Transform
Sony Ericsson Xperia X10 mini
T-Mobile G1

If anyone hasnt noticed, these are all old budget phones that have incredibly weak hardware (all of these listed are ARM11 phones with poor GPUs) and as such the games dont run exactly spectacular on them.
Now im sure some astute people will notice that these phones are roughly on par spec wise with the iPhone 3G. Unfortunately Rovio decided for the Android version of Angry Birds to code in OpenGL ES 2.0 while the iOS version runs on OpenGL ES 1.1 (obviously to grab the entire iOS userbase since the 2G/3G don't support it) and thus isnt as intense on the hardware.

This is not the same fragmentation that Android haters love to throw around, it simply doesnt run good on slow hardware. Its like expecting a netbook to perform like a Mac Pro would, lets just be real here, its not gonna happen. This is a side effect of being able to chose what you want.
post #35 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

Talking about public API vs private. Android isn't entirely open since there's private API that can't be accessed from the SDK, but you can access a buttload, which is why it's considered "open."

Rooting your phone gives you access to the system's innards if you will. It's a way to do things like change themes and uninstall bloatware installed into system sub folders.

See why some people would find your comment so stupid it's funny?

when you need to root your device to gain access to "system's innards".. it's called LOCKED DOWN.
post #36 of 269
deleted post
post #37 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post

iOS also has some fragmentation, just not as bad as Android. 3 screen resolutions, 4 generations of processing power on the iPhone, a few on iPod Touches and of course 1 generation of iPads. Different memory sizes.

Again, not nearly as bad, but there is something.

You're wrong. For one the first 3 generations of the iPhone and iPod touch had the same screen resolution. Second, they've officially stopped supporting the 1st generation products. The iPhone 2G and the 1G iPod touch are unable to run iOS 4. Another point is the iPhone 2G and iPhone 3G had the same exact memory and processor and so did the iPod touch 1G and 2G (same processor and ram as the iPhone just a higher clock speed for processor). The iPhone 4, iPod touch 4, and iPad all have the same a4 processor clocked at 1GHZ (iPad and iPod touch 4 have the same amount of ram). The only difference is the iPhone 3GS and iPod touch 3G which both have the same ram and clock speed.They really don't support the 3G anymore hence the stripping of features but than again if an app works on iOS 2.0 it works on the newer versions and every current model of iDevice runs the same OS. There are a few apps that require the new devices because of their hardware such as iMovie, RAGE HD and others. Those apps are well documented and you can easily determine whether it works on your previous generation device, which is not the case with Android. iDevices have more of a problem of obsolescence than fragmentation
post #38 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifail View Post

LOLWAT?

If there was a paid version im sure it would sell immensely, but Rovio seems to have been extremely smart and gone the Ad route, which loads an ad on every new stage as you proceed and i believe every other retry. I dont care for Angry Birds because i dont find it to be that great a game but if your average person plays 10-20 minutes a day with a few retries, and there are im sure well over 2+ million players on Android they can easily make much more money than they ever did on iOS.

Also this isnt a fragmentation issue, its a performance one. People reporting issues are those running low tier phones and those listed by Rovio are:

Droid Eris
HTC Dream
HTC Hero/T-Mobile G2 Touch
HTC Magic/Sapphire/Mytouch 3G
HTC Tattoo
HTC Wildfire
Huawei Ideos/U8150
LG Ally/Aloha/VS740
LG GW620/Eve
Motorola Backflip/MB300
Motorola Cliq/Dext
Samsung Acclaim
Samsung Moment/M900
Samsung Spica/i5700
Samsung Transform
Sony Ericsson Xperia X10 mini
T-Mobile G1

If anyone hasnt noticed, these are all old budget phones that have incredibly weak hardware (all of these listed are ARM11 phones with poor GPUs) and as such the games dont run exactly spectacular on them.
Now im sure some astute people will notice that these phones are roughly on par spec wise with the iPhone 3G. Unfortunately Rovio decided for the Android version of Angry Birds to code in OpenGL ES 2.0 while the iOS version runs on OpenGL ES 1.1 (obviously to grab the entire iOS userbase since the 2G/3G don't support it) and thus isnt as intense on the hardware.

This is not the same fragmentation that Android haters love to throw around, it simply doesnt run good on slow hardware. Its like expecting a netbook to perform like a Mac Pro would, lets just be real here, its not gonna happen. This is a side effect of being able to chose what you want.

i think your just explained why there is such a fragmentation issue with all these low powered phones it hard to keep track of how your game will run, keep in mind that a lot of android users buy the cheap phones hence androids success
post #39 of 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by vexorg View Post

If I were an android fan, I would be pretty pissed about the fragmentation, and how some developers have no choice but to develop for the lowest common denominator

Google needs to reboot Android. And why can't Google do this:

1. Have the source open to keep the geeks happy.

2. Maintain ONE version of Android that the box-builders license from Google. If you want to use the Android name, you use Google's OS (just like MS's Windows model).

Then again what do I know. I've been calling for MS to throw out Windows and start completely over since Windows 95, and that hasn't happened either...
post #40 of 269
I've posted this on other boards and I will post it here....

Fragmentation is the biggest strategic problem that Android (Linux) will face --- a divided house will fall.

Those deep within the Linux community think that fragmentation is a feature. Those outside the Linux community, and looking at Linux as a possible solution, see fragmentation as a deal-breaker.


If I were Microsoft or Apple, I'd start a grass roots effort to extol the virtues of multiple versions and flavors of Android (Linux). The best way to defeat an enemy is to make it internally divisive.
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