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Android activation pace hits a plateau below Apple's iOS

post #1 of 83
Thread Starter 
Android mobile activation numbers have leveled off dramatically after two years of rapid increases, signaling a maturing of the platform's growth phase as an alternative to Apple's iOS, which continues to claim a lead.

At the company's Android OS 2.3 Gingerbread release event today, Google noted that the current pace of Android's weekly device activations was at 1.5 million, or just over 214,000 per day. That compares with 270,000 iOS devices per day, as reported by Apple back in October.

Android's activation growth is less than 8 percent higher than the number Google cited in August, indicating a plateau in the growth of new Android activations after a summer of impressive growth figures that once swelled by 60 percent within just a month.

Observers closely watched iPhone sales looking for signs of change in demand, interpreting cyclical changes related to new model introductions as predictors of whether Apple could meet its initial goals or rival entrenched competitors including Microsoft's Windows Mobile, RIM's BlackBerry and Nokia's Symbian platform.

In the Android world however, the variety of hardware makers capable of shipping Android-based phones makes it more difficult to immediately count how many phones are being sold collectively. Google has instead preferred to publish activation numbers.

Throughout 2009, the pace of Android's activations nearly doubled from 30,000 per day in the spring ramping up to 60,000 new mobiles per day in February 2010. Rapid growth continued in 2010, enabling Android to hit 100,000 activations in May and 160,000 in June. By early August, Google was claiming 200,000 Android activations per day.



iOS vs Android activations

Speaking at Apple's iPod event in early September, Steve Jobs took issue with Google's activation numbers. Recapping iOS device sales at the event, Jobs told the audience, "People are throwing around a lot of numbers as to how many of their operating systems they're activating per day. We are activating a little over 230,000 iOS devices per day. And that's new activations."

Taking a shot at Google, Jobs added, "we think that some of our friends are counting upgrades in their numbers. If we counted upgrades in our numbers, they'd be way higher than 230,000. But we think the most appropriate way to count them is just new activations."

Google responded by saying that its reported Android activation numbers "do not include upgrades and are, in fact, only a portion of the Android devices in the market, since we only include devices that have Google services."

Google's latest December number of around 214,000 daily activations is not only below Apple's figures from September, but also only slightly better than it had claimed back in August, despite a new flurry of Android smartphones and new tablets such as the Samsung Galaxy Tab.

Update: Jobs updated Apple's activation figures in mid October during the company's quarterly earnings conference call, reporting that the company was activating 270,000 iOS devices per day on average, hitting occasional daily peaks of 300,000.

A tough nut to crack for everyone else

During September's Nokia World event, Nokia vice president Niklas Savander claimed his company had sold 260,000 phones per day during the summer, saying this figure was greater than Apple and Google's platforms combined. Electronista said the "claim was dubious."

However, the rapidly slowing pace of Android's activations, together with the slightly higher numbers reported by Apple and the rather low ceiling claimed by Nokia indicate that platform growth among the leading mobile device platforms is reaching an equilibrium, particularly in the market for smartphones.

This suggests new growth will have to come from either predatory growth that comes out of the hide of existing players, or from new categories of devices ranging from iPod touch-like mobile media players to iPad-like tablet devices.

This also provides a bleak outlook for new platforms hoping to enter the saturated mobile platform market, particularly Microsoft's new Windows Phone 7, HP's emerging Palm webOS 2.0, Samsung's Bada, and RIM's new QNX kernel paired with Adobe AIR, used in the forthcoming PlayBook.
post #2 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Speaking at Apple's iPod event in early September, Steve Jobs took issue with Google's activation numbers. Recapping iOS device sales at the event, Jobs told the audience, "People are throwing around a lot of numbers as to how many of their operating systems they're activating per day. We are activating a little over 230,000 iOS devices per day. And that's new activations."

Taking a shot at Google, Jobs added, "we think that some of our friends are counting upgrades in their numbers. If we counted upgrades in our numbers, they'd be way higher than 230,000. But we think the most appropriate way to count them is just new activations."



Given this information, it is hard to trust anything Google announces.
post #3 of 83
Not surprising, when the iPhone is strongly rumored to appear on Verizon as soon as next month. Watch iOS take off and Android dip when it happens. Why would anyone in their right mind choose Android on Verizon right now?
post #4 of 83
Got a brand new Droid X. 3 weeks later. Hating it.

A million complaints... and yet... it's free to me because of my employer, so where does that leave me? Having a droid.. and hating it... and not being able to do a damn thing about it. Google, please remove my # from your activations. I'd like to instead send my 'vote-by-activation' to Apple, who deserves it.

My iPad and iPod touch are 10x the device my supposedly top of the line phone is...

I'd be posting this from my droid.. except the battery is dead.. and the keyboard detection is crap.
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post #5 of 83
I almost feel bad for android when IOS hits Verizon wireless.
post #6 of 83
IOS market percentage has leveled off. No argument there, but the rest sounds like a lot of extrapolation. Last I heard Android was still growing fast in terms of percentage of new smartphone sales.
http://mashable.com/2010/11/02/iphone-android-nielsen/

If the overall smartphone market growth is leveling off, the Android numbers would make sense, but then IOS would show a steeper decline.
post #7 of 83
While early numbers for Windows Phone 7 haven't broken any records, I'd think that all the people that bought those phones, would've just defaulted to the Android platform if the choice was not there. Now that WP7 is available, I bet Android will begin to level off and possibly dip in market share.
Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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post #8 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

IOS market percentage has leveled off. No argument there, but the rest sounds like a lot of extrapolation. Last I heard Android was still growing fast in terms of percentage of new smartphone sales.
http://mashable.com/2010/11/02/iphone-android-nielsen/

If the overall smartphone market growth is leveling off, the Android numbers would make sense, but then IOS would show a steeper decline.

Exactly,i dont trust a chart that shows ios has 1 dot. Where is the ios data?
post #9 of 83
I really hope Apple opens up and offers the iPhone to all carriers worldwide. if they are going to compete for market-share they should address every audience and not make arbitrary restrictions to growth.

I also think to better compete with Android Apple should be will to offer a larger form factor - bigger screen. Maybe it is not Job's preference but the larger screen do seem attractive.
post #10 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

IOS market percentage has leveled off. No argument there, but the rest sounds like a lot of extrapolation. Last I heard Android was still growing fast in terms of percentage of new smartphone sales.
http://mashable.com/2010/11/02/iphone-android-nielsen/

If the overall smartphone market growth is leveling off, the Android numbers would make sense, but then IOS would show a steeper decline.

This is Daniel we are taking about, Mr. "I'm always dead on with my predictions", claiming Natal would be a still born vaporware to it would flop to uh oh, empirical evidence of sales of 2.5 million in 25 days, not shipped, sold.
post #11 of 83

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 5/4/12 at 12:53pm
post #12 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

IOS market percentage has leveled off. No argument there, but the rest sounds like a lot of extrapolation. Last I heard Android was still growing fast in terms of percentage of new smartphone sales.
http://mashable.com/2010/11/02/iphone-android-nielsen/

If the overall smartphone market growth is leveling off, the Android numbers would make sense, but then IOS would show a steeper decline.

You are arguing apples and oranges. Try reading the article and then arguing against what the article argues instead of just shifting the ground to a whole new topic.

Also, either you started with a typo or your totally trolling. (iOS market percentage is levelling off)
post #13 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post

While early numbers for Windows Phone 7 haven't broken any records, I'd think that all the people that bought those phones, would've just defaulted to the Android platform if the choice was not there. Now that WP7 is available, I bet Android will begin to level off and possibly dip in market share.

I think it has broken a record.... an all time low
post #14 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by junkie View Post

I really hope Apple opens up and offers the iPhone to all carriers worldwide. if they are going to compete for market-share they should address every audience and not make arbitrary restrictions to growth.

I also think to better compete with Android Apple should be will to offer a larger form factor - bigger screen. Maybe it is not Job's preference but the larger screen do seem attractive.

It's a problem in traditionally closed telecom markets like the US and Japan.

In areas where telecom companies compete with each other fiercely like Hong Kong, all 3G network providers offer the iPhone.
post #15 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by haruhiko View Post

It's a problem in traditionally closed telecom markets like the US and Japan.

In areas where telecom companies compete with each other fiercely like Hong Kong, all 3G network providers offer the iPhone.

US carriers are certainly competing with each other. The problem is that devices cannot be moved from one network to another - that is less efficient than it would be if that were not the case - but carriers do compete. It has an impact on competition but in most cases people are agreeing to a 2 year term, collecting a subsidy and then using the phone on the carrier for 2 years - so they contractually could not move anyway.

Apple could have supported CDMA a long time ago if they had wanted to but they set an exclusive deal with ATT and sought the benefits of that over market-share.

The result was a market opportunity for Android where they could address the other ~70% of the market with devices. This was just a mistake by Apple. They were blindsided by Google, their partner up till that point, going on the attack. They were somewhat arrogant not to recognize that not all US smartphone customers would or could move to ATT - so all of those customers were left out in the cold.

Hopefully they can recover a lot of lost ground when the VZ iPhone hits. Clearly though, Android has traction in the market and with developers now that it would not have were iPhone on Verizon sooner. Then again, the competition got Apple to loosen its crazy policies toward developers which would have harmed the platform if not altered.
post #16 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

IOS market percentage has leveled off. No argument there, but the rest sounds like a lot of extrapolation. Last I heard Android was still growing fast in terms of percentage of new smartphone sales.
http://mashable.com/2010/11/02/iphone-android-nielsen/

If the overall smartphone market growth is leveling off, the Android numbers would make sense, but then IOS would show a steeper decline.

iOS is not leveling off - that may be the temporary state in the US but you need to look at the international market where Apple is not even fully launched yet with iPhone4 and has a long way to go with the international rollout of the iPad.
post #17 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by junkie View Post

Hopefully they can recover a lot of lost ground when the VZ iPhone hits. Clearly though, Android has traction in the market and with developers now that it would not have were iPhone on Verizon sooner. Then again, the competition got Apple to loosen its crazy policies toward developers which would have harmed the platform if not altered.

That is the leading school of thought.
However
There is no way that Apple could have kept up with production if they had released an 'open' phone.
They wouldn't have been able to service a global market and probably only North America. If you are limited to a certain number of inventory, then why not make the most out of it and give ATT exclusivity until a market has been established and production streamlined.

I would argue that it was more important to establish a global market share then total domination in only 1 country. ie, don't put all your eggs in one basket.
post #18 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by junkie View Post

I really hope Apple opens up and offers the iPhone to all carriers worldwide. if they are going to compete for market-share they should address every audience and not make arbitrary restrictions to growth.

I also think to better compete with Android Apple should be will to offer a larger form factor - bigger screen. Maybe it is not Job's preference but the larger screen do seem attractive.

Fortunately you're not running Apple. Apple's rollouts are strategic and in the best interest of the company. They couldn't possibly meet demand to expand their penetration more rapidly so they take a very intelligent and strategic approach to their rollouts and partnerships while maintaining high demand for those that do carry the iPhone, and a high level of anticipation for the customers of the carriers that don't.

Although heavily criticized for their AT&T exclusive deal, people seem to forget, or not realize, that by doing what they did with AT&T they wrestled control from the carrier for the device - they broke the mold that now allows all the others to jump into the market. However, Android is an exception to this as the carriers are doing all they can to make their iterations of Android unique and different which is not necessarily in the best interest of the consumer. Nor is their ability to control the timing of OS upgrades / improvements in this heavily fragmented OS.

Apple - keep doing what you're doing!
post #19 of 83
As is the custom every poster here interprets the data to suit their own personal bias. Pick your analyst, pick your survey, pick your data, spin it so it fits your preconception. We all do it. They all do it. Everybody does it. Makes it all sort of useless and stupid doesn't it.
post #20 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by junkie View Post

US carriers are certainly competing with each other. The problem is that devices cannot be moved from one network to another - that is less efficient than it would be if that were not the case - but carriers do compete. It has an impact on competition but in most cases people are agreeing to a 2 year term, collecting a subsidy and then using the phone on the carrier for 2 years - so they contractually could not move anyway.

Apple could have supported CDMA a long time ago if they had wanted to but they set an exclusive deal with ATT and sought the benefits of that over market-share.

The result was a market opportunity for Android where they could address the other ~70% of the market with devices. This was just a mistake by Apple. They were blindsided by Google, their partner up till that point, going on the attack. They were somewhat arrogant not to recognize that not all US smartphone customers would or could move to ATT - so all of those customers were left out in the cold.

Hopefully they can recover a lot of lost ground when the VZ iPhone hits. Clearly though, Android has traction in the market and with developers now that it would not have were iPhone on Verizon sooner. Then again, the competition got Apple to loosen its crazy policies toward developers which would have harmed the platform if not altered.

What nonsense - you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about. See my post above. Apple did exactly the right thing at the right time to change the market forever. And crazy policies? Please. Again, you have no clue. Just look at the market and see which developers are really being successful on what platform.
post #21 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

You are arguing apples and oranges. Try reading the article and then arguing against what the article argues instead of just shifting the ground to a whole new topic.

Also, either you started with a typo or your totally trolling. (iOS market percentage is levelling off)

You're right, the point of this post is that Android activations have grown by only 8% since August. He is comparing current Android activations with old IOS stats from September. The most current numbers I have found for IOS, the Neilsen link, show IOS in decline while Android shows strong growth. So, this post leaves the unwitting reader with the impression that IOS is growing faster and this is simply not the case based on the last study. Without a new study, it's hard to conclude anything based on the number provided by google at a press conference.
post #22 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Not Unlike Myself View Post

Got a brand new Droid X. 3 weeks later. Hating it.

A million complaints... and yet... it's free to me because of my employer, so where does that leave me?

Your problem is you don't have skin in the game. When you fork out your own money for something and are disappointed you may be tempted to forgive its inadequacies to avoid looking like you made a bad choice. When you get it free and it sucks you're free to be honest.
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post #23 of 83
SJ said in October on the earnings call " Apple has activated around 275,000 iOS devices per day on average for the past 30 days with a peak of almost 300,000 iOS devices per day on a few of those days."
post #24 of 83
Wait until Verizon iPhone come, and we'll see Android flooding ebay.
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post #25 of 83
So, big deal, everyone who runs Linux on their home computers now also has a Netbook and an Android phone. Next they'll be claiming phenomenal growth for Android tablets...
post #26 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by bstring View Post

You're right, the point of this post is that Android activations have grown by only 8% since August. He is comparing current Android activations with old IOS stats from September. The most current numbers I have found for IOS, the Neilsen link, show IOS in decline while Android shows strong growth. So, this post leaves the unwitting reader with the impression that IOS is growing faster and this is simply not the case based on the last study. Without a new study, it's hard to conclude anything based on the number provided by google at a press conference.

"The most popular smartphones are the Apple iPhone and RIM Blackberry..."

"Apple’s iPhone and devices with the Android operating system were the “most desired” among likely smartphone upgraders, with Apple showing a slight lead among those age 55+ , 18 to 24, and 25 to 34."


http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/...ttle-heats-up/

"Although the top three worldwide mobile device manufacturers Nokia, Samsung and LG remained the same – albeit with reduced market share - the third quarter saw Apple rise into the top five manufacturers, surpassing RIM for fourth place (see Table 1)."

"Apple delivered a stellar performance in the third quarter of 2010, selling 13.5 million units. It could have sold more but for its ongoing supply constraints and is now in fourth place worldwide. The iPhone is sold in 89 countries through 166 CSPs. Apple's sales in Europe, Asia and Japan, more than doubled from the third quarter of 2009 and sales in Western Europe delivered Apple the third spot in the regional ranking. While Apple remains focused on consumers, enterprise adoption of the iPhone and iPad has grown."


Apple went from 2.3$ share in 3Q2009 to 3.2% share in 3Q2010.

Note that Nokia, Samsung and LG all saw share losses in 2010. The big winner was "other".

http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1466313

"Gartner estimates Android phones accounted for 75 percent to 80 percent of Verizon Wireless's smartphone trade in the third quarter of 2010. Manufacturers such as Samsung continued to launch high-end devices like the Galaxy S. But manufacturers also launched Android devices at lower prices to target different consumer segments. For example, ZTE launched a sub-£100 Android phone with Orange in the prepay U.K. market. For its part, Google is maintaining a fast pace of OS updates. Each version brings new features and polish to Android, and the level of innovation is a major differentiator.

Apple performed extremely well thanks to the iPhone 4. Relationships with multiple CSPs gave Apple wider channel reach internationally, and the strong ecosystem around iTunes and the App Store continued to help Apple dominate. Apple's share of the smartphone market surpassed RIM in North America to put it second behind Android. In Western Europe, iPhone sales doubled year-on-year, making Apple the third-largest vendor behind Nokia and Samsung in the overall devices market."


Funny decline. It lost 1 percentage point in smartphone sales in 2010. Android was, of course, the big winner going from 3.5% to 25.5%. But Apple wasn't the big loser in that exchange...it was everyone else that took it in the shorts.

What the article is saying is that Android's 800% increase has leveled off. Which isn't unexpected given that 800% increase isn't sustainable. Likewise Apple's original hefty share growth rate was unsustainable. If the iPhone appears on Verizon I expect that 75-80% of Verizon smartphone sales percentage for Android to drop significantly.

Also expect WP7 to staunch WM6 losses and perhaps get MS share back into the 5%+ range. Where is it going to take that share from? It isn't likely iOS so it likely will come at the expense of Symbian and Android. Especially with WP7 phones coming from the same manufacturers as Android phones.

Gartner's conclusion?

“Apple's dramatic expansion of iOS with the iPad and the continuing success of the iPod Touch are important sales achievements in their own right. But more importantly they contribute to the strength of Apple's ecosystem and the iPhone in a way that smartphone-only manufacturers cannot compete with,” Ms. Milanesi said. “To a developer, the iPod Touch and iPhone (and to a lesser extent the iPad) are effectively the same device and a single market opportunity. While Android is increasingly available on media tablets and media players like the Galaxy Player, it lags far behind iOS's multi-device presence. Apple claims it is activating around 275,000 iOS devices per day on average — that's a compelling market for any developer. And developers' applications in turn attract users.”
post #27 of 83
Looks like Androids growth is slowing down. Does this data represent the world or only U.S?
post #28 of 83
I thought the main reason platform sales numbers are important is for developers deciding which to develop for. But these days we have more direct data in terms of App Store sales. Shouldn't they be comparing those instead?
post #29 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by zindako View Post

I almost feel bad for android when IOS hits Verizon wireless.

Dan you should have included the information from Monday's Wall Street Journal blog. Verizon is already smarting from the effect of iPhone 4 sales at AT&T which is causing Verizon churn. WSJ mentions Droid has lost so much of its luster on Verizon that they are floating the possibility Verizon will hammer out an exclusive deal with Apple to lock the iPhone out of Sprint and T-Mobile in the states.

I spilled my coffee on reading that I was so shocked at that new evidence Android was not doing all that well.

I have always said that with the exception of a few rare pieces of exceptional hardware that if you had an Android you probably had a genuine piece of 2010 smart phone crap the Chinese shoved out the door and marketed to unsuspecting consumers.

Research shows very few would ever buy another Android based on their current experience.
post #30 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post

Fortunately you're not running Apple. Apple's rollouts are strategic and in the best interest of the company. They couldn't possibly meet demand to expand their penetration more rapidly so they take a very intelligent and strategic approach to their rollouts and partnerships while maintaining high demand for those that do carry the iPhone, and a high level of anticipation for the customers of the carriers that don't.

Although heavily criticized for their AT&T exclusive deal, people seem to forget, or not realize, that by doing what they did with AT&T they wrestled control from the carrier for the device - they broke the mold that now allows all the others to jump into the market. However, Android is an exception to this as the carriers are doing all they can to make their iterations of Android unique and different which is not necessarily in the best interest of the consumer. Nor is their ability to control the timing of OS upgrades / improvements in this heavily fragmented OS.

The iPhone has been out for three years. Apple should be able to meet any demand that exists by now. If they can't, that is called mismanagement.

I think you are believing false hype. Apple did not change that much in terms of wrestling the control from the carrier. There were smart phone devices on the market already that carriers let ship as they were - the Palm Treo's being among them. Apple did start with a unique deal with ATT but by the time the 3G was shipped they had pretty much the same terms as every other phone being sold. It's just not the case that the terms of the market for phones were rewritten and even today, clearly, ATT exerts control over what happens on iPhones. Think tethering and the delay for MMS.

In any case, after the first year Apple could have gotten whatever terms it wanted from other carriers. They did not need to wait till 2011 to ship to their second US carrier - if they even do that. Waiting this long was not about control of the device - there is no basis to think that, it was about the level of subsidy that ATT was ready to pay to keep things exclusive - that margin was what Apple opted for over market-share.

Not everything Apple does is right. It's a good company with great products but they can and do f things up from time to time. Get over it.
post #31 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post

And crazy policies? Please. Again, you have no clue. Just look at the market and see which developers are really being successful on what platform.

The crazy policies were about blocking Google Voice and other apps, having very restrictive terms in how a native app could be developed, not allowing developers to communicate with each other. That stuff.

They say success hides problems. It is because when some aspects of something work well it becomes hard to criticize things. But actually, you want to still pay attention to problems because that is what keeps you competitive. So don't freak out and assume that because some aspects of something work well that people who think it could be better are wrong. They actually may be indicating the next wave of improvements that are needed.
post #32 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

What the article is saying is that Android's 800% increase has leveled off. Which isn't unexpected given that 800% increase isn't sustainable. Likewise Apple's original hefty share growth rate was unsustainable. If the iPhone appears on Verizon I expect that 75-80% of Verizon smartphone sales percentage for Android to drop significantly.

The next few quarters will be interesting. For Verizon, I'd expect 5-10% attrition (android to iphone) over six months.
post #33 of 83
LOL...does this mean they ran out of l33t haXXX0rz nerds to sell this to? Now they have to convince people who don't know what "root" means to buy one.

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post #34 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

iOS vs Android activations

Speaking at Apple's iPod event in early September, Steve Jobs took issue with Google's activation numbers. Recapping iOS device sales at the event, Jobs told the audience, "People are throwing around a lot of numbers as to how many of their operating systems they're activating per day. We are activating a little over 230,000 iOS devices per day. And that's new activations."

Taking a shot at Google, Jobs added, "we think that some of our friends are counting upgrades in their numbers. If we counted upgrades in our numbers, they'd be way higher than 230,000. But we think the most appropriate way to count them is just new activations."

Google responded by saying that its reported Android activation numbers "do not include upgrades and are, in fact, only a portion of the Android devices in the market, since we only include devices that have Google services."

Google's latest December number of around 214,000 daily activations is not only below Apple's figures from September, but also only slightly better than it had claimed back in August, despite a new flurry of Android smartphones and new tablets such as the Samsung Galaxy Tab.

Update: Jobs updated Apple's activation figures in mid October during the company's quarterly earnings conference call, reporting that the company was activating 270,000 iOS devices per day on average, hitting occasional daily peaks of 300,000.

There are only few Android phones that are comparable to iPhone 3GS, e.g. Droid, Xperia, HTC 4G, etc. But when comparing activations, Android counts everything including crappy Chinese phones/tablets that ship with 1.6.
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post #35 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by junkie View Post

The crazy policies were about blocking Google Voice and other apps, having very restrictive terms in how a native app could be developed, not allowing developers to communicate with each other. That stuff.

They say success hides problems. It is because when some aspects of something work well it becomes hard to criticize things. But actually, you want to still pay attention to problems because that is what keeps you competitive. So don't freak out and assume that because some aspects of something work well that people who think it could be better are wrong. They actually may be indicating the next wave of improvements that are needed.

Very well put. The crazy policies are what drove me away and toward Android... and ultimately away from all other apple products. For 15 years I was a strong proponent, an evangelist, but no longer. I still follow apple news and I think policies will gradually change as they have to a point where the attraction comes back.
post #36 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4phun View Post

Research shows very few would ever buy another Android based on their current experience.

Who's research? A very recent study by ChangeWave Research puts Android device satisfaction within a few percentages of iOS. Motorola being #2 of all companies.
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post #37 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

You are arguing apples and oranges.... Also, either you started with a typo or your totally trolling. (iOS market percentage is levelling off)

I agree about apples and oranges, but not the typo. While Apple's product trademarks call for a lower-case "i" at the beginnings of their names, English calls for capital letters at the beginnings of sentences. I don't care how cool these gadgets are (and, yeah, they're pretty cool), or how influential Apple aesthetics are at the moment; they do not trump centuries of linguistic construction which has a pretty vital purpose: to alert readers to a new chunk of thought. IPhones and iOS changed many rules, but not that one.

Also, just for the record: "You're totally trolling," not "your."
post #38 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by cincytee View Post

I agree about apples and oranges, but not the typo. While Apple's product trademarks call for a lower-case "i" at the beginnings of their names, English calls for capital letters at the beginnings of sentences. I don't care how cool these gadgets are (and, yeah, they're pretty cool), or how influential Apple aesthetics are at the moment; they do not trump centuries of linguistic construction which has a pretty vital purpose: to alert readers to a new chunk of thought. IPhones and iOS changed many rules, but not that one.

Also, just for the record: "You're totally trolling," not "your."

Those who nitpick the grammar of others need to be really sure they are above reproach themselves or they may end up looking a bit foolish. I am referring to your use of the semicolon. It just doesn't seem right to me. Of course it could have been a typo. But then so could your target's "your."

Apple's "i" is part of a proper name. It just looks silly as IPhone or IMac in a headline or even the start of a sentence. Because of typography the eye wants to see it as "L" Phone. Rules of punctuation and grammar do change with usage over time, usually for the sake of clarity and intelligibility. I think this one is a good candidate. Time will tell. How would you start a sentence with the name of the poet e.e. cummings? "E. e. cummings . . . ? Seems a little silly following the rules there, doesn't it? I think some latitude is in order in these cases.
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post #39 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by cincytee View Post

I agree about apples and oranges, but not the typo. While Apple's product trademarks call for a lower-case "i" at the beginnings of their names, English calls for capital letters at the beginnings of sentences. I don't care how cool these gadgets are (and, yeah, they're pretty cool), or how influential Apple aesthetics are at the moment; they do not trump centuries of linguistic construction which has a pretty vital purpose: to alert readers to a new chunk of thought. IPhones and iOS changed many rules, but not that one.

Also, just for the record: "You're totally trolling," not "your."

I think this guy is a grammar nuts, (or nut?)
post #40 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by junkie View Post

I really hope Apple opens up and offers the iPhone to all carriers worldwide. if they are going to compete for market-share they should address every audience and not make arbitrary restrictions to growth.

I also think to better compete with Android Apple should be will to offer a larger form factor - bigger screen. Maybe it is not Job's preference but the larger screen do seem attractive.

You still don't get it! Apple isn't into market share numbers. Apple is all about customer satisfaction and profits, they go hand in hand.

Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

 

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete...

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Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

 

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete...

Reply
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