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Apple TV, iTunes downloads slowed by Google DNS - Page 2

post #41 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by akf2000 View Post

wow, definitely experienced this problem with slowwww rentals and Google DNS. I've switched to my ISP DNS now, thanks for the article.

When I first got the new AppleTV I could not stream any rented stuff because it would always tell me it would take like 2 hours or more. I would do my renting on the Mac or iPad to Airplay it to the TV. I thought I give this idea a try. I was using OpenDNS. Change to my ISP DNS and the process to rent a movie and watch took like 30 Seconds. I watch the whole movie (The Town) and I did not experience any delays or buffing at all like I did before the change.
post #42 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by razorpit View Post

Sounds like you are ignorant to a lot. If you think there is a search engine that doesn't store results you are living in a fantasy land.

Which is why I said when. It's perfectly possible for a group of privacy advocates to work collaboratively to create such a thing and host it in countries whose 'security' laws are more reasonable.

Actually there's no reason an encrypted, P2P search engine could not be developed with no backbone to subpoena.

EDIT: Looks like such a thing does exist and I think it will get my patronage. http://www.yauba.com
post #43 of 91
Appleinsider is one of the few Apple oriented website to offer, most of the time, quality content. That article does not qualify for that category.
post #44 of 91
It's like the AI linkbait pulled the Googlians out of the woodwork. This must constitute that 20% where you don't have to work?

Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

From the Google Public DNS Privacy Policy:

Is any of the information collected stored with my Google account?
No.

Does Google share the information it collects from the Google Public DNS service with anyone else?
No.

Is information about my queries to Google Public DNS shared with other Google properties, such as Search, Gmail, ads networks, etc.?
No.

.....

Pretty simple policy. But please feel free to continue wearing the tin hat so that Google's orbital mind control laser doesn't affect you.

An FAQ can say whatever they want it to say, whatever is expedient, whatever furthers their corporate goals. It's not as if this carries the legal weight of, for example, a sworn deposition by Eric Schmidt.

How is this any different from an FAQ that says, for instance, that they don't collect and/or index data about or from WiFi access points during their Street View sweeps?

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

    AT&T believes their LTE coverage is adequate

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   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

    AT&T believes their LTE coverage is adequate

Reply
post #45 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider
... Last December, Google launched Google DNS as a free service intended to give Google the means to track every single server you access on the internet, even when other tracking methods fail to be effective...

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

There, I fixed it for you.

Scary.

One of the reasons I am not a fan of Gmail or Google Groups.

One cannot just assume the agglomination (my new word, you first heard it here) of net services is a good thing.
The Universe is Intelligent and Friendly
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The Universe is Intelligent and Friendly
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post #46 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by yuusharo View Post

There is so much misinformation in this article it makes me angry. Link baiting is one thing, but this is flat out making stories up.

A variety of reports? One guy... ONE GUY... mentions in a blog that he changed his DNS and magically his precious Apple TV was working again. I appreciate the explanation of how DNS can be used to locate you, which I never knew before, but this anecdotal evidence reported by a random blogger being treated as fact is upsetting to say the least. And of course, the fact that he coincidentally used Google's DNS is the only reason this story even exists. Had he been using OpenDNS or Level 3 DNS, there wouldn't be any drama cooked up in the non-existent Google vs Apple wars...

Please, this is tripe and nothing more. The bias never ends. FYI, I personally feel its irresponsible to tell people to switch back to their local providers DNS, which may end up being *SLOWER* than OpenDNS or Google can provide, and may be more susceptible to DNS spoofing and phishing attacks due to ISPs not updating their servers regularly, which puts users at risk of attack.

This makes perfect sense, and is not a 'slam' at Google. Get your feathers down.
I've been having this problem since I got my AppleTV gen 2, and have been frustrated by 30 hour downloads.
I've been using Google DNS, and after reading this article, switched back to my default Comcast, and presto, I'm now downloading quickly enough to start viewing movies within 1-2 minutes.
Staggering difference.

The issue is not any particular failing with Google or OpenDNS (I wish I could stay with OpenDNS for its parental controls). The fact is the way Akamai works. It identifies the entry closest to the Akamai routers, and if you're giving it some Google DNS server far away from you (in routing terms), then you totally defeat (and actually worsen) the purpose of Akamai.
Advertise your real DNS location and the system works like a charm.
post #47 of 91
Stop fighting, Akamai confirmed they do use DNS lookup as a method to pick what Server you download from.

I asked on twitter when tuaw posted this news via zdnet.

http://twitter.com/#!/Akamai/status/16927585028014080
post #48 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by freckledbruh View Post

I won't go as far to say that this is rubbish, but I have never had an issue with Google's DNS and my AppleTV (original recipe). In fact, everything downloads and streams (YouTube, etc.) much better than my crappy ISP.

I'm guessing that ATV2 somehow has Akamai more baked in, because I agree that I still have my ATV1 running along side my ATV2 and it has been running fine with OpenDNS.
post #49 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post

No, that's not how DNS works. Your machine does an initial lookup for the address record and then your machine caches it for some period of time. Once your machine is downloading it has already connected and wouldn't need another lookup. JoeMaller doesn't post the source of his research and DED links to faulty research.

I haven't had any problems with Google DNS. I'm rather fond of Open DNS myself.

Correct!!! DNS is a lookup, sure that initial lookup could take a milisecond longer if your local ISP DNS is closer in terms of latency.....but it also could NOT have the info you need and it would have to forward the request or hit a root server. In either case once you have the IP of the media streaming server, DNS is out of the picture.

Appleinsider ONCE AGAIN showing their NUT JOB bias. Google is a major threat to Apple, therefore and enemy of AI???

Loones run this blog.
post #50 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Rick_V_ View Post

As many have already said, this article is misinformed on many levels, and shows that the author doesn't really understand DNS at all.

Dilger may work for Apple PR, but is 100% correct in this case. Not using your ISP DNS server can cause exactly the effect described, for exactly the reason described.

Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso

Yeah ddawson said it simply.

DNS has nothing to do with the speed at which data is flowing through the pipe.

DNS as a reason for slow Apple TV downloads (or any other data downloads) doesn't make sense.

WHOOOSH! The sound of the article going right over your head.

Quote:
Originally Posted by _Rick_V_

Instead, CDN's will look up your location based on your IP address (and other magic). Just as a quick example, try looking up your location by googling "IP address location" (hint, try http://www.ipaddresslocation.org). If you don't know what you're public IP address is, look it up on http://www.whatismyip.com.

It is too late. Once you've connected to the CDN, they can't reconnect you to a closer mirror in most cases. The DNS lookup is their chance to steer you the right way. In some cases, they can fine tune it within the routing tables, but the DNS lookup is a biggie.
post #51 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by yuusharo View Post

There is so much misinformation in this article it makes me angry. Link baiting is one thing, but this is flat out making stories up.

A variety of reports? One guy... ONE GUY... mentions in a blog that he changed his DNS and magically his precious Apple TV was working again. I appreciate the explanation of how DNS can be used to locate you, which I never knew before, but this anecdotal evidence reported by a random blogger being treated as fact is upsetting to say the least. And of course, the fact that he coincidentally used Google's DNS is the only reason this story even exists. Had he been using OpenDNS or Level 3 DNS, there wouldn't be any drama cooked up in the non-existent Google vs Apple wars...

Please, this is tripe and nothing more. The bias never ends. FYI, I personally feel its irresponsible to tell people to switch back to their local providers DNS, which may end up being *SLOWER* than OpenDNS or Google can provide, and may be more susceptible to DNS spoofing and phishing attacks due to ISPs not updating their servers regularly, which puts users at risk of attack.

Amen!
post #52 of 91
My ISP has an Akamai server farm in their building, and they say in order to benefit from it we must use their DNS. So I think it can matter what DNS you use. The DNS takes a name and sends an IP address back, and certain ISPs will change their DNS to send back IP addresses of computers they know are nearby.
post #53 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranson View Post

You're missing the point. .... is located far away (significantly increasing latency), and also likely overburdened because of other Google DNS users receiving the same cached DNS record. Other posters are right, though, this is not specifically a Google problem, it's also a problem with OpenDNS and other commonly used alternatives to your ISP's DNS server. In our high-bandwidth world where geolocation is key, when you give up your ISP's regional DNS for an external server that may be far away, you're going to see this issue.

Thanks!!! Most of the fast responders missed the ball! Some people still think the world ends at their doorstep!
post #54 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

I'm guessing that ATV2 somehow has Akamai more baked in, because I agree that I still have my ATV1 running along side my ATV2 and it has been running fine with OpenDNS.

It depends how well openDNS/googleDNS match the preference of Akmai...

That means for those whom dont get it:

- Use ISP DNS = works allways.
- Use openDNS/googleDNS = it works or it doesnt work, it dependson things.

But Akmai might make this work better but dont hold your breath...
post #55 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by bettieblue View Post

Correct!!! DNS is a lookup, sure that initial lookup could take a milisecond longer if your local ISP DNS is closer in terms of latency.....but it also could NOT have the info you need and it would have to forward the request or hit a root server. In either case once you have the IP of the media streaming server, DNS is out of the picture.

Appleinsider ONCE AGAIN showing their NUT JOB bias. Google is a major threat to Apple, therefore and enemy of AI???

Loones run this blog.

Yes its true there are a lot of nutjobs that dont see the whole picture like you in this case. They allways assume that the do but that is seldom the case.

To mee it doesnt look like it would be impossible for akmai to optimise for all but its up to them... There are allways going to be things that screw up things like these eg. proxys and so on. To Akmai its important that 99,5% of customers are happy and the rest get screwd, not many people will fool around with dns servers anyhow...
post #56 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by razorpit View Post

Sounds like you are ignorant to a lot. If you think there is a search engine that doesn't store results you are living in a fantasy land. That information is priceless for many reasons. Who would you prefer to trust with that data? Russia, China, England? You can't even walk/drive down the street without being on multiple traffic cameras.

Ask.com has a feature called AskEraser which if enabled, they claim will result in search data not being retained.

As for for not trusting the UK with data, that would be rather funny if you are US based. The NSA monitor everything, whether legally entitled to or not. Then there are the mandated GPS chips in cell phones supposedly for when emergency numbers are dialed: http://tpmmuckraker.talkingpointsmem...int_by_law.php

Quote:
About AskEraser
Ask Jeeves is serious about privacy. We are committed to meeting and exceeding emerging privacy trends in the search industry. That is why we offer AskEraser, which, when enabled, deletes your search activity from Ask Jeeves servers within hours, except in rare circumstances as described below.
Your privacy on Ask Jeeves

At Ask Jeeves, we believe that you as a user should have the power to control the usage of your search history. When enabled, AskEraser will completely delete your search queries and data from Ask Jeeves servers, including: your IP address, User ID and Session ID cookies, as well as the complete text of your search query--all within a matter of hours, except in rare circumstances
post #57 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by OwlBoy View Post

Stop fighting, Akamai confirmed they do use DNS lookup as a method to pick what Server you download from.

I asked on twitter when tuaw posted this news via zdnet.

http://twitter.com/#!/Akamai/status/16927585028014080

Yes, they're using DNS. Trouble is, they're using THEIRS rather than YOURS. In other words, whatever you are using is not going to change what they use or, to rephrase that, changing DNS is not going to assign you a different IP address (or location).


RT.
post #58 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

It's like the AI linkbait pulled the Googlians out of the woodwork.

Or maybe I just don't have some ridiculous loyalty to a company that doesn't give two shakes more about you than other corporate entitity.

Sorry, the tin hat conspiracy theory crap about Google gets old. And so do the stupid attacks on anyone who has anything vaguely positive about anything not from Apple.
post #59 of 91
Love these threads.

This is very plausible, why......?

Because even though DNS server do just translate name to addresses (and reverse), what DNS's like OpenDNS and Google DNS do not do is house the records in an authoritive way.

So why does switching DNS from Google to a local provider based one work?

Because CDN's like Akamai switch authoritative responses for domain addresses based on DNS lookups of the whois record (which contains total physical address information) to local information caches. These records have way more accurate/consistent physical location information then an IP trace (which I believe is still used in the event an address cannot be found appropriately).

DNS flow diagram

Request:
User request -> DNS -> lookup for root domain on root servers -> authoritative domain server

Reply:
Authoritative domain server -> DNS -> user

This isnt how Akamai always routes, I believe they prefer client information directly when possible, but as browsers lock down and hardware devices are hardened, its very difficult sometimes. This also is only a single layer of how they try to route content locally.
post #60 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8CoreWhore View Post

For those of you saying that's not how DNS works - Daniel isn't refering to how DNS works... he refering to how Akmai uses DNS look up information, so they can determine which server to send the streaming content from:

FTA: "CDNs like Akamai, which Apple works with to deliver iTunes downloads, use DNS lookup information to locate where users are, and then optimize content delivery via the nearest available server."

When you use a central DNS, Vs one near your home, Akmai ends up using a server to deliver to you that is less than ideal, sometimes by thousands of miles.

Further more... he wrote DNS service like Google and Open DNS and the other one... Not JUST Google... he's not singling them out or stearing away from others... he specifically wrote central DNS servers, as opposed to your local one. And he does say that the Google like ones can speed up your service-- just not if your heavy content is poorly routed. Re-read the article and drop your overly defensiveness to see what he ACTUALLY wrote.

and how does akamai know which DNS server you resolved from? the location is done via reverse IP lookup where they take your IP address. this is done on akamai's side via their DNS infrastructure

the reason people use google DNS is that it's always up and it's fast. ISP DNS servers are like bastard step children where they put them on the oldest hardware they have lying around at the time

DNS lookups and content routing are two different things

i'm not a DNS expert but unless Google is poisoning their results and sending you to the wrong servers i don't see how a DNS lookup is a slow down issue. it could be the way akamai has their server IP's assigned for load balancing and Google DNS is screwing it up
post #61 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

and how does akamai know which DNS server you resolved from? the location is done via reverse IP lookup where they take your IP address. this is done on akamai's side via their DNS infrastructure

the reason people use google DNS is that it's always up and it's fast. ISP DNS servers are like bastard step children where they put them on the oldest hardware they have lying around at the time

DNS lookups and content routing are two different things

i'm not a DNS expert but unless Google is poisoning their results and sending you to the wrong servers i don't see how a DNS lookup is a slow down issue. it could be the way akamai has their server IP's assigned for load balancing and Google DNS is screwing it up

Google is not poisoning, Akamai is....

When the DNS resolver from google goes and looks for the root server, Akamai authoratative host reverses on the Google DNS server because client IP is not passed through, only the originating DNS request client IP is passed though. In this case google DNS acts as a proxy. Google and Cisco were looking at extending DNS requests to include client IP for CDN's as part of the original DNS request, not sure where they ever got with that.

That being said, the theoretical absolute optimal way (given a good IP lookup and a couple other factors) to get on the best CDN cache to you would be to set your computer to use Akamai DNS directly. This is offset by things like ISPs putting content caches inside their networks. One that comes to mind is Comcast. In that case they do return a comcast server which may not be geographically optimal to you but which may in fact return much greater throughput and/or reduce data charges.

See http://blogs.gartner.com/lydia_leong...sion-and-cdns/ They word it better then I do.
post #62 of 91
I work for a CDN (just the same as Akamai), and I'd like pass some knowledge along.

When an anycast (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anycast [Every CDN depends on anycast]) based DNS system is used, you are load balanced to a nearby POP/node/cluster (whatever you want to call it.) The idea behind this is to route you to a very close (geographically that is) server that will be able to return the desired data to you as fast as possible. In making the connection as close as possible, you reduce the possibility of introducing unnecessary latency. Currently, the speed limit is the speed of light (based on use of photons in the fiber links). Until we find a way around this, bringing the server close to you is the next best option.

So, with anycast already mentioned, the next part of this is the load balancing. When you use something like 4.2.2.1 (and it's relatives), OpenDNS, or Google DNS, you are relying on a system that is making a best attempt at determining where you are. If it works as intended, nothing goes awry. If it there is a fault, then you may get routed to a server that is quite far from you (geographically, as well as latency-based.) This can occur if you use OpenDNS in London, UK, and you get routed to a server in New York, NY instead of somewhere in England. This can cause for a slow internet experience, which generally sucks.

If you use your ISP's DNS is that you can be much more certain that you are being routed to a set of nameservers that are close to you, and can generate a quicker response to your queries. The added bonus of using your ISP's DNS is that a CDN such as Akamai almost certainly has a POP (or cluster, etc) located inside of the ISPs network, and so when you get load balanced to the CDN (instead of the DNS), you are hitting servers that are not only close to you, but don't have to traverse the internet's main backbones. This means you get what you want very quickly.

When people use an anycast based DNS system, and complain of slow load times, they are almost certainly being routed to a POP that is either far away from them, or is just overloaded (or both.) I've run into this myself when attempting to retrieve updated Apps from the iTunes App Store when using 4.2.2.1. When I changed my router over to use my ISP's DNS (in this case, Road Runner), the files came in at the max speed my connection would allow.

If you use an anycast based DNS, and are encountering a less than great internet experience, I encourage you to switch to your local ISP DNS. Things should be much better as a result.

I hope this helps shed some light onto the situation.

Cheers.
post #63 of 91
going to have to check my router logs at home to see where my netflix data is coming from. i use my PS3 mostly to stream netflix and use Google DNS. too much trouble with time warner cable DNS. it takes netflix a minute or so to load on my PS3. will see if DNS makes a difference

netflix uses level 3 as their CDN

one time a friend of mine found a MacBook and i installed SL on it for him. i checked my router logs when i was doing the apple update and i think the data came from the midwest since apple uses akamai for the apple updates. and i've used google dns or open dns since it came out. i'm on the east coast
post #64 of 91
F*ck this headline, this story and Daniel Eran Dilger. Treat your readers with some damn respect. I've been reading appleinsider for several years - today I unsubscribe. see ya
post #65 of 91
http://code.google.com/p/namebench/

It is a google site, but seems to help a little in this thread.
post #66 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

From the Google Public DNS Privacy Policy:

And translations...

Quote:
Is any of the information collected stored with my Google account?
No.

No, it's stored in your Google Profile, which is linked to your Google Account, along with everything else we know about you and will hand over to the government whenever it presents us with a National Security Letter.

Quote:
Does Google share the information it collects from the Google Public DNS service with anyone else?
No.

No, not directly, it's much too valuable to us to give it to anyone else. We use it in all sorts of ways, though. And, of course, we'll give it to the Feds if they present us with a NSL.

Quote:
Is information about my queries to Google Public DNS shared with other Google properties, such as Search, Gmail, ads networks, etc.?
No.

No, not as such. We collect all of the information from all those sources and pool it in the Google Profile database. As such, we never share data between these services, it all goes into the central repository to be used as we see fit, or handed over to the Feds when requested.
post #67 of 91
Not sure if anyone has mentioned whether Akami uses allow-transfer {"none";}
in their master/cache only DNS or not.

If they do, then the original DNS query will always be forwarded to akami.com where the client IP would be used to geo locate them. The DNS server you have in you computer becomes somewhat irrelevant except for the forwarding latency. At least then you would let Akami decide which streaming server to use for your request.

It appears they do since when I dig them I get their authoritative DNS servers.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #68 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

And translations...



No, it's stored in your Google Profile, which is linked to your Google Account, along with everything else we know about you and will hand over to the government whenever it presents us with a National Security Letter.



No, not directly, it's much too valuable to us to give it to anyone else. We use it in all sorts of ways, though. And, of course, we'll give it to the Feds if they present us with a NSL.



No, not as such. We collect all of the information from all those sources and pool it in the Google Profile database. As such, we never share data between these services, it all goes into the central repository to be used as we see fit, or handed over to the Feds when requested.

Anything to back your statements?
post #69 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post

Anything to back your statements?

Any reason we shouldn't believe my translation?

Google has never been honest about what it does. They are a serial law breaker with no respect for intellectual property or privacy law. Even when they say they don't do something, it turns out they do, "inadvertently" of course.

Google, all evil, all the time.
post #70 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Any reason we shouldn't believe my translation?

Google has never been honest about what it does. They are a serial law breaker with no respect for intellectual property or privacy law. Even when they say they don't do something, it turns out they do, "inadvertently" of course.

Google, all evil, all the time.

Ah, yes, nothing to back it up except hate against a company. This or you are joking
post #71 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post

Ah, yes, nothing to back it up except hate against a company. This or you are joking

So, do you really believe Google doesn't collect and maintain detailed information on individuals?

We know they do. What isn't known for certain, outside Google, is exactly what's in these profiles. Given Google's extensive track record of dishonesty and criminal behavior, no one should trust any denials they make on the subject, especially when they are worded in such a way as to make the denials technically and very narrowly true, yet meaningless. You can go ahead and believe them, but you'll be wrong.
post #72 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

So, do you really believe Google doesn't collect and maintain detailed information on individuals?

We know they do. What isn't known for certain, outside Google, is exactly what's in these profiles. Given Google's extensive track record of dishonesty and criminal behavior, no one should trust any denials they make on the subject, especially when they are worded in such a way as to make the denials technically and very narrowly true, yet meaningless. You can go ahead and believe them, but you'll be wrong.

So you're not joking, you truly believe that they always lie and they are evil.

Ok, do you have your tin cap?
post #73 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post

So you're not joking, you truly believe that they always lie and they are evil.

Well, no, they don't always lie. When they said they were agreeing with Verizon to kill Net Neutrality, they were telling the truth. But, yes, they are evil.
post #74 of 91
End users reach Google DNS via anycast IP (8.8.x.x) . Specific Google Public DNS node which got lookup request either responds from it's cache, or queries authoritative servers. Queries are sent from non-anycast IP - see locations list here:

http://code.google.com/speed/public-...html#locations

Those IP ranges (same as others containing DNS nameservers) are mapped by CDNs to their own closest nodes. The granularity of such mapping would be likely be more precise when you use your own or your ISP DNS server (since so far Google operates Public DNS in only 16 locations, about half in US).
post #75 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by bettieblue View Post

Correct!!! DNS is a lookup, sure that initial lookup could take a milisecond longer if your local ISP DNS is closer in terms of latency.....but it also could NOT have the info you need and it would have to forward the request or hit a root server. In either case once you have the IP of the media streaming server, DNS is out of the picture.

Appleinsider ONCE AGAIN showing their NUT JOB bias. Google is a major threat to Apple, therefore and enemy of AI???

Loones run this blog.

Oh, come on, this is so easy to test that it's not worth arguing about. Nobody is talking about how long the DNS request takes. We care about the IP address it returns, because that's who we end up downloading data from.

I live in California.

Code:

$ nslookup appldnld.apple.com
Servert10.0.1.1
Addresst10.0.1.1#53
Nameta1271.di3.akamai.net
Address: 69.22.162.137 (GeoIP says this is in Concord, CA)

$ nslookup appldnld.apple.com 8.8.4.4
Servert8.8.4.4
Addresst8.8.4.4#53
Nameta1271.di3.akamai.net
Address: 96.17.8.49 (GeoIP says this is in Cambridge, MA)

(wait a few seconds)

$ nslookup appldnld.apple.com 8.8.4.4
Servert8.8.4.4
Addresst8.8.4.4#53
Nameta1271.di3.akamai.net
Address: 203.106.85.168 (GeoIP says this is in Malaysia)



If you use your ISP's DNS server, you're going to connect to a server close to you and get a fast download. If you use Google's DNS server, you might either get lucky and get a server 3000 miles away in Massachusetts, or unlucky and get an Akamai server that's 8500 miles away in Malaysia. Think you might see a drop in performance when going across the ocean unnecessarily? As mentioned before, GoogleDNS will tend to return the same result to many more, making these servers even more overloaded than they might normally be.

Or it could be a big conspiracy. I mean, who knows, you know?
post #76 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohai View Post

[...]Or it could be a big conspiracy. I mean, who knows, you know?

Since you bring it up, I think my downloads are slow because I have Comcast, and they're cock-blocking my AppleTV downloads. All other downloads work perfectly.
post #77 of 91

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Edited by MacRulez - 5/4/12 at 1:02pm
post #78 of 91

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Edited by MacRulez - 5/4/12 at 12:58pm
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Edited by MacRulez - 5/4/12 at 12:57pm
post #80 of 91

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Edited by MacRulez - 5/4/12 at 1:02pm
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