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Apple partners with Cherokee tribe to put language on iPhones

post #1 of 56
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Apple has partnered with a Native American tribe to develop Cherokee language software for the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad, in an effort to ensure the language is not forgotten.

Apple's work with the Cherokee tribe was highlighted in a profile published Wednesday by The Associated Press. The Cherokee people hope to spread the use of their language amongst tech-savvy children who use devices like the iPhone and iPad.

While software has already been developed for the iPhone and iPod touch, an iPad version of the application is also said to be in development. At the Cherokee Nation language immersion school in Tahlequah, Okla., teachers use the technology to text students in Cherokee after school to encourage use of the native tongue.

"Tribal officials first contacted Apple about getting Cherokee on the iPhone three years ago," the report said, adding: "After many discussions... the Cupertino, Calif.-based company surprised the tribe by coming through this fall."

Apple's legendary secrecy was even in place when it came to adding the Cherokee language to the iPhone. The tribe didn't learn that Apple had granted their request until right before iOS 4.1 was released in September.

Apple wouldn't comment on the matter, or say how much the development cost, but tribe officials claim that Cherokee is the only American Indian language supported by Apple devices.

The Cherokee language was developed in 1821 by a blacksmith named Sequoyah. The tribe is said to take particular pride in their alphabet, and obtained a printing press to publish the Cherokee Phoenix in 1828.

But today, only about 8,000 of the 290,000 Cherokee tribe members speak the language, and most of those who do are 50 or older. The tribe is concerned that their language could disappear.
post #2 of 56
That is just cool. This is one of the glimpses into how much Apple cares about how they affect the world around them and the impact they can make.
GIGO. The truth in all of life.
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GIGO. The truth in all of life.
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post #3 of 56
As a proud part Cherokee, who cannot speak the language; I congratulate Apple for taking the time and effort to contribute to preservation of the Cherokee language. My Cherokee ancestors left their tribe in Eastern TN in 1832 when trouble started brewing and moved west on their own. Thus, they avoided the first Cherokee removal to Arkansas and the later Trail of Tears removal to Oklahoma. The forced removal is a sad chapter in our Country's history.
post #4 of 56
I was unaware they had a written language. Nice to see it added to the digital world, maybe it will spread to heights unseen. Thanks to Apple for bringing it to the world at large.
post #5 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by technohermit View Post

I was unaware they had a written language. Nice to see it added to the digital world, maybe it will spread to heights unseen. Thanks to Apple for bringing it to the world at large.

It is interesting that it was developed by a blacksmith. Of course back then being a blacksmith would have been a high tech job.
post #6 of 56
It is a credit to Appleinsider that they have reported on this. No one else has bothered or at least I haven't seen any recent references.
post #7 of 56
"The forced removal is a sad chapter in our Country's history."

One of the saddest chapters.

Once in a very great while a huge corporation does something to make you proud of them. Apple deserves congratulations for this.
post #8 of 56
I read an article a couple of months ago regarding the addition of the Cherokee language to iOS. Surprised this is just catching on now.
Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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post #9 of 56
This is wonderful news and has great potential. Contests to everyone involved.
post #10 of 56
It was the writing system that was developed in 1821, not the language.
post #11 of 56
Very cool! Way to go Apple!

Best
post #12 of 56

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 5/4/12 at 12:54pm
post #13 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveling Apple View Post

As a proud part Cherokee, who cannot speak the language; I congratulate Apple for taking the time and effort to contribute to preservation of the Cherokee language. My Cherokee ancestors left their tribe in Eastern TN in 1832 when trouble started brewing and moved west on their own. Thus, they avoided the first Cherokee removal to Arkansas and the later Trail of Tears removal to Oklahoma. The forced removal is a sad chapter in our Country's history.

It seems reasonable to my understanding that this would be a great opportunity for you to learn your ancestral language and pass it on for generations to come, with extended linguistic tools that could now be made possible, due to this joint collaboration.
post #14 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by RjTor View Post

It was the writing system that was developed in 1821, not the language.

And technically written Cherokee is not an alphabet but a syllabary, but most people don't know the difference.
post #15 of 56
There is already a Klingon dictionary and translator, so I think a Cherokee language app is a good idea.
post #16 of 56
Preservation of world languages is a real conundrum. On the one hand, multiple languages present a barrier to communication and understanding. On the other hand, each language has the potential to express nuances of the human experience that are unique. I can imagine that languages could be preserved in the electronic version of world seed banks. But without being used in real life they are merely museum artifacts. Perhaps the only solution is that everyone needs to be bilingual: a universal world language such as English, and the local tongue of your own cultural roots.
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A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
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post #17 of 56
Next up.....a Navajo Code Talker App.


p.s. Mele Kalikimaka
post #18 of 56
Good for Apple. No doubt Google and Microsoft will suddenly have similar ideas
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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post #19 of 56
It's been a few years since they added support for the Hawaiian language (which was almost extincted back in the first half of the 20th century, but has rebounded since due to major educational efforts). I remember how excited I was about that, as a non-native non-speaker who lives in Hawaii, just because it meant I could finally type Hawaiian words with the correct accent marks!

Good to see them doing Cherokee too. Now for the Text Lens language pack, right?
post #20 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbh0001 View Post

And technically written Cherokee is not an alphabet but a syllabary, but most people don't know the difference.

Sequoyah did not create it "in 1821". He spent some 12 years developing it. If you think about it, even that is a pretty short time. He had to develop not merely the symbols, but the entire grammar, and it had to be good enough to make sense to others and be relatively easy to learn as well.

A remarkable achievement, at precisely the right time in order to help the tribe stay cohesive. One of those rare occasions where a single individual really does make a huge difference.
post #21 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbh0001 View Post

And technically written Cherokee is not an alphabet but a syllabary, but most people don't know the difference.

As is Japanese.
post #22 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post

That is just cool. This is one of the glimpses into how much Apple cares about how they affect the world around them and the impact they can make.

Barf.

Where is Apple's donation to Detroit or Newark, New jersey?
post #23 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

Next up.....a Navajo Code Talker App.

And Tom-Tom Ringtones! Will be interesting to see the final product. Good job Apple.

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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post #24 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

And Tom-Tom Ringtones! Will be interesting to see the final product. Good job Apple.

HOW White man!
post #25 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alonso Perez View Post

Sequoyah did not create it "in 1821". He spent some 12 years developing it. If you think about it, even that is a pretty short time. He had to develop not merely the symbols, but the entire grammar, and it had to be good enough to make sense to others and be relatively easy to learn as well.

A remarkable achievement, at precisely the right time in order to help the tribe stay cohesive. One of those rare occasions where a single individual really does make a huge difference.

Yeah, Sequoyah really had um TREED.
post #26 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

Barf.

Where is Apple's donation to Detroit or Newark, New jersey?

Right behind the donation I'm sure you made first.

To you, it's all about money, or you.

Kudos for Apple for making the effort on their own dime. But trolls like you just can't handle any positive news that involves Apple.

Go away.
post #27 of 56
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Originally Posted by Fast Fred 1 View Post

HOW White man!

This is how...

Paul Revere & The Raiders

Of course you gotta love Cher

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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post #28 of 56
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Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

Right behind the donation I'm sure you made first.

To you, it's all about money, or you.

Kudos for Apple for making the effort on their own dime. But trolls like you just can't handle any positive news that involves Apple.

Go away.

Sorry- not gonna happen.

I'm not a billionaire.

And you have just been added to my fanbot ignore list .
post #29 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

Sorry- not gonna happen.

I'm not a billionaire.

And you have just been added to my fanbot ignore list .

Ah, so because you "can't" donate, the people who can should be forced to. Gotcha.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #30 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Ah, so because you "can't" donate, the people who can should be forced to. Gotcha.

No, I can "donate" - but any donation I could make would be peanuts compared to a multi-million $ corporation's or billionaire's. Mark Zuckerberg's is an example. Comprendez? Not that difficult to comprehend.
post #31 of 56
Littebighorn do rain dance for crops.
post #32 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

No, I can "donate" - but

Drop the "but" and stop right there... "No, I can donate."

A lot of "little nothings" can add up to a "whole lot of something"! Your donation should not be looked upon as too meager, or "peanuts" as you said, to do any good. Every little bit helps. That may sound cliche but it's true!

My family, then I, have been sending a small donation to our Volunteer Fire Rescue Squad. It's usually in the amount of $25.00 to $50.00. We have been donating for the past 40 years when we had a kitchen fire in our house when I was little and, no I didn't start it, but the volunteer fire rescue squad came in our time of need. In appreciation, and by no request of them, we have been donating a little something ever since.

We have always been of simple means (not billionaires either), and I would think the rescue squad wouldn't expect our donation to fully support their operations for the year, but our donation added to the countless of other hundreds or thousands of donations help to keep them in business and available in our time of need, Heaven forbid, should we have to call upon them again.

We also donate to the American Cancer Society ever since my mother passed from cancer 15 years ago. Again, $25.00 bucks or so. Nothing that will solely support their means to discover the cure for cancer, but a little something added to other's and their gift, allow the Cancer Society to continue their research.

There are a couple of other charities due to circumstances that have effected mine and my families life, but I would like to maintain some anonymity here.

Again, every little bit helps and the only donation to an organization or charity that is not helpful, is the one that is not made.

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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post #33 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post

That is just cool. This is one of the glimpses into how much Apple cares about how they affect the world around them and the impact they can make.

maybe they (and other companies) should care enough to bring jobs back to the usa.

not just monkey work (aka as retail)


post #34 of 56
Pretty-sure it's called Tsalagi, not cherokee, which is the settlers' bastardization of "tsalagi" (those same settlers later got jobs on Ellis Island changing surnames of immigrants when they couldn't pronounce them).

Look again at the syllabary... see anything in that for the 'ch' sound?
post #35 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLoveStuff View Post

There is already a Klingon dictionary and translator, so I think a Cherokee language app is a good idea.

Quote:
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

Next up.....a Navajo Code Talker App.

I was thinking of both these things when I read the article! (except re Klingon coming before Cherokee I would've said "not only a good idea, but overdue."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

Preservation of world languages is a real conundrum. On the one hand, multiple languages present a barrier to communication and understanding. On the other hand, each language has the potential to express nuances of the human experience that are unique. I can imagine that languages could be preserved in the electronic version of world seed banks. But without being used in real life they are merely museum artifacts. Perhaps the only solution is that everyone needs to be bilingual: a universal world language such as English, and the local tongue of your own cultural roots.

Good point and worth discussing. I'll add that translation technology is going to make it easier for people to keep speaking their own tongues for one thing. That's not an unmixed blessing for it makes people dependent on tech to communicate at all. However, English (for multiple reasons I won't get into in a post) does seem poised to become (for the multi-lingual) nearly everyone's second language. (Which is cool for English speakers at least.)

Not all declining languages end up as relics. Basque (outlawed by the Spanish government for many years) has made a big comeback. Gaelic, tho' hardly as endangered as Cherokee, is also enjoying a large resurgence in Ireland.

And other tongues may yet make a resurgence. Certainly all are worth at least archiving if only in the interest of history and heritage.

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post

That is just cool. This is one of the glimpses into how much Apple cares about how they affect the world around them and the impact they can make.

What a sycophantic answer.

Apple is all over the place when it comes to 'doing the right thing'. Why, for example, did they recently pull the Wikileaks app? Was that doing the right thing? Or was it doing exactly what a morally bankrupt government wishes it to do?

Thinking differently, it seems, doesn't apply when it comes to whistleblowing.
post #37 of 56
Get real. There are more than 30,000 languages in the world. Should we keep them all alive or devote resources to other goals and have a single language to communicate? Get real.
post #38 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

Get real. There are more than 30,000 languages in the world. Should we keep them all alive or devote resources to other goals and have a single language to communicate? Get real.

Have one single language to comm-unicate? Sounds comm-unist (see what I did there? Heh).
post #39 of 56
Just looking around there is a Font for Cherokee:

http://www.cherokee.org/Culture/Cher...Downloads.aspx

Now I one thing I would be curious to know is the ISO language code used to identify the language in software.
post #40 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

Barf.

Where is Apple's donation to Detroit or Newark, New jersey?

I think they will start helping out cities like Detroit when they stop looting stores after lost or or won ballgames. You know, act like civilized people.



I am glad they did this and may in fact know one of the people involved on the Cherokee side getting this done. I am going to shoot him an email right now. There is another language among the Cherokee that is only spoken by one or two people now. There are others trying to get as much learned and recorded as possible but once the last die, it is gone forever. Language preservation could be a basic historical preservation more valuable than any fossil. Very nice move of Apple.
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Hard-Core.
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