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Amazon Kindle 'rapidly' losing e-reader market share to Apple's iPad

post #1 of 68
Thread Starter 
As Apple's iPad continues its strong sales pace, the touchscreen tablet has narrowed the gap with Amazon's Kindle in terms of e-reader hardware market share.

ChangeWave on Tuesday released the results of its survey of e-reader owners. Of the 2,800 consumers polled, 47 percent said they own an Amazon Kindle, a "rapidly diminishing lead" it continues to lose as Apple's iPad gains market share.

In terms of the e-reader market, the iPad went from a 16 percent share in August to 32 percent in November. In the same time, Amazon's share plummeted 62 percent to 47 percent.

The survey also found that iPad owners are more satisfied with their purchase than those with a Kindle. Of those who own an iPad, 75 percent said they are "very satisfied" with the device, compared to 54 percent for the Kindle.

Apple also holds an advantage in terms of potential buyers. ChangeWave also found that 42 percent of customers looking to buy an e-reader in the next 90 days would get Apple's iPad, while 33 percent would opt for the Amazon Kindle.



The market for e-readers is growing as well, as 5 percent of total respondents said they are "very likely" to buy an e-reader in the next 90 days, and other 10 percent said they are "somewhat likely" to buy one within three months.



In March, before the iPad was even released, ChangeWave found that consumer interest in the Kindle had waned since Apple announced its touchscreen tablet. That survey predicted that reading books, magazines and newspapers would be a major use for the iPad, something the latest survey reaffirms.
post #2 of 68
Does Apple own ChangeWave?
Reminds me of those old Microsoft bought surveys.
Meanwhile Kindle 2's sold out in a nano second on Black Friday.
post #3 of 68
Results sounds about right. Of course they are missing the point somewhat...Amazon doesnt lose out too badly when they dont sell a Kindle because someone bought an iPad. Where they really lose out if that same someone with an iPad uses iBooks instead of the iPad Kindle app.

I try to use iBooks, but Amazon has 10x the selection of books easily. Especially when you go outside them most popular texts. Unless iBooks signs a ton more publishing houses, Amazon and their Kindle platform will do just fine despite what the survey suggests.
post #4 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by markb View Post

I try to use iBooks, but Amazon has 10x the selection of books easily. Especially when you go outside them most popular texts. Unless iBooks signs a ton more publishing houses, Amazon and their Kindle platform will do just fine despite what the survey suggests.

Agreed. but more importantly besides the publishing houses Apple needs to sign on with more devices (never happen) i.e. you can't read an iBook on a Mac or a PC or a Blackberry or a Droid.
You can with a Kindle eBook.

Besides the iPad fails as an eReader- who wants to read staring into a light source?
post #5 of 68
2,800 consumers polled when each device has sold millions? The results can't even be as large as the margin of error would be if you polled all the device owners. Extrapolating such a small sample is meaningless.
post #6 of 68
Pointless survey. Those with a Kindle actually READ. Those with an iPad MAY read, but most likely do a lot of web browsing, emailing, etc.

And to compare the happiness of someone who spends $600 for an iPad with a lot of whiz-bang will OF COURSE rate their purchase higher than someone who buys a $139 black-and-white Kindle that is a dedicated reading machine.

I don't own either. I'm impressed by both. I do a lot of reading and really like the eInk of the Kindle. The iPad has more uses.
post #7 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by op12 View Post

2,800 consumers polled when each device has sold millions? The results can't even be as large as the margin of error would be if you polled all the device owners. Extrapolating such a small sample is meaningless.

The Kindle is DOOMED!
post #8 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by markb View Post

Results sounds about right. Of course they are missing the point somewhat...Amazon doesnt lose out too badly when they dont sell a Kindle because someone bought an iPad. Where they really lose out if that same someone with an iPad uses iBooks instead of the iPad Kindle app.

I try to use iBooks, but Amazon has 10x the selection of books easily. Especially when you go outside them most popular texts. Unless iBooks signs a ton more publishing houses, Amazon and their Kindle platform will do just fine despite what the survey suggests.

Exactly. Amazon was smart and saw the writing on the wall when the iPad was announced. They kicked off an app within record pace.
post #9 of 68
I think wifi only Kindle will be under $100 very soon.
post #10 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by op12 View Post

2,800 consumers polled when each device has sold millions? The results can't even be as large as the margin of error would be if you polled all the device owners. Extrapolating such a small sample is meaningless.

You are wrong. That's many times what's needed for an accurate sample.
post #11 of 68
Initially I planned on buying a Kindle, but I quickly forgot about that once the iPad was announced. Glad I did, too.

For me, multipurpose wins hands down.

Books
Newspapers
Magazines
Games
Web Browsing
Email
Movies
Music
AirPlay
Videos

- love it
post #12 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

Besides the iPad fails as an eReader- who wants to read staring into a light source?

Groan... not that retarded rhetoric again. There is nothing 'bad' about reading on a backlit and yes, glossy, screen. It won't screw up your eye sight. You may not like it but that's totally different.
post #13 of 68
I have no doubt that Apple will kick Kindles ass, but for now, in about 3 seconds from sending this I'm gonna unwrap my new kindle...
post #14 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Groan... not that retarded rhetoric again. There is nothing 'bad' about reading on a backlit and yes, glossy, screen. It won't screw up your eye sight. You may not like it but that's totally different.

To my ignore list, Apple fanboy. Keep reading into a light bulb.
post #15 of 68
I brought a Kindle when they dropped the price and I'll probably get an iPad when the 2nd generation is launched. I don't really see the two as competing products. The real competition is between the two stores. Unfortunately for Apple I'll be using Amazons store. They have better selection at this point and I can read my ebooks on more devices. The small size of the Kindle lets me take it with me wherever I travel and I can rest assured that it will last through a camping trip where no power is available. If I could read iBooks books on the Kindle or another eReader, I'd consider it, but I can't.

In other news, DRM usage in eBooks is extremely anticompetitive. Pirates will always pirate, DRM or not. DRM only hurts consumers.
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post #16 of 68
I can afford neither a Kindle nor an iPad, but buying a book to read on the subway or in the doctor's waiting room vs. all the media and interactive magazines, videos, games, news, email and personal information is a "no-brainer".

I am sure you can also find an app or two that will allow you to read Amazon books, OR get you bootleg Amazon books—afterall, a book is just a collection of text and you can easily copy that.

If you're anywhere "Creative", magazines and newspapers are going to be more interative—and they will keep on coming. Finding a Kindle instead of an iPad under the Christmas tree would like getting a "lump of coal". (Well, sort of. With this Economy, I'd settle for the cash!)
post #17 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

To my ignore list, Apple fanboy. Keep reading into a light bulb.

Ballmer's illegitimate child can go back to reading "Little Women" and "Moby Dick".
post #18 of 68
Where does the other poster claim it will ruin his or her eyes? The person merely asks who wants to read glaring into a light source. The issue is one of comfort.

If you are reading for a long period of time and for pure enjoyment it is far more comfortable reading on a Kindle. It is more analogous to reading from a book.

Reading on the iPad is fine, but is more similar to reading from a computer. After a while, your eyes feel strained.

Do a Google search on computer eye strain. I got 461, 000 hits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Groan... not that retarded rhetoric again. There is nothing 'bad' about reading on a backlit and yes, glossy, screen. It won't screw up your eye sight. You may not like it but that's totally different.
post #19 of 68
I have both and use both for different purposes. I would never settle into bed to read a book with the iPad. It simply strains my eyes after awhile. It is more comfortable reading on the Kindle for long periods.



Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Groan... not that retarded rhetoric again. There is nothing 'bad' about reading on a backlit and yes, glossy, screen. It won't screw up your eye sight. You may not like it but that's totally different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bmovie View Post

I can afford neither a Kindle nor an iPad, but buying a book to read on the subway or in the doctor's waiting room vs. all the media and interactive magazines, videos, games, news, email and personal information is a "no-brainer".

I am sure you can also find an app or two that will allow you to read Amazon books, OR get you bootleg Amazon booksafterall, a book is just a collection of text and you can easily copy that.

If you're anywhere "Creative", magazines and newspapers are going to be more interativeand they will keep on coming. Finding a Kindle instead of an iPad under the Christmas tree would like getting a "lump of coal". (Well, sort of. With this Economy, I'd settle for the cash!)
post #20 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

Where does the other poster claim it will ruin his or her eyes? The person merely asks who wants to read glaring into a light source. The issue is one of comfort.

If you are reading for a long period of time and for pure enjoyment it is far more comfortable reading on a Kindle. It is more analogous to reading from a book.

Reading on the iPad is fine, but is more similar to reading from a computer. After a while, your eyes feel strained.

Do a Google search on computer eye strain. I got 461, 000 hits.

I love the "do a search number of hits equals truth" argument. I did a "Kindle sucks" search and got 397,000 hits. Therefore, the Kindle sucks.

Except it doesn't, of course, and LCD reading comfort is a matter of preference. I guess I'm obliged to point out, as must be pointed out every time this topic comes up, that hundreds of millions of people spend the entire day reading text on LCD monitor screens and they don't seem to be clamoring for e-ink.

The Nook Color seems to be faring pretty well, and there's lots of talk that Amazon is preparing a color model (which inevitably means LCD or AMOLED) to remain competitive.

I guess I could play the Apple basher's favorite card here, and roll my eyes about how the Kindle "fan boys" will not doubt declare a color LCD screen awesome once Amazon adopts it, but I'm better than that.
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post #21 of 68
I now own a kindle and an iPad. Like someone posted earlier, they don't really compete...yet. But when e-ink technology matures I guarantee apple will release a competing product, but done properly. I have only owned it for 10 minutes and I'm thinking 'if this was an Apple product it would work like...' much room for improvement, but til then I have the best of both worlds.
post #22 of 68
Light is light, whether it is the source or reflected.

The problem is simply that iPad is too bright. iPhone is much better for reading at night if you reduce the brightness to minimum (assuming the book app is using a bright white color for background). However, the iPad brightness doesn't go down that much.
post #23 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

I love the "do a search number of hits equals truth" argument. I did a "Kindle sucks" search and got 397,000 hits. Therefore, the Kindle sucks.

Except it doesn't, of course, and LCD reading comfort is a matter of preference. I guess I'm obliged to point out, as must be pointed out every time this topic comes up, that hundreds of millions of people spend the entire day reading text on LCD monitor screens and they don't seem to be clamoring for e-ink.

The Nook Color seems to be faring pretty well, and there's lots of talk that Amazon is preparing a color model (which inevitably means LCD or AMOLED) to remain competitive.

I guess I could play the Apple basher's favorite card here, and roll my eyes about how the Kindle "fan boys" will not doubt declare a color LCD screen awesome once Amazon adopts it, but I'm better than that.

Love the post, addabox.

To avoid eye strains, I lie in bed reading my iPad with sunglasses on. Pictures after the break...
post #24 of 68
I totally agree about Amazon having the best selection of books. iBooks is still too limited but is growing. Plus I have not found a way to archive books from iBooks so that the space can be recovered on the iPAD. If anyone knows how - please let me know.
post #25 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Postulant View Post

Love the post, addabox.

To avoid eye strains, I lie in bed reading my iPad with sunglasses on. Pictures after the break...

lol
post #26 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

Pointless survey. Those with a Kindle actually READ. Those with an iPad MAY read, but most likely do a lot of web browsing, emailing, etc.

The survey was among e-book readers, so it wasn't as if they just asked random device owners.

Quote:
And to compare the happiness of someone who spends $600 for an iPad with a lot of whiz-bang will OF COURSE rate their purchase higher than someone who buys a $139 black-and-white Kindle that is a dedicated reading machine.

I don't get that. Why wouldn't a Kindle owner be just as satisfied with his or her purchase, since they bought it specifically for reading books? Being "readers" and all? It's not like they expected to get an iPad are are disappointed or surprised. If I buy something for a particular purpose, my satisfaction will hinge on how well it performs that purpose, not on the existence of other devices that may have other purposes.

There are only two reasons I can think of-- either the Kindle doesn't satisfy as an e-reader (for a certain percentage of owners) or that same percentage come to feel whatever advantages a dedicated e-reader offer are exceeded by the advantages of a multi-purpose machine and develop buyer's remorse.

In which case the "of course the iPad has higher satisfaction numbers" idea makes sense, but not in the way you meant. It means that dedicated e-readers may be doomed to obsolescence, just like so many other stand alone devices are being squeezed by the new mobile devices that can morph into most anything.

Quote:
I don't own either. I'm impressed by both. I do a lot of reading and really like the eInk of the Kindle. The iPad has more uses.

I agree, sort of. I've used a borrowed Kindle for a while, and I found the screen to feel cramped and the contrast range to be a little subpar. Other than that, I could see using an e-ink device for reading.

I noticed that I've gotten very used to having a sense of where I am in a book by the heft of the remaining pages, and that I like having a facing page in my field of view. Just habit, I guess, but it made the Kindle feel like reading a book through a small aperture. Claustrophobic. I imagine the iPad's larger screen helps ameliorate that feeling-- screen illumination preferences notwithstanding.
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post #27 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Except it doesn't, of course, and LCD reading comfort is a matter of preference. I guess I'm obliged to point out, as must be pointed out every time this topic comes up, that hundreds of millions of people spend the entire day reading text on LCD monitor screens and they don't seem to be clamoring for e-ink.

Could it be that there's no real option for laptop use? No use yelling, because no improvement is available from any vendor. Eye strain complaints from computers is someting I hear a lot of people complaining about. Eye strain with backlit sources is real, though the level of discomfort varies by individual. If I can use Kindle to reduce my eye-strain, I use it. I've got both and I don't even feel very comfortable reading comics with the marvel app, but do feel comfortable reading a book on the kindle.

Personally a colour e-ink with the speed and color fidelity of current LCDs would be the ideal choice. When a laptop or tablet like that becomes available, it's countdown for LCDs in computer use. The opposite of your position would be "When apple comes out with E-ink based tablets with good colour reproduction and response, suddenly eye-strain will become an issue that Apple magically solved and that LCDs are absolutely horrible". Or something different?

Regs, Jarkko
post #28 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by markb View Post

Results sounds about right. Of course they are missing the point somewhat...Amazon doesnt lose out too badly when they dont sell a Kindle because someone bought an iPad. Where they really lose out if that same someone with an iPad uses iBooks instead of the iPad Kindle app.

I try to use iBooks, but Amazon has 10x the selection of books easily. Especially when you go outside them most popular texts. Unless iBooks signs a ton more publishing houses, Amazon and their Kindle platform will do just fine despite what the survey suggests.

I've recently just purchased my first book for the Kindle app, The only reason was because I split my reading between the iPad and the HTC EVO, so I enjoy the kindles page sync feature. I wish apple would make ibooks open to non ios devices, if they did I think they would steal a lot more kindle users. I should email Steve Jobs.
post #29 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superep View Post

I totally agree about Amazon having the best selection of books. iBooks is still too limited but is growing. Plus I have not found a way to archive books from iBooks so that the space can be recovered on the iPAD. If anyone knows how - please let me know.

when you sync the ipad go to the Sync Books tab and uncheck the books you nolonger want on the ipad, then click sync. The books will be removed from the ipad but will remain in itunes for you to re add to the ipad in the future if you want.
post #30 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by jahonen View Post

Could it be that there's no real option for laptop use? No use yelling, because no improvement is available from any vendor. Eye strain complaints from computers is someting I hear a lot of people complaining about. Eye strain with backlit sources is real, though the level of discomfort varies by individual. If I can use Kindle to reduce my eye-strain, I use it. I've got both and I don't even feel very comfortable reading comics with the marvel app, but do feel comfortable reading a book on the kindle.

That's a valid point; however, most people don't seem to have too much trouble with computer eye strain. I agree e-ink as used by the Kindle is easier on the eyes, it's just that there are other issues that (for me) outweigh that advantage.

Quote:
Personally a colour e-ink with the speed and color fidelity of current LCDs would be the ideal choice. When a laptop or tablet like that becomes available, it's countdown for LCDs in computer use.

Well, sure, if a much better technology with clear advantages and no drawbacks emerges then of course we'll all be pleased. However, that's not really what we're talking about, which is the relative advantages/disadvantages of e-ink, as currently deployed, vs. LCD (or AMOLED).

Quote:
The opposite of your position would be "When apple comes out with E-ink based tablets with good colour reproduction and response, suddenly eye-strain will become an issue that Apple magically solved and that LCDs are absolutely horrible". Or something different?

Regs, Jarkko

It's a given that more than a few people will chastise Apple "fan boys" for having been insufficiently enthusiastic about nonexistent tech if and when that tech emerges on the market, complete with made-up stories about how they waxed rhapsodic about the excellence of LCDs for reading and swore they'd never, ever consider any other screen. Which is why I made a little joke about it. Ha ha, I guess.
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post #31 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnqh View Post

Light is light, whether it is the source or reflected.

The problem is simply that iPad is too bright. iPhone is much better for reading at night if you reduce the brightness to minimum (assuming the book app is using a bright white color for background). However, the iPad brightness doesn't go down that much.

It goes down almost to LED-off when in iBooks, actually lower than the point of reasonable legibility in a completely dark room. Sure with the backlight set all the way down you can still read big B&W text, but to make it comfortable for normal text and diagrams/pics it actually needs to go up more than a little. And you don't need a cutsie night-lite like you would for a Kindle.
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post #32 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Groan... not that retarded rhetoric again. There is nothing 'bad' about reading on a backlit and yes, glossy, screen. It won't screw up your eye sight. You may not like it but that's totally different.

I would have agreed with you before I got an iPad. After all, I used to read for hours on end on Palm devices and my iPod touch and iPhone, and I work all day staring at LCD screens, and neither glossy screens nor backlighting ever bothered me. Pre-purchase I figured that my problem with reading on the iPad would come down to battery life. That is a pretty big issue, especially when traveling, but not even close to the worst.

I *hate* extended reading on the iPad. It causes eyestrain. My gut call is that it's because of the font smoothing. All of the fonts I've tried, in both iBooks and the Kindle app, appear blurry. The pixel density of the iPad screen is just too low for font smoothing, I think, and *none* of the available fonts avoid it. On the handheld devices the fonts appear sharp, and on my PCs they are sharp. But not with the iPad's e-book readers!

Interestingly, I do not have this issue when reading web pages, nor with the Wired iPad app (I really think magazines on the iPad are a winner), nor with the new NY Times app. None of these use the fonts used in the e-book readers, and all appear much sharper to my eyes. On the other hand, it's rare that I read for very long before bouncing around in any of those (even long Wired articles are usually finished in 5 to 10 minutes); maybe the changing page layouts makes a difference.

I think the glossy screen makes a big difference, too, even though it never bothered me on my Macbook. The angle at which I use the iPad is much more horizontal than any laptop I've ever owned. That makes it far, far more likely to reflect ceiling lights into my eyes. It's really irritating, enough that I have considered getting one of those laminates to reduce the glare. (Haven't done it yet because I really don't like sticking things to my screens.)

On top of that eyestrain issues, the iPad really is too heavy as a reader. I literally got tennis elbow within a week of receiving my iPad. I'd never had that before, and I have had to be very careful when holding the iPad for extended periods. It really needs to be propped up. That's no big deal when I'm watching movies with it on a table or pillow but it's kind of a pain when I'm reading in a chair.

I still love the iPad, and I am totally shocked at how little I use my laptop now, but given my choice I will do extended reading with the Kindle every time. It's much more comfortable to hold, screen glare is much less of a problem, it works in bright light, its fonts are SHARP, and I don't have to worry about the battery dying if I can't recharge it in the evening.

YMMV, but my opinion stems from having and using both for hours every day. If you love to read, and you're reading novels rather than graphic layouts like magazines, then the Kindle is by far the better choice in my opinion. Even if the screens were equal, the lower weight is by itself a huge improvement. The Kindle is, of course, lousy for non-textual content ... so it's nice to have both if you can do it.

If I don't have my Kindle I'd still rather read books on the iPhone than on the iPad. You cannot even imagine how much that surprises me.

jim frost
jimf@frostbytes.com
post #33 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by jahonen View Post

Could it be that there's no real option for laptop use? No use yelling, because no improvement is available from any vendor. Eye strain complaints from computers is someting I hear a lot of people complaining about. Eye strain with backlit sources is real, though the level of discomfort varies by individual. If I can use Kindle to reduce my eye-strain, I use it. I've got both and I don't even feel very comfortable reading comics with the marvel app, but do feel comfortable reading a book on the kindle.

Almost all computer eye strain is from CRT flicker, interactions with CRT and overhead fluorescent lights, or just plain bad workstation lighting that no monitor could help. A backlight LCD itself when set to an appropriate level for the ambient lighting does not cause eyestrain.


Quote:
Personally a colour e-ink with the speed and color fidelity of current LCDs would be the ideal choice. When a laptop or tablet like that becomes available, it's countdown for LCDs in computer use. The opposite of your position would be "When apple comes out with E-ink based tablets with good colour reproduction and response, suddenly eye-strain will become an issue that Apple magically solved and that LCDs are absolutely horrible". Or something different?

Regs, Jarkko

Color gamut limitations given non-Sun light source color temperatures and luminosities make that an impossible task for a reflective screen system. To get color light MUST be filtered above the reflective surface, and that drastically cuts reflected luminance and the possible color gamut. Basic physics of simulating a system is the problem here. Unless of course you find a way to nano-build atomic components at runtime from actual materials and properly orient them to the eye and the light source so that a reflected and non-filtered presentation can be made. Is it possible? Maybe, but not in our civilizations lifetime.
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post #34 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellacool View Post

Exactly. Amazon was smart and saw the writing on the wall when the iPad was announced. They kicked off an app within record pace.

Err, the Kindle app was available long before the iPad was even announced. Like, years. I have always loved it for its ability to synchronize between multiple devices; I regularly pull down a book I'm reading on the Kindle onto my iPhone when I'm somewhere without my Kindle, and I missed that immediately with iBooks. (I know there's some kind of sync feature now, but I haven't yet tried it. Mostly I prefer to use the Kindle app because the books are far more portable, and almost always cheaper too.)

jim frost
jimf@frostbytes.com
post #35 of 68
25% who own an iPad are not satisfied with the device! Sheez...what would it take to satisfy them?

Sheez!

Best
post #36 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiro View Post

Color gamut limitations given non-Sun light source color temperatures and luminosities make that an impossible task for a reflective screen system. To get color light MUST be filtered above the reflective surface, and that drastically cuts reflected luminance and the possible color gamut. Basic physics of simulating a system is the problem here. Unless of course you find a way to nano-build atomic components at runtime from actual materials and properly orient them to the eye and the light source so that a reflected and non-filtered presentation can be made. Is it possible? Maybe, but not in our civilizations lifetime.

I don't really see why it should be impossible to use different tints for the e-ink particles, without needing filters. They're not using filters now, right? Their problems seem to be two-fold:

1. It is difficult to construct small enough pixels to be able to pack them in tight enough for blending when each pixel has to be a particular shade. It's likely this will get solved as the technology matures.

2. It is difficult to get high levels of contrast, so the colors appear muddy. This may actually be improved faster than #1; it's really amazing how much better the contrast is on a K3 than the K1 or K2.

I'm not sure they couldn't do pretty well even with muddy colors, though. Much graphic content doesn't need to be vivid to convey the information. Still, I think it'll be a long time before I prefer a Kindle to an iPad for color content.

jim frost
jimf@frostbytes.com
post #37 of 68
While Kindle is an okay device, it really is transitional. With the rise of iOS devices it was doomed from the start.

Amazon was smart to release Kindle apps for as many different platforms as they have.

Selling content is where the real money is. Just ask Apple.
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post #38 of 68
Marketing nonsense aside, the Kindle offers an unmatched value: free 3G connection for life! Compare this to a $1000/year data plan...

- sent from my wife's Kindle
post #39 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

... Compare this to a $1000/year data plan...

...

Three questions:
  1. Who is offering a $1000 data plan?
  2. For which device?
  3. On which planet?
post #40 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

To my ignore list, Apple fanboy. Keep reading into a light bulb.

LOL I wonder who's the one going into people's ignore lists.
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