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iOS 4.2 supports technology for reducing network congestion

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Nokia Siemens Networks revealed Tuesday that the company had conducted tests confirming that the iOS 4.2 update for iPhone supports its Network Controlled Fast Dormancy technology, which minimizes network congestion and improves battery life.

Network Controlled Fast Dormancy (NCFD), which was developed by Nokia Siemens Networks, reduces network congestion by keeping smartphones in an "intermediate state" instead of alternating between idle and always active on the network.

From this intermediate state, smartphones can "wake up" more quickly while conserving battery life when not in use. NCFD also reduces the number of signals needed to start a data connection between a smartphone and a network.

The post did not explain what kinds of tests Nokia Siemens Networks ran to confirm the iPhone's support of the technology, but did state that the iPhone will take advantage of NCFD on networks that support it. Nokia implemented NCFD into its own smartphones earlier this year, the post noted.

According to one Middle Eastern operator, smartphones on a Nokia Siemens Networks network had 11 hours of battery life compared to 6 hours on a competing network. Testing in North America found that Nokia Siemens Networks' "smart networks" generate "up to 50 percent less smartphone signaling."

It is unclear to what extent NCFD has been implemented on the AT&T network, but the new technology could serve to lighten the load for the sole carrier of the iPhone in the U.S., which has been criticized for poor coverage in major cities such as New York and San Francisco.

Earlier this year, The Wall Street Journal reported that AT&T executives had flown to Apple's Cupertino, Calif., campus to give iPhone designers a "crash course in wireless networking." As a result, Apple "rejiggered" how its smartphones communicate with AT&T towers, reducing the strain on the AT&T network.
post #2 of 28
Since the update, I will start using the phone at 9:00, say, and if it's basically idle, or just reading mail and making a call or two, the battery will still be at 70% at 2:00 in the morning. That's a real improvement from what I was getting.

Of course, if I watch a feature film on it, and then play Rage HD, I'll need a charge by 5:00 in the afternoon.
post #3 of 28
This is one of those things that are hard to bullet point, but is great for consumers. Way to go!
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post #4 of 28
I hope someone benchmarks the differences.
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post #5 of 28
  • improved wireless efficiency
post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

From this intermediate state, smartphones can "wake up" more quickly while conserving battery life when not in use. NCFD also reduces the number of signals needed to start a data
It is unclear to what extent NCFD has been implemented on the AT&T network, but the new technology could serve to lighten the load for the sole carrier of the iPhone in the U.S., which has been criticized for poor coverage in major cities such as New York and San Francisco.

Earlier this year, The Wall Street Journal reported that AT&T executives had flown to Apple's Cupertino, Calif., campus to give iPhone designers a "crash course in wireless networking." As a result, Apple "rejiggered" how its smartphones communicate with AT&T towers, reducing the strain on the AT&T network.

Great technology now hopefully the carriers are capable of implementing it on their towers..
post #7 of 28
AT&T must be like "Where was this 3 years ago!"
post #8 of 28
Am presently roaming with data turned off, push email (and Skype!) via WiFi, 3G voice and SMS normal.

Have got 48% battery remaining after 3 days on my IP4 under 4.2.1. This feels like about double the performance of my 3GS under 4.1.

Nice one, Apple.
post #9 of 28
Yeah honestly I'm seeing double the battery life with iPhone 4, whether or not this schmancy thing applies to my current telco. Too bad no one here does authorised iPhone battery replacements unlike the US. That, sucks.
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgl323 View Post

AT&T must be like "Where was this 3 years ago!"

They'll have to wait a little while since they don't use NSN's RNCs. They'll have to wait until Ericsson brings the same feature out as well. NSN is the first to bring it out, but it is an open 3GPP standard so Huawei and Ericsson are likely to introduce the feature as well since it doesn't take a whole lot of development on the network side.

Another interesting thinkg would be to know if iOS 4.2 supports CPC and CS over HSPA. If it does these, it would improve talk time by another 50% for voice calls with the right networks.

Regs, Jarkko
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stefano Lavori View Post

This is one of those things that are hard to bullet point, but is great for consumers. Way to go!

Big win for everyone - the consumer, AT&T, Nokia and Apple. No 'zero-sum-game' here!
post #12 of 28
Something does not add up for me - if Nokia had to run undisclosed tests to verify that the iPhone is using their technology - does that not imply that they did not know whether the technology had been licensed by Apple in the first place? or is that not patented or require license fees or royalties of some sort?
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by markietalkie View Post

  • improved wireless efficiency

  • increased battery life
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by OllieWallieWhiskers View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by markietalkie

  • improved wireless efficiency

  • increased battery life

  • Increased bullet points
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post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

Something does not add up for me - if Nokia had to run undisclosed tests to verify that the iPhone is using their technology - does that not imply that they did not know whether the technology had been licensed by Apple in the first place? or is that not patented or require license fees or royalties of some sort?

Why would there be a lawsuit about added software that works with systems that Nokia Siemens Network services provide?
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

Something does not add up for me - if Nokia had to run undisclosed tests to verify that the iPhone is using their technology - does that not imply that they did not know whether the technology had been licensed by Apple in the first place? or is that not patented or require license fees or royalties of some sort?

Just because something has been licensed, doesn't necessarily mean it's been implemented yet.
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

Something does not add up for me - if Nokia had to run undisclosed tests to verify that the iPhone is using their technology - does that not imply that they did not know whether the technology had been licensed by Apple in the first place? or is that not patented or require license fees or royalties of some sort?

It's more likely they just verified that the technology was properly implemented to spec and that it works as expected.
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post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by tawilson View Post

Just because something has been licensed, doesn't necessarily mean it's been implemented yet.

That did occur to me - that it might be checking to see if it had been implemented or that it had been done correctly.
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Why would there be a lawsuit about added software that works with systems that Nokia Siemens Network services provide?

Why indeed - I was just speculating that there might be some tenuous reason - and aren't Apple and Nokia already involved in one lawsuit or another with each other?
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

Something does not add up for me - if Nokia had to run undisclosed tests to verify that the iPhone is using their technology - does that not imply that they did not know whether the technology had been licensed by Apple in the first place? or is that not patented or require license fees or royalties of some sort?

This is just a tweak to the signalling and clarification of some of the specifications wording. No patents needed.

Regs, Jarkko
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by OllieWallieWhiskers

  • improved wireless efficiency
Quote:
Originally Posted by markietalkie

  • increased battery life
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

  • Increased bullet points

  • More AI thread posts

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post #22 of 28
What I'd like to know is whether this technology is implemented in regular firmware (i.e. iOS 4.2) or the baseband firmware. Does anyone know? I ask because those of us with unlocked phones generally avoid updating the baseband firmware because Apple closes holes used for unlocking ;-)
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by telemaque View Post

What I'd like to know is whether this technology is implemented in regular firmware (i.e. iOS 4.2) or the baseband firmware. Does anyone know? I ask because those of us with unlocked phones generally avoid updating the baseband firmware because Apple closes holes used for unlocking ;-)

Something like this would have to be baseband. The application processor has no effect on the radio signaling other than to ask the baseband to place or terminate a call, and even that is generally mediated by the SIM processor.
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by olliewalliewhiskers View Post

  • increased battery life

Quote:
Originally Posted by markietalkie View Post

  • improved wireless efficiency

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

  • increased bullet points

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post

  • more ai thread posts


  • 33% deeper nesting
post #25 of 28
Who didn't see this coming!

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Nokia Siemens Networks revealed Tuesday that the company had conducted tests confirming that the iOS 4.2 update for iPhone supports its Network Controlled Fast Dormancy technology, which minimizes network congestion and improves battery life.

Network Controlled Fast Dormancy (NCFD), which was developed by Nokia Siemens Networks, reduces network congestion by keeping smartphones in an "intermediate state" instead of alternating between idle and always active on the network.

From this intermediate state, smartphones can "wake up" more quickly while conserving battery life when not in use. NCFD also reduces the number of signals needed to start a data connection between a smartphone and a network.

The post did not explain what kinds of tests Nokia Siemens Networks ran to confirm the iPhone's support of the technology, but did state that the iPhone will take advantage of NCFD on networks that support it. Nokia implemented NCFD into its own smartphones earlier this year, the post noted.

According to one Middle Eastern operator, smartphones on a Nokia Siemens Networks network had 11 hours of battery life compared to 6 hours on a competing network. Testing in North America found that Nokia Siemens Networks' "smart networks" generate "up to 50 percent less smartphone signaling."

It is unclear to what extent NCFD has been implemented on the AT&T network, but the new technology could serve to lighten the load for the sole carrier of the iPhone in the U.S., which has been criticized for poor coverage in major cities such as New York and San Francisco.

Earlier this year, The Wall Street Journal reported that AT&T executives had flown to Apple's Cupertino, Calif., campus to give iPhone designers a "crash course in wireless networking." As a result, Apple "rejiggered" how its smartphones communicate with AT&T towers, reducing the strain on the AT&T network.
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

Something does not add up for me - if Nokia had to run undisclosed tests to verify that the iPhone is using their technology - does that not imply that they did not know whether the technology had been licensed by Apple in the first place? or is that not patented or require license fees or royalties of some sort?

It isn't Nokia, it is NSN, Nokia is a part owner.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

Why indeed - I was just speculating that there might be some tenuous reason - and aren't Apple and Nokia already involved in one lawsuit or another with each other?

LIke I said to the other person, this article isn't talking about Nokia, it is talking about NSN
post #28 of 28
Better and better by small steps...
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