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22 months after announcement, Google Latitude app comes to Apple's iPhone

post #1 of 44
Thread Starter 
First announced in February 2009, the Google Latitude application for iPhone -- previously rejected from the App Store -- has been approved and is now available.

The free application (iTunes link) allows users to see where their friends are at the moment, and share their current location as well. Google Latitude uses the multitasking capabilities of iOS 4 and the iPhone 4 and iPhone 3GS to share a current location in the background via GPS.

Features of Latitude, listed by Google, are:
See your friends on a map -- find out who's nearby and meet up.
Share your location continuously with whomever you choose -- help friends and family stay in touch with you, even when you can't take out your phone.
Control your privacy -- share only city-level information, hide your location, or turn off background updating at any time.
The approval of Google Latitude marks the second high-profile reversal for Apple in reviewing the search giant's iPhone software. In November, the official Google Voice application for iPhone was approved after more than a year of rejection from Apple.



Google Latitude was first announced in February 2009, when the search giant revealed its plans to release the software for the iPhone via Apple's App Store.

Google, in its dispute with Apple over the Google Voice application, revealed last year to the Federal Communications Commission that the Google Latitude software was initially rejected because Apple believed the software could replace the native Maps application included with the iPhone. Apple also expressed concern that the software would "create user confusion" with the preloaded Maps software.

The rejection, plus the lack of multitasking on the iPhone at the time, led Google to release a Web application that allowed users to access the Latitude service through the Mobile Safari browser.

Apple softened its stance on Google's iPhone applications after it published the App Store Review Guidelines in September. The candid document summarizes Apple's policies on iOS software, and noted that applications that "look similar to apps bundled on the iPhone" would be rejected.
post #2 of 44
I got it, it's boring, deleted, one star.
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post #3 of 44
What about Google Maps 5.0??? It has latitude integrated and many more features which the iPhone version has been strapped by. Is this Apple restricting Google or does Google not want the full version on the iOS?

Does anyone know? Is this coming?
post #4 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

I got it, it's boring, deleted, one star.

I have not yet used it myself but will believe your review is true.

Dont know why even after all this time, Google still throws out sucky iPhone apps.

Google Voice does not even support iPod Touch after 1 year.
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post #5 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by lav1daloca View Post

What about Google Maps 5.0??? It has latitude integrated and many more features which the iPhone version has been strapped by. Is this Apple restricting Google or does Google not want the full version on the iOS?

Does anyone know? Is this coming?

Yes, 22 months from now. Haven't you been paying attention?
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post #6 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple believed the software could replace the native Maps application included with the iPhone. Apple also expressed concern that the software would "create user confusion" with the preloaded Maps software.

.


Apple is correct. The average iPhone user will become confused. I wish that the government would stay out of this stuff.
post #7 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by lav1daloca View Post

What about Google Maps 5.0??? It has latitude integrated and many more features which the iPhone version has been strapped by. Is this Apple restricting Google or does Google not want the full version on the iOS?

Does anyone know? Is this coming?

Apple is working on their own map service. They bought PlaceBase few years ago. I would think it should be coming up soon, now that the new server farm is complete in NC. Apple didn't like when Google start advertising in the Maps App.
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post #8 of 44
Can someone please explain to me the appeal of services like this and Foursquare? All I see them as is someone willingly letting people stalk them and even worse, letting random people know when they are NOT at home. I just don't get it.
post #9 of 44
More Google crap to boycott. Whose with me? Jan?

I gave google too much latitude myself and they screwed me, so sorry but, never again.
post #10 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

Can someone please explain to me the appeal of services like this and Foursquare? All I see them as is someone willingly letting people stalk them and even worse, letting random people know when they are NOT at home. I just don't get it.

There's nothing to get. Your analysis is spot on, 100% accurate. These things are stupid, stupid, stupid, terrible ideas.

It makes me cringe to think of how dumb people make potential criminals lives so much easier than they've ever been before. Most people publish their activities and locations up to the minute, and they also don't even own guns Anymore!

How dumb can you possibly be? I'm pretty certain facebook foursquare lattitude and the like are the barometer.
post #11 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

More Google crap to boycott. Whose with me? Jan?

I gave google too much latitude myself and they screwed me, so sorry but, never again.

I quit trusting them back when they loudly proclaimed to the world that they were going to violate copyright laws by copying every book in existence without permission. And they were proud of it.

I really can't believe how many people fall for their crap. I rare;y use Google for anything. Bing or Yahoo is good enough for most of my searches (I think I've used Google's search engine twice in the past few months - and none of Google's other services).
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post #12 of 44
Glympse is more useful to me than Latitude. I used it on a road trip so my wife could track my little girls and I up and down I-95. The feature set matches up with what I was looking for much better than Latitude.

With Glympse: The sharing automatically expires. You can group contacts you want to share with. You can see when people checked in on you...
post #13 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

More Google crap to boycott. Whose with me? Jan?

I gave google too much latitude myself and they screwed me, so sorry but, never again.

I'm right there with you. Google offerings are just a lot of white noise to my ears.
post #14 of 44
apple developed the google maps app for the iphone with the help of google - thats why it has nice fluid animations etc. and has been said earlier apple has now bought their own mapping company .. so they are at an opposite vector from google on all things mappy
post #15 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

Can someone please explain to me the appeal of services like this and Foursquare? All I see them as is someone willingly letting people stalk them and even worse, letting random people know when they are NOT at home. I just don't get it.

If you leave the paranoia at home for a second it's pretty obvious. I live in a city and have a bunch of friends, the app lets me see where they are at any given time so I know whether to drop by the coffee shop or not or who's at the local hangout.

For those brought up in a world where this was impossible, it seems a bit scary, but for most folks, it just seems like a good way to find out where your friends are. The only danger is if you have "friends" that are not really your friends, and that's pretty much the user's fault really.
post #16 of 44
"Control your privacy"

Ha! Believe that at your own risk. I don't trust Google, Facebook, or any other company that offers "free" services of this sort to really protect my privacy.

Not that I don't use their services... I use gmail all the time. But I have no expectation for privacy with gmail, which is why it's not my only e-mail account.
post #17 of 44
Let the new digital age of "STALKING" begin!
post #18 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

If you leave the paranoia at home for a second it's pretty obvious. I live in a city and have a bunch of friends, the app lets me see where they are at any given time so I know whether to drop by the coffee shop or not or who's at the local hangout.

For those brought up in a world where this was impossible, it seems a bit scary, but for most folks, it just seems like a good way to find out where your friends are. The only danger is if you have "friends" that are not really your friends, and that's pretty much the user's fault really.

Agreed. I would have loved to have this technology back when I was in university. I'm sure lots of you have at least one or two friends that is habitually late. It'd be great to know that these people are almost about to arrive, haven't left their house yet, etc.
post #19 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

I got it, it's boring, deleted, one star.

That is a great point, actually. The problem with Latitude is that it requires one to have friends for it to be useful.
post #20 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

Can someone please explain to me the appeal of services like this and Foursquare? All I see them as is someone willingly letting people stalk them and even worse, letting random people know when they are NOT at home. I just don't get it.

Latitude does not let random people know when you are not at home. Latitude lets select people that you presumably trust know approximately where you are. You can choose to publish a precise location or a city-level location.

I think it makes perfect sense to let my wife know exactly where I am. I obviously won't allow acquaintances whom I do not trust any access to my location.
post #21 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by igxqrrl View Post

Latitude does not let random people know when you are not at home. Latitude lets select people that you presumably trust know approximately where you are. You can choose to publish a precise location or a city-level location.

I think it makes perfect sense to let my wife know exactly where I am. I obviously won't allow acquaintances whom I do not trust any access to my location.

No, but you let Google access your location. Seems to me that you should be thinking about limiting private information to people you trust BEFORE you turn over all your private information to Google so that they can sell it to the highest bidder.
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post #22 of 44
They'd better give iOS users their free Google Navigation app instead of this "social" crapware.
post #23 of 44
I love this app, actually. My friends all have android phones, and on the weekends I can see who's where and decide where I want to go.

It really boggles the mind that this would take so long to get to iphone. Trust me, if you and your friends use it, you won't need to be calling them asking where they are at, and you can show up at the pool hall or bar they're at and surprise them, or they will even surprise you.
post #24 of 44
This app is going to end some relationships, that's for sure. LOL

Wife has iPhone. Hubby has iPhone. Wife says she is going to run some errands. Hubby has been a little insecure about relationship because of gut feeling. Wifey is actually at boyfriend-on-the-sides's house having a little extracurricular fun. Hubby checks her on Latitude. Wonders why that errand happens to be at the location of a hotel in the next town over. Hubby makes a quick drive to identified hotel. Puts ear up to door of room that seems to house his wife...and he hears heavy breathing and moaning. Yea...this is going to be interesting. Stories should start surfacing in about a year when the media starts to see a patter between infidelity and the use of location tracking apps.
post #25 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

No, but you let Google access your location. Seems to me that you should be thinking about limiting private information to people you trust BEFORE you turn over all your private information to Google so that they can sell it to the highest bidder.

It's hard to get away from it these days, unfortunately. Even when you call into like Pizza Hut, and they ask for your phone number, they bind that to your address, and sell your information.

Someone explained to me once that privacy laws are more of a state thing, not a federal thing, so there are loopholes.
post #26 of 44
Thanks to Google, Dell can earn some money!
Latitude is a Dell's trademark.
post #27 of 44
Already installed it on the GF's cell

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wurm5150 View Post

Let the new digital age of "STALKING" begin!
post #28 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacFinder View Post

Thanks to Google, Dell can earn some money!
Latitude is a Dell's trademark.


Dell uses the mark for hardware, annd so I don't know if they have a strong claim to it as identifying their software to consumers.
post #29 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by igxqrrl View Post

Latitude does not let random people know when you are not at home. Latitude lets select people that you presumably trust know approximately where you are. You can choose to publish a precise location or a city-level location.

I think it makes perfect sense to let my wife know exactly where I am. I obviously won't allow acquaintances whom I do not trust any access to my location.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

No, but you let Google access your location. Seems to me that you should be thinking about limiting private information to people you trust BEFORE you turn over all your private information to Google so that they can sell it to the highest bidder.

jragosta has it right.

People, don't be stupid. When you use these services, you ARE giving up some of your most personal data (where and when you are in real-time) to a whole bunch of people you don't know -- inside Google (or Foursquare or whoever). And there is little in the way of protection if (more like when) they decide to start milking the value out of that data. Actually, they already are, but I mean via sharing or selling certain portions of that data. By that time many of you will have passed along enough information so your trends are well known in addition to real-time data. With this kind of data Google has enough smarts and CPU to better know where you are likely to be next Thursday at 2pm than you do yourself! And you can never, ever, ever, ever take that data back.

In addition to these companies ability to analyze, milk profits from, and eventually SHARE your data in the future, they are perfect targets for the government (hopefully just the U.S.) to snag all that data as well. Personally, I believe our feds are the only organization that has any business at all with this kind of data, but I know many people who believe the government should not have this data, and yet they freely pass it along to Google and their ilk. Where do you think the agencies will get this data from?!?!

Stupid, stupid sheeple. All for a little coolness/convenience.
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post #30 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtm135 View Post

Already installed it on the GF's cell

Hope you're joking, but if not, I can see this relationship is built on trust...
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post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

It's hard to get away from it these days, unfortunately. Even when you call into like Pizza Hut, and they ask for your phone number, they bind that to your address, and sell your information.

Hahahaha! You give your real phone # to pizza joints?? How quaint and naive.

Yes, you're right, most of them package up this info and sell to others, including marketing firms. You are under no obligation to give them that data.

Two pieces of advice, for those who care:

1) Do NOT give these clowns a real phone #. Most places never call it back to verify, it's only used as a unique identifier. Try it in advance of ordering something critical though, like a SuperBowl party, just to be sure.

2) Do NOT use your real name. Use something that you can identify with the pizza (or whatever product) company, so you can track if/when they've sold your personal data.
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post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

Hahahaha! You give your real phone # to pizza joints?? How quaint and naive.

Yes, you're right, most of them package up this info and sell to others, including marketing firms. You are under no obligation to give them that data.

Two pieces of advice, for those who care:

1) Do NOT give these clowns a real phone #. Most places never call it back to verify, it's only used as a unique identifier. Try it in advance of ordering something critical though, like a SuperBowl party, just to be sure.

2) Do NOT use your real name. Use something that you can identify with the pizza (or whatever product) company, so you can track if/when they've sold your personal data.

"I got three passports, couple of visas
don't even know my real name
High on a hillside, trucks are loading
everything's ready to roll
I sleep in the daytime, I work in the nightime
I might not ever get home"

-David Byrne (Life During Wartime)

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

I love this app, actually. My friends all have android phones, and on the weekends I can see who's where and decide where I want to go.

It really boggles the mind that this would take so long to get to iphone. Trust me, if you and your friends use it, you won't need to be calling them asking where they are at, and you can show up at the pool hall or bar they're at and surprise them, or they will even surprise you.

Where's the surprise, you know they are there, they know you are coming, like I said BORING.
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post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

jragosta has it right.

People, don't be stupid. When you use these services, you ARE giving up some of your most personal data (where and when you are in real-time) to a whole bunch of people you don't know -- inside Google (or Foursquare or whoever). And there is little in the way of protection if (more like when) they decide to start milking the value out of that data. Actually, they already are, but I mean via sharing or selling certain portions of that data. By that time many of you will have passed along enough information so your trends are well known in addition to real-time data. With this kind of data Google has enough smarts and CPU to better know where you are likely to be next Thursday at 2pm than you do yourself! And you can never, ever, ever, ever take that data back.

In addition to these companies ability to analyze, milk profits from, and eventually SHARE your data in the future, they are perfect targets for the government (hopefully just the U.S.) to snag all that data as well. Personally, I believe our feds are the only organization that has any business at all with this kind of data, but I know many people who believe the government should not have this data, and yet they freely pass it along to Google and their ilk. Where do you think the agencies will get this data from?!?!

Stupid, stupid sheeple. All for a little coolness/convenience.


If you were to google 'google latitude privacy policy', here's what you would see:

Quote:
Google stores only the most recent automatic update or location selection you manually entered on our servers. If you hide in Latitude, we don't store your location.

I am one of those who believe that the government has no business knowing where I am. It boggles my mind that someone would feel otherwise. On the other hand if I decide, of my own volition, that I am willing to trade a small piece of personal information in exchange for a useful service, that seems like a reasonable deal to me.
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by enohpI View Post

Dell uses the mark for hardware, annd so I don't know if they have a strong claim to it as identifying their software to consumers.

But it might "create user confusion" with people who have Dell Latitudes and use Google Latitude.
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by igxqrrl View Post

I am one of those who believe that the government has no business knowing where I am. It boggles my mind that someone would feel otherwise.

So you should ask yourself this: If you were working in a gov't agency and wanted to get your hands on real-time location data for millions of people, how would you do it? This is not a rhetorical question. Private companies are pulling together massive amounts of personal data right now because people are willingly handing it over without considering what will happen to it over time. That's just foolish. Some of the most public-facing data can be found here: http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/faq.html , but there's a lot going on that is not public, and while Google is a semi-good player right now, policies/management/laws change all the time. And if you think this particular location data is not being gathered and saved by anyone else, well, hahaha. I'll shut my mouth before I get in trouble.

Quote:
Originally Posted by igxqrrl View Post

On the other hand if I decide, of my own volition, that I am willing to trade a small piece of personal information in exchange for a useful service, that seems like a reasonable deal to me.

Of course it's your call. Perhaps you don't have any care about who all knows your whereabouts in real-time (but it seems by your comment that you do), however, many people are totally naive and/or don't understand the significance and "opportunity" this type of data presents. Especially when the benefit is merely a little coolness or convenience. Many governments and organizations would have performed atrocities in the past to get this data, now they can just sniff it out and/or extract it by force whenever they feel the need. Oh, and don't forget, your location data gets married with your search profile (google), your web surfing profile (via adsense), and any other "service-related" data you provide, either explicitly or implicitly. These services are not free!

Do whatever you want, just don't be naive, and don't mislead others by pulling them along. All personal data you provide is ultimately up for grabs.
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post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post

"I got three passports, couple of visas
don't even know my real name
High on a hillside, trucks are loading
everything's ready to roll
I sleep in the daytime, I work in the nightime
I might not ever get home"

-David Byrne (Life During Wartime)

Massive, massive win!
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

Private companies are pulling together massive amounts of personal data right now because people are willingly handing it over without considering what will happen to it over time.

Isn't Apple one of these companies?

Quote:
Do whatever you want, just don't be naive, and don't mislead others by pulling them along. All personal data you provide is ultimately up for grabs.

What's really naive is believing that Apple is completely innocent of all the things we accuse other companies of doing with personal data.
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post


Do whatever you want, just don't be naive, and don't mislead others by pulling them along. All personal data you provide is ultimately up for grabs.

At least with this app it is voluntary to let others get at your info, unlike what the NSA does with everything we do on the Internet. Narus STA 6400 is all I'm saying.
post #40 of 44
Why don't you just use Apple's own Find My iPhone app? It's native and kicks ass. My wife and I use it all the time. Sharing doesn't expire either.
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