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Apple releases iTunes 10.1.1 to address crashing, bugs

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Apple on Wednesday released a minor update for its iTunes software, as version 10.1.1 addresses various bugs and issues that could cause it to crash.

iTunes 10.1.1 is now available as a direct download or via Software Update. Changes in the software, according to Apple, are:
Addresses an issue where some music videos may not play on Macs equipped with NVIDIA GeForce 9400 or 9600 graphics.
Resolves an issue where iTunes may unexpectedly quit when deleting a playlist that has the iTunes Sidebar showing.
Fixes a problem where iTunes may unexpectedly quit when connecting an iPod to a Mac equipped with a PowerPC processor.
Addresses an issue where some music videos may not sync to an iPod, iPhone, or iPad.
The previous update, iTunes 10.1, was released in November. It added support for iOS 4.2, as well as AirPlay functionality with the Apple TV.
post #2 of 28
Does anyone know if they have put the close, minimise and maximise buttons back to where they should be? I hate an inconsistent GUI.
iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
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post #3 of 28
@saarek - No they did not.
post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

Does anyone know if they have put the close, minimise and maximise buttons back to where they should be? I hate an inconsistent GUI.

http://hints.macworld.com/article.ph...00901223846748
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post #5 of 28

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 5/4/12 at 12:40pm
post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

The Mac App Store submission guidelines requires that apps conform to Apple's Human Interface Guidelines.

Should Apple reject iTunes?

" DO as I say, NOT as I DO!"
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

The Mac App Store submission guidelines requires that apps conform to Apple's Human Interface Guidelines.

Should Apple reject iTunes?

Apple also uses private APIs in Mac OS and iOS. I guess all those should be rejected, too, since the guidelines forbid it. \
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

Does anyone know if they have put the close, minimise and maximise buttons back to where they should be? I hate an inconsistent GUI.

Hm, the sheer fact that a decision is not understood (or liked) by everybody, does not make it inconsistent or wrong...

iTunes had these vertical buttons in the "zoomed" (mini player) mode for ages. Now it is consistent between modes.
post #9 of 28
please don't pick on other members
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

Does anyone know if they have put the close, minimise and maximise buttons back to where they should be? I hate an inconsistent GUI.

Considering CLOSE is where it always was, thats the one people use most. Minimize moved which might be annoying. But considering the "maximize" button doesn't even do what you'd expect in iTunes it makes sense to have a different layout since the buttons don't do the normal thing to begin with. It was always confusing why you couldn't maximize itunes.
post #11 of 28
Now if Apple would just fix the feature bloat.
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dualie View Post

Now if Apple would just fix the feature bloat.

SO you'd rather have one app for movies, one for books, one for movies, one for the store, one for apps, one for podcasts, one for syncing - you think that's a more efficient way of doing things? Just turn off those features you don't like in preferences....
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

It added support for iOS 4.2, as well as AirPlay functionality with the Apple TV.

They certainly did, although it would be nice if they finished it.
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A reputation is not built upon the restful domain of one's comfort zone; it is made out of stalwart exposition of your core beliefs, for all challenges to disprove them as irrelevant hubris.- Berp...
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post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

SO you'd rather have one app for movies, one for books, one for movies, one for the store, one for apps, one for podcasts, one for syncing - you think that's a more efficient way of doing things? Just turn off those features you don't like in preferences....

I mostly agree with you on that, especially since 10.x is by far the fastest version of iTunes ever, especially when accessing media from network storage. iTunes still has its flaws, not being able to easily play back video on a second screen remains one of my most-hated annoyances, but bloat is not really one of them.

Still, I would definitely love a separate app for transferring data between the Mac and iPhone/iPod touch/iPad apps. File transfer as a function of a media player really makes no sense (to me). And I know several people who simply do not use it, because they can't even remember where to find it (on low resolution screens the file transfer section is not even in view by default), and then downrate applications that do not support alternate means of transfer. Apple's design choices are normally a lot better than that.
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

not being able to easily play back video on a second screen remains one of my most-hated annoyances

I've never had a problem with this. In iTunes preferences, under "playback", choose "in a separate window" for the "Play Films and TV Programmes:" setting. Then, when playing a video, you can drag it to the second monitor. If you then go full screen, it'll full-screen on the external monitor.
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post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

I've never had a problem with this. In iTunes preferences, under "playback", choose "in a separate window" for the "Play Films and TV Programmes:" setting. Then, when playing a video, you can drag it to the second monitor. If you then go full screen, it'll full-screen on the external monitor.

What you say is true, and it is certainly no problem when viewing a feature length movie or a TV show. Just, I happen to own some records with complete concert videos as "extras", ingeniously broken down into individual clips (e.g. Robyn Hitchcock's "I often dream of trains in New York" comes with 21 individual video clips)... would you really say: manually dragging and maximizing 21 clips in 60 minutes is the best possible solution?
post #17 of 28
please don't pick on other members
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

I mostly agree with you on that, especially since 10.x is by far the fastest version of iTunes ever, especially when accessing media from network storage. iTunes still has its flaws, not being able to easily play back video on a second screen remains one of my most-hated annoyances, but bloat is not really one of them.

Still, I would definitely love a separate app for transferring data between the Mac and iPhone/iPod touch/iPad apps. File transfer as a function of a media player really makes no sense (to me). And I know several people who simply do not use it, because they can't even remember where to find it (on low resolution screens the file transfer section is not even in view by default), and then downrate applications that do not support alternate means of transfer. Apple's design choices are normally a lot better than that.

Except if you handle your iPhone content manually. Then it makes sense to be able to see the content while syncing. Having said that - I find iTunes a bit of an unwieldy beast and i find the iPhone / touch / pad management a little clumsy. I don't know how many times I have found deactivated Email accounts re-activated and alll sorts of other syncing mishaps (I manage several devices). I also find a lack of clarity when it comes to syncing over mm v iTunes. Then there is iPhoto which invariably messes with my photos on the iPhone so yeah, a leaner better designed syncing app has my vote.
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

What you say is true, and it is certainly no problem when viewing a feature length movie or a TV show. Just, I happen to own some records with complete concert videos as "extras", ingeniously broken down into individual clips (e.g. Robyn Hitchcock's "I often dream of trains in New York" comes with 21 individual video clips)... would you really say: manually dragging and maximizing 21 clips in 60 minutes is the best possible solution?

Good point. Sounds like a job for AppleScript.
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post #20 of 28
please stay on-topic - Mr. H
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

SO you'd rather have one app for movies, one for books, one for movies, one for the store, one for apps, one for podcasts, one for syncing - you think that's a more efficient way of doing things? Just turn off those features you don't like in preferences....

Thanks for the over-simplistic and presumptuous interpretation of my comment.

Turning off the features in the preferences is pointless because all that heavyweight code still exists, and it makes iTunes clumsy, bloated and awkward. A light-weight player that only loads all the extra crap when it's actually needed would be preferable. This could be done easily enough without bogging down the entire app with everything all at once. Besides, even if they were separate apps, what would be so wrong with that? We use separate apps constantly on our Macs and iPhones. Why should iTunes be any different? It could be a suite of apps with modules that are only launched when called. That would leave the basic player to actually do what its name implies: play tunes instead of trying to be everything to everybody all at once and in the process become a bloated resource hog that requires a large download just to update, which is done regularly.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

I mostly agree with you on that, especially since 10.x is by far the fastest version of iTunes ever, especially when accessing media from network storage. iTunes still has its flaws, not being able to easily play back video on a second screen remains one of my most-hated annoyances, but bloat is not really one of them.

Still, I would definitely love a separate app for transferring data between the Mac and iPhone/iPod touch/iPad apps. File transfer as a function of a media player really makes no sense (to me). And I know several people who simply do not use it, because they can't even remember where to find it (on low resolution screens the file transfer section is not even in view by default), and then downrate applications that do not support alternate means of transfer. Apple's design choices are normally a lot better than that.

Simple answer here is to shift your attitude toward the app - is it a "media player" or is it a media organisation tool? - seems to be both to me. I'd suggest that apple have used iTunes for this purpose because it already has a massive install base, so why not use the app that people already have installed across windows and mac? Plug in phone/pad and it just syncs. If my 64 year old dad can do it, anyone can do it.
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

Simple answer here is to shift your attitude toward the app - is it a "media player" or is it a media organisation tool? - seems to be both to me. I'd suggest that apple have used iTunes for this purpose because it already has a massive install base, so why not use the app that people already have installed across windows and mac? Plug in phone/pad and it just syncs. If my 64 year old dad can do it, anyone can do it.

Well, not trying to disagree for the sake of it, but even if I call it a "media organization tool" that does not really bring the syncing of mind maps, business diagrams or financial reports to mind at least I do not normally refer to these things as "media".

People, and especially those with little computer know-how, somehow associate actions involving files with the Finder (or the Explorer, if they can't afford a Mac) and media buying / organizing / playback with iTunes. As a long time user, I still remember iTunes being part of the iLife package - it was always positioned far away from anything looking like "business". All of a sudden it is right in the middle.

Another quibble is the fact that sometimes I just want to transfer one small file, but thanks to the automatic back-up and sync being initiated, as soon as I plug the device in (I know that this can be turned off, but I don't really want to, as I would hate to not have my most current podcasts etc. on the device when I commute), the transfer can easily take 10-15 minutes to finish. Not good.

I have high expectations when it comes to Apple, and normally they live up to them, but this file transfer concept is a mess (especially when you use iDevices for business, having people learn how to wade through all the different screens in iTunes, when file transfer is the only thing they need - everything else syncs over the air - is not ideal). Why can't these transfer enabled apps just mount as folders in the Finder? Would be so easy...
post #24 of 28
please don't pick on other members
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

The Mac App Store submission guidelines requires that apps conform to Apple's Human Interface Guidelines.

Curious have you read the interface guidelines.

I have. And no where does it outlaw the vertical placement.
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

SO you'd rather have one app for movies, one for books, one for movies, one for the store, one for apps, one for podcasts, one for syncing - you think that's a more efficient way of doing things? Just turn off those features you don't like in preferences....

Get rid of Genius and Ping for starters- Apple spyware.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

Get rid of Genius and Ping for starters- Apple spyware.

You have to activate them so if Apple is spying on you it is because you left the curtains open and told them they could
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

Get rid of Genius and Ping for starters- Apple spyware.

Yeah, that's exactly what spies normally do... Force you to read their terms and conditions and ask you several times, if you really want to activate them. And they all come with a menu item to turn them off anytime you like...

Why, oh why, do countries invest billions into counterintelligence, when lack of intelligence seems to be the much bigger problem?
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