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Apple won't allow demos, trials, betas on Mac App Store - Page 2

post #41 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Honestly I cant see my mom going to one of those sites to download an app.
...
PS: Removing the info to who you are replying disrupts the flow of a thread, especially when you are only quoting a small segment of their original reply.

There are users like your mom and the MAS will be beneficial to them. I don't think that currently these users make the largest part of all Mac OS X users. This may change after a few years of existence of the MAS, but right now I think that most Mac OS X users can install apps.

Why you guys keep talking about dmg and stuff? You download an app, and Mac OS X automatically mounts the dmg file and launches the installation script. No need to know what a dmg file is.

Regarding quoting other posts - I did not remove the reference, I just quoted the post differently.
post #42 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by BenRoethig View Post

Hopefully never. That being said, they like having the power to make choices for you, so I would say a small chance of this happening with Lion and with a much larger chance of it happening in 10.8.

I think this article points to Apple having no plans to disallow non-MAS app installations. If they did, wouldnt they be allowing for the demos and trials (at least) without reminding devs that they should use their website to promote these types of apps?
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post #43 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueDjinn View Post

WE* think that VersionTracker (well, before C|Net took 'em over), MacUpdate and so forth are common knowledge. However, *WE* only represent perhaps 10% of the consumer market (ok, perhaps 20%)--the other 80% has little or no clue about any of these sites, or how to use them, or which ones are reputable, etc etc.

QFT

PS: I originally had grandmother in my post, too.
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post #44 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by serkol View Post

...I don't think that currently these users make the largest part of all Mac OS X users...right now I think that most Mac OS X users can install apps.

Actually, sadly, no--or, at least, most computer users have little or no clue how to do so. There's a LOT more "moms" out there than us.

Example: Awhile back, I was doing some temp work at a standard "Dilbert-style" cubicle farm office, filling in for a woman for a couple of weeks. I'm left-handed, so the first thing I did was to switch the mouse buttons on the Windows machine.

My co-workers freaked out. They chastized me for "hacking the computer" and immediately called the IT dept to "fix" the problem. They finally "compromised" by letting me switch the buttons, but only until the end of the day--I had to switch it back before I left, even though I was the one who would be working at the same cubicle the next morning.

I've seen 24" CRTs set to 800x600 resolution--the icons are life-size!--because the user didn't know that they could change the resolution to anything higher.

There's a million stories like this, and each of those stories represents a potential MAS user.
post #45 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by serkol View Post

There are users like your mom and the MAS will be beneficial to them. I don't think that currently these users make the largest part of all Mac OS X users. This may change after a few years of existence of the MAS, but right now I think that most Mac OS X users can install apps.

The average Mac user is not in any way tech savvy. Neither is the average PC user. These have been the majority users for a very long time. What makes the iPhone and iPad popular is that all the complex stuff has been ironed out or removed completely, yet desktop OSes are still using a 4 decade old mindset. People want their computers to work, be intuitive and feel natural. The MAS offers this option.

Quote:
Why you guys keep talking about dmg and stuff? You download an app, and Mac OS X automatically mounts the dmg file and launches the installation script. No need to know what a dmg file is.

Most apps dont auto-mount and launch scripts and install. Most dont even have scripts, you are meant to drag-and-drop where you wish to place them. They also dont auto-unmount. You mention this as if its common sense when its not.
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post #46 of 114
BTW, which Apps would you like to see in the Store?
What apps are worth it, to let others to find them easily?
Please share the info.
post #47 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Povilas View Post

Rethink your BS.

Of course, this implies it was 'thought' to begin with.
post #48 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doorman. View Post

BTW, which Apps would you like to see in the Store?
What apps are worth it, to let others to find them easily?
Please share the info.

Here are a few paid and free apps from my 3rd-party app folder that I think could make it to the MAS.
  1. 1Password
  2. Adium
  3. Comic Life
  4. Dropbox
  5. Google Chrome
  6. iBank
  7. iStat Menus
  8. Movist
  9. Nike+ Connect
  10. OmniGraffle Lite
  11. OpenGL Extensions Viewer
  12. Paintbrush
  13. Soulver
  14. TextWrangler
  15. Transmit
  16. Transmission (would that be allowed?)
  17. WhatSize
  18. Xbench
  19. (A good note/flashcard app)
  20. (A good mass file name renamer app)
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post #49 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xian Zhu Xuande View Post

If Apple does this right, and I expect they might, you might be surprised. Even as a technology enthusiast I find those software listing sites to be frustrating and limited. I actually prefer Google searches more at times. Someone who is not familiar with these things will be far more interested in the Mac App Store, and those people will have already been introduced to the concept through their phone or iPod Touch.

It could be huge.

Currently, the main problem with the App Store is discoverability. From the developer perspective, if the app somehow manages to make a top apps list, or one of the other featured lists (which probably helps immensely in making a top list) , it's likely it will be noticed. But, if it doesn't, it's likely to not do so well. From the user perspective, it can be difficult to feel confident that you've really found the best app for your particular purpose. One of the problems is that App Ratings don't appear in search results. Another problem is inadequate categorization. The Genius feature is not at all useful in this regard. Apple needs to address these issues or the situation will only become worse as the total number of apps continues to grow.

So, it could be huge, but, without some improvement in discoverability, it may not help small/new developers as much as it potentially could.
post #50 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by spunkybart View Post

I changed your example just a bit.

In this example, I would ALWAYS buy it from Adobe, never from the Mac store, even if the prices were the same between Adobe and the Mac Store.

Reason? Because I CAN get a demo version on the Adobe site and try it out before I commit. At that point if the prices are the same (assuming), then I'm already doing business directly with Adobe and would never use the Mac store for that app.

I'm seeing zero advantage to me in a Mac store, except for giving me the ability to search for software that I might not know about from smaller software vendors.

This is all academic.

There is no way that Adobe is going to put the CS Suite in the app store for any price unless Apple changes large amounts of the rules they have already published, and unless Adobe wants to also radically alter it's product in several key ways.

It ain't going to happen.
post #51 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by smaceslin View Post

I for one like having the demo versions of some of the products on the iOS store. Really think Apple needs to rethink this decision...

Why? This is Mac we're talking about. If you want the beta or demo you go directly to the developer's site to get it. The Mac app store will be optional, unlike the iOS app store.
post #52 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by smaceslin View Post

I for one like having the demo versions of some of the products on the iOS store. Really think Apple needs to rethink this decision...

Agreed. I downloaded Evernote and was testing the free side version of what it does. Then I downloaded DevonThink Pro Office for a Free Trial that has limitations placed on it like 150 hours of use before you have to buy or trash cuz it will no longer work. I appreciate that since Evernote was FREE so no love lost if I never use again, HOWEVER, DevonThink Office Pro is $150.00. If I did not get to try before you buy, I would have exited that web page before it even finished downloading! As it stands, DevonThink Pro Office meets my needs better then Evernote and they have a $150.00 sale. Whereas, if I could not kick the tires so to speak, I would have passed for a lesser product with lower results, expectations and satisfaction on purchase. Plus Apple, unless your app store is going to sell .99¢ Fart apps for the Mac client! You would have missed out on... what's 30% or Apples cut of $150.00, oh yeah, $45.00. Alone, that's not much money, but multiply that by the same number of sales that the iPhone/iPad store is selling and now you are talking some serious coin!

Why have 30 second to 90 second song snippets to listen to or movie trailers, huh Apple?! I wonder if the developers can pool together and send Apple a letter saying, "We the undersigned agree to the following, "Any digital app store provider who wants to host, sell and profit from our content, agrees to our terms of free download trial offers." Hey it worked for Apple when they sent out that letter saying they were increasing the song sound bites to 90 seconds and if they didn't hear from the record companies, it was tacit approval of Apples move. And surely Apple doesn't want developers going over to Android camp, let alone MS when they too follow suite a year later!

I guess Apple has nothing better to do then keep track of returns and credits. Man who would have thought that Apple's accounting dept was up there with Apple Legal and Apple R&D with regards to job security and activity?!

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post #53 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

Why? This is Mac we're talking about. If you want the beta or demo you go directly to the developer's site to get it. The Mac app store will be optional, unlike the iOS app store.

Can you purchase from the devloper's site too and bypass Apple's monetory cut? Even though it's a few mouse clicks away, that's stupid. Come to my store but go some place else to try it before you buy it, huh?!

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post #54 of 114
So, why is this different from the way any other retail store sells software? I mean, when was the last time you got a demo, beta or anything not being the full retail version on BestBuy, Amazon, NewEgg or your local software store?

If you want the demo, etc.. you always visit the developers web site.. right?

On the iPhone store it is a whole different ballgame. They needed more control because it is an actual phone which we don't want hackers or viruses threatening your main communications device.
On a Mac, they don't need that tight of a control.
This particular store is more of a convenience for the developers and the customers... and a whole new way for Apple to monetize on this business... distribution on the Mac platform. So, it is just a win-win-win situation for all involved.

I don't see anything wrong with that.

And for developers... keep concentrating your marketing efforts... don't depend on Apple and the store. Shelf space is always a fight on any physical store. Just make sure you have a link on your website. If customers want your product, and are looking for it... they will find it. Make sure you have links all over the place pointing to your MacApp Store page.
post #55 of 114
30% is not a bad margin to get software listed in the app store. I doubt they can get any other software retailer to do it for any less. In fact I would bet that the margins at the Apple retail store for 3rd party software are much higher. Developers have always dealt with wholesale verses retail pricing when marketing their software. Software margins have to be high or retailers would not carry it. Some retailers like Amazon will even discount software up to 30% off the retail prices, so they must have a greater margin than 30% to be able to do that.
post #56 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

Can you purchase from the devloper's site too and bypass Apple's monetory cut? Even though it's a few mouse clicks away, that's stupid. Come to my store but go some place else to try it before you buy it, huh?!

I am guessing that YES.. you can buy from wherever you want. It is just another store.. not the ONLY store. As a customer it shouldn't cost you more. They take the cut from the developers set price.

For a customer... with the account active on iTunes/AppleID, then it is a matter of a single click and boom.. the download starts. On other sites you will probably have to go through the whole purchasing process.

Of course.. I am just guessing here with my limited logic. It would not make any sense to force developers to ONLY use the MacApp store... at least for the next couple of years.
post #57 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by muchomac View Post


On the iPhone store it is a whole different ballgame. They needed more control because it is an actual phone which we don't want hackers or viruses threatening your main communications device.
On a Mac, they don't need that tight of a control.

Right. So having viruses and hackers using my main computing device is fine. I get it.
Oh, and let me tell you my credit card number: 5486 2456 4426 2465, expiry date 12/12.
post #58 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by muchomac View Post

So, why is this different from the way any other retail store sells software? I mean, when was the last time you got a demo, beta or anything not being the full retail version on BestBuy, Amazon, NewEgg or your local software store?

Besides the fact that buying software from a B&M or warehouse stores is dying, there is no user installation of these apps, just click to buy and the rest is down for you including updates. It also allows you to buy a lot of very useful and simple apps that you simply wouldnt find in box stores. Where exactly could Best Buy sell an iStatMenus DVD? it would be silly.
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post #59 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doorman. View Post

Right. So having viruses and hackers using my main computing device is fine. I get it.
Oh, and let me tell you my credit card number: 5486 2456 4426 2465, expiry date 12/12.

Ill need the 3 digits on the back of the card and if you tell me your limit that would be swell. Id hate for you to have to pay any overage fees.
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post #60 of 114
I'm on the "bad decision" side of this one, simply because I've actually bought apps in the market place after liking the demo (also in Steam.)

Steam is a great example of where demos made me buy software. Plenty of game demos even allow a taste of the multiplayer portion of it. Left4Dead for instance had a LOT of people go from the demo to the game.

It makes sense to me to allow people to get a taste of what they will be getting, and clearly it makes sense to software companies. Forcing people to go navigate for these demos might prove to be a bad decision because people might just be lazy enough to not go to the website to download it. Not only that, but not everyone has a demo of their software, so people have to go and CHECK basically.

In the end, people will end up deciding to pass on that app they might have bought if they had seen how cool it was with the demo that they were too lazy to go check for.
post #61 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by smaceslin View Post

I for one like having the demo versions of some of the products on the iOS store. Really think Apple needs to rethink this decision...

I suspect in time once the other pieces are all in place and working this may come back within certain specific guide lines or at least perhaps in a separate section of the store. I do agree that the strict compliance rules make total sense. Using a Mac should be about consistency and no application should do something out of the ordinary with libraries and databases especially in these times of attacks on computers.
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post #62 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by muchomac View Post

So, why is this different from the way any other retail store sells software? I mean, when was the last time you got a demo, beta or anything not being the full retail version on BestBuy, Amazon, NewEgg or your local software store?

How is that thinking differently? lol. The capability is there, so why NOT use it?

Also, the first example that comes to mind is the food samplers at Cosco or BJ's but maybe that's because I'm hungry
post #63 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doorman. View Post

BTW, which Apps would you like to see in the Store?
What apps are worth it, to let others to find them easily?
Please share the info.

The ones from developers we would never of heard of without this. The wealth of talent this will open up to us. I am excited
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post #64 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

This is all academic.

There is no way that Adobe is going to put the CS Suite in the app store for any price unless Apple changes large amounts of the rules they have already published, and unless Adobe wants to also radically alter it's product in several key ways.

It ain't going to happen.

Like what?
post #65 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garysturn View Post

30% is not a bad margin to get software listed in the app store. I doubt they can get any other software retailer to do it for any less. In fact I would bet that the margins at the Apple retail store for 3rd party software are much higher. Developers have always dealt with wholesale verses retail pricing when marketing their software. Software margins have to be high or retailers would not carry it. Some retailers like Amazon will even discount software up to 30% off the retail prices, so they must have a greater margin than 30% to be able to do that.

I agree, 30% is a great margin for developers, even developers of expensive software, especially if you think of the MAS as compared to a physical retailer. To sell software at any physical retailer (such as something like Best Buy) they not only have to give Best Buy at least 30%, they also have the cost and labor of creating and shipping the physical product with a box, dvd, printed manuals, etc.
post #66 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

Like what?

For starters, the code base. I bet the MAS require it to be compiled using their SDK. Isn’t Adobe still using Carbon in some of their apps?
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post #67 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xian Zhu Xuande View Post

If Apple does this right, and I expect they might, you might be surprised. Even as a technology enthusiast I find those software listing sites to be frustrating and limited. I actually prefer Google searches more at times. Someone who is not familiar with these things will be far more interested in the Mac App Store, and those people will have already been introduced to the concept through their phone or iPod Touch.

It could be huge.

I agree. I think we also won't really know what the result is going to be until it actually launches. To the degree that it puts the consumer back in the driver seat in terms of software choices, and also raises the confidence level of the average person in terms of purchasing software, it could easily spur massive sales. Products that were previously thought to be popular by the pundits might not turn out to be actually popular when the end consumer is making all the decisions.

In my workplace for instance, licensing is strictly controlled. Support is doled out based on who paid for what and what contract it's on. At the same time, it's a University, so we are unable to lock down the machines the way a business might.

All of our Professors and Researchers are now going to have a store on their desktop. They are certainly going to be buying "unsupported" products, that we will now have to support. For example although we strongly encourage it's use on the sly, we don't officially support iWork at all, but now anyone with a computer and a credit card is going to be able to buy the suite in a few minutes.

I think we might see popular programs spread like viruses based on word of mouth reviews etc., and whether we "officially" support one product or another will be essentially irrelevant. How many people will download Pages and try it out for instance when it's a ten dollar download that takes less than a minute?

It might be another back door into the enterprise in that way. IT departments will have to specifically and completely disable the store to have any control whatsoever, and many of them (like mine) won't, or won't be able to for some reason.
post #68 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xian Zhu Xuande View Post

Not sure I agree. It is necessary on the mobile app store, but in the Mac app store there are plenty of ways to distribute software outside the store itself. Limitations such as this may help to provide a consistent, reliable experience.

If Apple provides information about any trial/demo/sample on their store and where such may be available, then of course there is no need to post the actual one there. It seems that many apps sell when folks have a chance to 'try before buying'. This, I think, would be especially true for new applications that do not already have an established customer base.
post #69 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

Like what?

Well, it's all shaking out as we speak so we don't know exactly at the moment. Some of the early "rules" announced by Apple that would get in the way are:

- standard installer required
- no serial numbers or authentication
- no suites
- no plug-ins

I think it might happen eventually, and Apple could change any of those rules tomorrow or simply not go with them when the store opens. My argument was that the store would have to change and the CS suite would have to change so much, that it would essentially be a different product or a different store by the time it appears.

My feeling (guess) is that Adobe will initially stay out of the store for those reasons and make a lot of noise about how "unfair" and "closed" it is, and how the store is going to be a giant fail, but then when it succeeds they will issue some special version of their products for the store, (probably a "lite" version or something) and still try to rape their regular customers with the original suite.

Eventually they will cave on everything because money talks, but Adobe has such a stick up the butt about Apple, that they will almost certainly blind themselves to the opportunity for a while at first.
post #70 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

Like what?

Like the fact that they won't be able to use license keys, and probably any number of terms in the App Store license that Adobe wouldn't care to abide by. Maybe some of their consumer products will end up in the app store (And it would be a huge improvement if they distributed Reader through the App Store.) but they aren't going to change their entire licensing practices any time soon just to sell CS through the App Store. Besides, given the cost and customer base, there would be little or no benefit to them doing so.
post #71 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by spunkybart View Post

I changed your example just a bit.

In this example, I would ALWAYS buy it from Adobe, never from the Mac store, even if the prices were the same between Adobe and the Mac Store.

Reason? Because I CAN get a demo version on the Adobe site and try it out before I commit. At that point if the prices are the same (assuming), then I'm already doing business directly with Adobe and would never use the Mac store for that app.

I'm seeing zero advantage to me in a Mac store, except for giving me the ability to search for software that I might not know about from smaller software vendors.

Elimination of software piracy is a HUGE advantage the app store will have over developers each trying to implement their own cumbersome registration processes that, in the end, don't really work. This should more than make up for Apple's percentage. I think Apple's store will also draw a lot of attention and sales to developers who don't otherwise get it. I think the advantages are huge to be in the store. Those that turn their nose up will soon have a change of heart when they see their customers turn to competing software vendors because they are selling where the buyers are shopping.
post #72 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doorman. View Post

Yeah, go buy a software which costs 200 USD without trying it out first...

Most likely you know what and why you are buying in that case.

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post #73 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronbo View Post

I think you're wrong. He's serious.

No one knows my mind....
post #74 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doorman. View Post

Yeah, go buy a software which costs 200 USD without trying it out first... These are not 0,79 cent Apps like on iPhone

The purpose of demos and betas are different. Und free software maybe of even greater value (good quality on par with non free counterparts, +saved money), and this is sometimes really the case.
And exactly because free apps are so popular - Apple does want to limit it - to make easier on their servers and increase return on investment.

The question is whether Apple is going to restrict the installation of the Software only through their Apple Store. Why not - they are doing it already for the phone. This would be really.... monopolistic... and "revolutionary"

Steve Jobs is not stupid, he will never do this.

He has stated as much. And I'm aware that beta and demo software is different. Thank you for the patronising (and unnecessary) comment though.

Users on this site once again getting worked up about nothing - if you want a demo version the company will provide a link to their web site to go and get it. The App Store will be for final version, tested, vetted software, it will be a very safe environment (relatively) for the average computer user and a good method of distribution for independent/smaller software developers.

Apple is not a monopoly, it is a tiny player in terms of computer software and hardware, this is just another way of obtaining software for the end user. It's really not worth the column inches it's attracting, or the typical hysteria that's flared up here.
post #75 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

I'm on the "bad decision" side of this one, simply because I've actually bought apps in the market place after liking the demo (also in Steam.)

Steam is a great example of where demos made me buy software. Plenty of game demos even allow a taste of the multiplayer portion of it. Left4Dead for instance had a LOT of people go from the demo to the game.

It makes sense to me to allow people to get a taste of what they will be getting, and clearly it makes sense to software companies. Forcing people to go navigate for these demos might prove to be a bad decision because people might just be lazy enough to not go to the website to download it. Not only that, but not everyone has a demo of their software, so people have to go and CHECK basically.

In the end, people will end up deciding to pass on that app they might have bought if they had seen how cool it was with the demo that they were too lazy to go check for.

Apple isn't telling people not to offer demos, it's telling them not to distribute the demos through the store. Why can't people understand that? Just provide a link to your web site for people to download a demo. It's a really easy concept and not a big deal.
post #76 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

If the app store is another source, then what's the difference?

Usually download sites are ad-supported and membership-supported so the prices of the software comes direct from the developer. In fact, the sites sometimes direct you straight to the purchase page of the developer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

You're not restricted to purchasing only from the app store, and there are other sources for demos and of course the developer's own web sites. Why would a developer shaft apple? They are going to want to take advantage of sales, not prevent their own software from selling.

It won't prevent it from selling though if they sell it direct to the consumer. The developers of Transmit would make either $34 via their site or $24 via the App Store. If they have an alternative transaction model that makes them an extra $10 per sale, that quickly adds up. If it was say 30% for apps under $10 and 10% and up to a fixed value of $50 beyond, the difference is negligible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism

I dont think anyone expects to see high-priced, low volume apps on the MAS because there is a very real possibility that the increase in exposure, and therefore sale, wont be enough to warrant its usage.

Quite the opposite. The low volume apps need as much exposure as they can get. High volume ones tend to get exposure via word of mouth. I'm thinking about Final Cut, Motion, AE and Photoshop effects plugins. It is so difficult to find those because they are low volume so the chances of a Mac user (10% marketshare) stumbling on a company website that uses the software package supported and can afford it are slim to none so a lot of companies don't even bother making Mac versions. I hope the App Store changes that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism

Heck, automatic app installations and updates are enough to make me happy as I still cant figure out how to explain to someone who is knew to Mac OS X or computing, how the Safari Downloads window, .DMG file, the mounted image, the app within, and the multiple copies users now have of those apps are all different things.

Yeah, I've seen that problem often. One way they can encourage use of the App Store is that the updates feature/notifications will only work if you purchase through the App Store.

I wonder what's going to happen on the games front. The movement with Steam seems to have died down a bit - no Modern Warfare, Bioshock and others. I could see World of Warcraft + expansions going on the App Store but it's a bit disappointing that publishers haven't supported Steam more. The Steamplay idea seemed really good and a way to get games developers on board with porting games over.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostface147

Any program that requires license keys or activation will NOT be allowed on the Mac app store.

That makes me wonder if that means the OS will require an update that contains some encryption mechanism to verify a valid app (e.g embedded in the OS kernel). You could of course jailbreak it like iOS but I don't think many people will want to risk screwing with their OS kernel which prevents updates. They can't distribute non-copyprotected apps so I would assume that's the case and I think it's a selling point they can use as users don't have to store them or type them in, nor can they resell apps or distribute serial codes for others.

It's also an easy way to install all your apps on a new machine as they are linked to your iTunes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mbarriault

Minor point, but check your math - 30% off of $1299 is $909.30

That would be my eyesight that needs checked. I used the calculator for it but read it as $999.30. I corrected the post to read $899.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueDjinn

It's the same reason Best Buy can get away with selling HDMI cables for $30 when you can buy them online for $3 apiece--if the Best Buy shopper doesn't know about the online source, they'll pony up the $30.

True, although a minor point would be that with the App Store, both options are a click away and I think people are accustomed to Googling. My mother is and that's the first place she goes for anything even sites she knows where they are. The strongest part of the App Store is the centralisation as it will eventually become known as *the* place to get Mac software. It's certainly better than their own software listing on apple.com.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism

Transmission (would that be allowed?)

I think file sharing apps won't be allowed but I really hope Apple lightens up on some restrictions. Like the use or emulated software. Blocking Python would prevent most 3D apps getting in which is just plain silly. They can block apps that use technology they don't bundle with the OS though (that includes Flash and Java now).

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism

(A good mass file name renamer app)

Try r-name:

http://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/12259/r-name

It doesn't have an undo but it gives you a good preview before renaming. You can get the source code and compile it as a universal binary.
post #77 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

Apple isn't telling people not to offer demos, it's telling them not to distribute the demos through the store. Why can't people understand that? Just provide a link to your web site for people to download a demo. It's a really easy concept and not a big deal.

Actually, they are telling people to go ahead and offer whatever demos they want to, but that they'll have to distribute those from their own websites.
post #78 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I think this article points to Apple having no plans to disallow non-MAS app installations. If they did, wouldnt they be allowing for the demos and trials (at least) without reminding devs that they should use their website to promote these types of apps?

For now.
post #79 of 114
Demos, free wares, beta versions, add supported softwares can be installed directly on mac. Mac app store does not kills direct installation options.

Paid software can be purchased on app store. This will allow developers to earn more money, than they do by selling software directly.

So lot of resources of apple get saved. They don't have to host free softwares. Direct installation is always available. Plus apple are not earning anything from it.

Its a smart decision.
post #80 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by BenRoethig View Post

Hopefully never. That being said, they like having the power to make choices for you, so I would say a small chance of this happening with Lion and with a much larger chance of it happening in 10.8.

Surely you jest ... 100% "lockdown will never happen ... you should know that. I'll say one thing for you Ben ..... you don't say much, but when you do, it usually doesn't mean anything .
Apple is not Appl ...... Please learn the difference!    
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Apple is not Appl ...... Please learn the difference!    
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