or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Apple iPad sales slamming hard drive makers
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple iPad sales slamming hard drive makers

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
The outlook for hard drive manufacturers is getting jolted by the popularity of Apple's iPad as the market wakes up to the reality that a significant segment of personal computers will no longer user mechanical hard drives.

New earnings reports from both Western Digital and Seagate Technology specifically cite tablets as being a risk to future sales, according to a report published by TickerSpy.

Seagate noted, for example, that its fiscal second-quarter results "tumbled by 72 percent due to slack demand for hard drives," the report said.

Bleak outlook for hard drives caused Seagate's stock to slide 7 percent, Quantum lost 6 percent, Western Digital dropped by 5 percent, while the entire Data Storage Stock index was down 2.9 percent.

iPad sales blast through the PC roof

Apple sold more than 7.3 million iPads in the last quarter of 2010, for a total of more than 14.7 million in its first three quarters on the market. "The demand has just been amazing and this is off to an incredible start," Peter Oppeneheimer, Apple's chief financial offer, said in yesterday's quarterly earnings conference call.

When asked when iPad supply would be able to comfortably meet demand, Apple's chief operations officer Tim Cook answered, "we honestly don't know," indicating that the company itself has been surprised by its initial sales.

Cook said that iPad is not following the typical early adopter curve. "We want to take full advantage of it, and so we are investing enormous time and resources in increasing our capability in getting iPad out to as many people as we can," Cook said.

Hard drive sector problems on the rise

Because the iPad uses flash storage memory similar to the iPhone and iPod touch, it doesn't need to include a conventional mechanical hard drive. Apple began shifting its iPod user base toward flash-based models with the iPad nano, and accelerated the trend with the flagship iPod touch that now makes up half of all iPods sold.

But it's not just sales of new iPods and iPads that are the knocking against the future of component demand growth in hard drives. Conventional PC form factors, and in particular notebooks and netbooks, are being eaten up by iPad sales in increasing numbers, both by consumers and in corporate circles.

Apple's chief executive Steve Jobs previously described iPad demand as its being "grabbed out of our hands" by business users.

Apple's ecosystem makes its own rain

Because most conventional PC products use hard drives, the growth of iPad at their expense is both depressing hard drive demand and creating excess supply, an issue that threatens to shift production and investment away from hard drive technologies and toward flash RAM storage.

In the meantime, Apple also benefits from more favorable component pricing in its devices that continue to use hard drives, including iMacs and most MacBooks, which are differentiated enough from iPad to prevent a cannibalization problem.

PC market analysts have, so far, sought to ignore the iPad even while celebrating the rise of netbooks in previous years. Recent reports on the PC market by IDC and Gartner bent over backward to avoid uttering "iPad," instead using "media tablet" as a polite euphemism for a force they had to admit was making a huge impact on PC sales, even as they both refused to include iPads into their definition of the personal computer market.

IDC has specifically invented three new tablet "markets," one for eReaders, one for so called "media tablets," and a third for conventional Tablet PCs running Microsoft's Windows.

This allows the company to isolate Apple's top selling device and pretend that it isn't part of either the PC market or even a narrower general tablet market, when iPad is actually, and uncontroversially, causing major upheavals in the PC market and dominating tablets of all definitions, from expensive Tablet PCs to $130 eReader devices sold at discounters.



This all happened before

A similar problem has already emerged for DRAM makers, who are seeing the growth in netbooks and notebooks (which often pack 4 GB of DRAM) dry up as the iPad replaces them with a design that includes less than 512MB of DRAM.

Apple benefits both from cheaper RAM commodity prices on its machines that use large amounts of RAM, while also being able to offer iPad at a cheaper price point because it doesn't require as much RAM as most competing tablets and low end netbooks running Windows 7.

Following in the steps of iPad, Apple has already released popular MacBook Air models that replace a conventional hard drive with a flash RAM SSD (Solid State Disk) module. Apple appears set to migrate other Mac products to SSD as well.

Last year, Apple also redesigned its slow selling Apple TV to take on a new iOS form factor that uses flash RAM storage, no hard drive, costs much less and is smaller. Sales have increased significantly since.
post #2 of 40
Traditional hard drives are here not for long.

Which of us is the fisherman and which the trout?

Reply

Which of us is the fisherman and which the trout?

Reply
post #3 of 40
Once again drawing strangely unsupportable conclusions from disparate data. The iPad is not the only factor here.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #4 of 40
HDD's will still be here for those who need larger storage capacities in their computers. SSD's still don't have the larger capacities of HDD's and cost/GB is still hard to beat. The future for some may be in cloud computing resources for data storage.
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
post #5 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Povilas View Post

Traditional hard drives are here not for long.

3.5" drives will be around for a while in server farms. 2.5" drives however, are doomed to extinction.
post #6 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Povilas View Post

Traditional hard drives are here not for long.

Depends upon how you define long. Until SSD's can come close to matching HD prices, HD will be here. While Apple might do something stupid and eliminate HD storage from future MacBooks, other manufacturers won't take that course.

You can now get a name brand 2TB internal HD at physical retail for $125. A PNY SSD 128GB drive at physical retail is $255. 15x the storage at half the price. HDs will be around for awhile - 5 years is my guess.
post #7 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

Depends upon how you define long. Until SSD's can come close to matching HD prices, HD will be here. While Apple might do something stupid and eliminate HD storage from future MacBooks, other manufacturers won't take that course.

You can now get a name brand 2TB internal HD at physical retail for $125. A PNY SSD 128GB drive at physical retail is $255. 15x the storage at half the price. HDs will be around for awhile - 5 years is my guess.

I was thinking about something like 15 years. Consumer market that is.

Which of us is the fisherman and which the trout?

Reply

Which of us is the fisherman and which the trout?

Reply
post #8 of 40
Are none of these HDD makers also making SSDs?


Quote:
Originally Posted by OllieWallieWhiskers View Post

3.5" drives will be around for a while in server farms. 2.5" drives however, are doomed to extinction.

I think for 2.5" drives of the same size SSDs are now a larger capacity than HDDs, and have been so for a good year. I don't see HDDs catching up. The next die shrinkage should half the cost for the same capacity this year and if assume the same again 18-24 years later we could only be a few short years before SSD is the only viable solution for notebooks. I made the switch last year and wil never go back.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #9 of 40
So they need to up production to meet demand.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #10 of 40
What a joke. This is more down to SSDs incrementally replacing HDD. The ipad as a device is not responsible for this
post #11 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by OllieWallieWhiskers View Post

3.5" drives will be around for a while in server farms. 2.5" drives however, are doomed to extinction.

Interestingly, even the latest MBA represents "Macintosh HD" with the OS X hard drive icon. On the Air, the icon outlived the device.

(That realistic icon has always seemed a little strange, since non-geeks wouldn't know or care what a hard drive looks like. Floppy / CD / DVD icons make sense, since the user actually handles them.)
post #12 of 40
This can't happen fast enough as far as I'm concerned. SSD's have taken forever to get to a decent price point. I just priced one for my MBP and it's like $1400 from New Egg for a 512 GB. That's way too much, and I honestly need more space than that for photo and video. I hope these HD manufacturers see the writing on the wall and hurry up and drive the price down on these things.
post #13 of 40
SSDs will surely win out in the end but it's going to be years. I just ordered a new 3tb external USB 3 drive just this evening. Cost me £150. How much would 3tb of SSD cost me?

The economics don't make sense yet for anything other than ultra light use computing. Check back in 5 years.
post #14 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

will no longer user mechanical hard drives.

That's "use", not "user". Just sayin'.
post #15 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I think for 2.5" drives of the same size SSDs are now a larger capacity than HDDs, and have been so for a good year. I don't see HDDs catching up. The next die shrinkage should half the cost for the same capacity this year and if assume the same again 18-24 years later we could only be a few short years before SSD is the only viable solution for notebooks. I made the switch last year and wil never go back.

I think that HDD's still have a slight edge in storage capacity. 9.5mm SSD 480GB @ $1580.00, Seagate 750GB 7200rpm 9.5 about $120.00.

Bought a 17"ubMBP in 2009 with an Apple addition 256GB SSD still have room to spare and still fast. Would like to see TRIM in the next OS, but I think that we talked about this sometime ago. Eventually see MBP using the MBA solution of installing SSD options, however larger capacity drives are needed. Surprised that Apple didn't use the Toshiba 64GB chips which came out early 2010....guess cost and supply were a factor.
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
post #16 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Are none of these HDD makers also making SSDs?



I think for 2.5" drives of the same size SSDs are now a larger capacity than HDDs, and have been so for a good year. I don't see HDDs catching up. The next die shrinkage should half the cost for the same capacity this year and if assume the same again 18-24 years later we could only be a few short years before SSD is the only viable solution for notebooks. I made the switch last year and wil never go back.

I'm not aware of any off the HDD manufacturers making SSD's. SSD's is just chip making, and given the high cost to get into the high end of chip manufacturing, the barriers to entry are too high.

I agree with you about the cost scaling. If anything Flash scaling is going to go ahead of what we've seen from Moores law in other devices due to the remarkable competition going on between Samsung, Toshiba, Hynix and IMFT.

Having been given a laptop with an SSD when I started a new job six months ago, I really can see the end of HDD's in portable computers. Admittedly the SSD isn't as big as an HDD would be for the same cost, but it's big enough and the power and reliability benefits far outweigh the downsides.

I think eventually we'll probably see HDD's only in data centers, though I wouldn't like to hazard a guess on how long that will take.
post #17 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by OllieWallieWhiskers View Post

3.5" drives will be around for a while in server farms. 2.5" drives however, are doomed to extinction.

Except that servers have started to slowly move to 2.5" drives as well. At least in some situations, having three 2.5" drives instead of one 3.5" drive can consume less energy (and thus require less cooling).
post #18 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjw View Post

What a joke. This is more down to SSDs incrementally replacing HDD. The ipad as a device is not responsible for this

In as much as the iPad as replaced netbook purchases, and there is a lot of evidence that it has to some degree, the iPad replaced the sale of HDDs to netbook makers with the sale of flash memory to Apple.
post #19 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Are none of these HDD makers also making SSDs?

Nope.

There has been a lot of consolidation in the hard disk industry over the past decade and now there are only three companies making hard drives: Seagate, Hitachi, Western Digital.

None of them make SSDs to my knowledge.
post #20 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

I think that HDD's still have a slight edge in storage capacity. 9.5mm SSD 480GB @ $1580.00, Seagate 750GB 7200rpm 9.5 about $120.00.

Bought a 17"ubMBP in 2009 with an Apple addition 256GB SSD still have room to spare and still fast. Would like to see TRIM in the next OS, but I think that we talked about this sometime ago. Eventually see MBP using the MBA solution of installing SSD options, however larger capacity drives are needed. Surprised that Apple didn't use the Toshiba 64GB chips which came out early 2010....guess cost and supply were a factor.

Huh, 750GB HDD is the largest now. Somehow I missed that. I thought they still only went to 640GB in the 9.5mm height. I think Toshiba achieves this by putting 3, instead of 2, platters into the 9.5mm casing, not by increasing the amount of data per platter. Regardless of how they did it it’s an achievement.

The 512MB SSD images don’t look like they have a spacer so they are the 9.5mm height, not the 7mm height standard. I thought they were 7mm with the 2.5mm spacer, which is an unstated assumption of my initial assumption as going with a 7mm HDD seems to be maxing out at 320GB. That, too, may still be more than SSDs that are 7mm.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #21 of 40
Can you say hybrid drives with some flash built-in like the "Momentus XT", and similar?! The rest of the market is way behind Seagate, apparently...
post #22 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

Nope.

There has been a lot of consolidation in the hard disk industry over the past decade and now there are only three companies making hard drives: Seagate, Hitachi, Western Digital.

None of them make SSDs to my knowledge.

Hatachi@
http://www.hitachigst.com/solid-stat...rastar-ssd400s
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
post #23 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

Hatachi@
http://www.hitachigst.com/solid-stat...rastar-ssd400s

I think Hitachi's flash is being made by IMFT though.
post #24 of 40
I would be stunned if hard drive makers regard this as big news. If they do, they deserve to go down. Those that are worth their salt have already begun to shift business strategies. While it may be wrong to "blame" the iPad for this, the trend is one that Apple has clearly hastened with its Air line, iPods, and iPhones. The 'Pad is just the latest form factor in a long line. When changes come to this industry you shouldn't be surprised that Apple is deeply involved.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #25 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Povilas View Post

Traditional hard drives are here not for long.

For certain types of computer devices maybe, but who the heck could afford a 2 TB flash drive?. I'm not too familiar with manufacturing techniques of NAND, but I figure if enough effort was put into the production of NAND memory the price could be driven down quite a bit. Still, there's no need for a desktop to have only NAND memory. Use a hybrid drive with both spinning disks and NAND in one package. I've also heard that flash memory has a limited amount of write cycles (even with smart write algorithms) so any heavy-duty desktop computing might exceed those limits. I'm comfortable with the price/performance index of current hard drive technology, so I wouldn't be switching over any time soon. For a notebook, I'm ready to switch to flash memory even if it costs more.

Those Windows boys are going to be screwed having to run a bloated behemoth OS on expensive flash drives.
post #26 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Once again drawing strangely unsupportable conclusions from disparate data. The iPad is not the only factor here.

100% agree. This article and the lower results for HD makers was purely yet another opportunity for DED to spread his grand conspiracy theory about how all of the analyst firms are against giving Apple credit for the iPad single-handedly destroying the PC industry, which the entire last half of the article was about.

Even if you include the iPad in the personal computer market (which I would not, it's a new category just like those analysts are saying), it would account for I think about 10% of total sales. Please explain how that translates into 70+% lower results for HD makers?

Lower demand for PC's overall, regardless if the consumer purchased an iPad instead, likely has a bigger impact than the iPad alone does.
post #27 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

I'm not too familiar with manufacturing techniques of NAND, but I figure if enough effort was put into the production of NAND memory the price could be driven down quite a bit. Still, there's no need for a desktop to have only NAND memory.

There's probably more money being put into reducing the cost of NAND manufacturing than any other type of integrated circuit at the moment. Prices have fallen at an incredible pace, and they will continue to do so for the next few years.

I agree with your comments about there being no need for a desktop to have NAND at the moment, though I think that will change at some point as the price of NAND continues to drop.
post #28 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


PC market analysts have, so far, sought to ignore the iPad ...

...IDC and Gartner bent over backward to avoid uttering "iPad," ...

...they both refused to include iPads ...

This allows the company to isolate Apple ... and pretend ...



Wow. Is this for real?
post #29 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

Can you say hybrid drives with some flash built-in like the "Momentus XT", and similar?! The rest of the market is way behind Seagate, apparently...

Yup, a good compromise.
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
Reply
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
Reply
post #30 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

...and now there are only three companies making hard drives: Seagate, Hitachi, Western Digital.

Doesn't Samsung and Toshiba make hard drives too?

My first mac had a 500MB IBM IDE drive; every Mac I've owned since then came with a Toshiba hard drive.
post #31 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

Nope.
There has been a lot of consolidation in the hard disk industry over the past decade and now there are only three companies making hard drives: Seagate, Hitachi, Western Digital.
None of them make SSDs to my knowledge.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

Hatachi@
http://www.hitachigst.com/solid-stat...rastar-ssd400s
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

I think Hitachi's flash is being made by IMFT though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiA View Post

Doesn't Samsung and Toshiba make hard drives too?

My first mac had a 500MB IBM IDE drive; every Mac I've owned since then came with a Toshiba hard drive.

Toshiba makes both SSD's and HDD's and NAND chips.
http://sdd.toshiba.com/
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by stompy View Post

... Floppy / CD / DVD icons make sense, since the user actually handles them

What's a floppy?
A is A
Reply
A is A
Reply
post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Once again drawing strangely unsupportable conclusions from disparate data. The iPad is not the only factor here.

Actually I don't believe the iPad is a significant factor at all. If that was the case we would see a slide in Mac sales but instead are seeing a ramp up.

It reallly seems like the Windows hardware business is in a tail spin brought down by MicroSoft. Basically to many years of zero innovation, poor products and the nasty side effects of market manipulation. If there is one thing businesses can't stomach is having a partner like Microsoft constantly gumming up the works.

I would imagine that in a couple of years we might have a better idea of what is going on, but I suspect a big issue is that people are rejecting MS approach to computing. It isn't so much that Apple has a better product but rather that companies are being forced to give up MS tech because of it's troublesome nature.

So you have all these corporate IT guys looking for a way out and a shinny new iPad catches their eye. It isn't catching their eye because of the flash memory but rather because the are drowning in MS hell and this is just one of the life rafts they have to grab onto. So iPad sales soar as do Mac sales. Macs are seen as bigger more stable life rafts.
post #34 of 40
For me the iPad has actually led to the purchase of another two hard drives as using it with File Browser to stream HD movies from a 4TB NAS works wonderfully well. I don't think the causality is as clear cut as the author would like to make out to be.
post #35 of 40
Right now I don't think it is a huge factor in the sharp drop in PC sales. The trend was downward even before iPad debuted.

IPad2, when it gets here, may be a far bigger factor. If it fully disposes of it's current limitations it could be a very powerful platform to draw significantly from the PC sector. Especially Windows laptops. Apple needs to address CPU performance and installed RAM so that a wider array of apps run well or in some cases can run at all.

These are highly probable upgrades but Apple really needs to look at maxing out flash storage. Honestly I'd like to see them double flash at the low end and quadrupal flash stirage at the high end. It is not impossible especially at the high prices the charge for tiny incremental increases. This would make the iPads far better buys and really start to make PC users think twice. Do I really need that laptop considering what I use it for.
post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Actually I don't believe the iPad is a significant factor at all. If that was the case we would see a slide in Mac sales but instead are seeing a ramp up.

Not sure how you came t that conclusion... Not saying that I think iPad numbers have that great an influence either, but Apple doesn't really offer cheap computers (netbooks) that might get consumed by the iPad.

Also, those who're spouting the virtues of the huge capacity HDDs I think are missing the point. Most people (and if you're reading this, you're NOT most people) will not come close to consuming terabytes of data.

Yet MOST people would be able to tell the difference when using a SSD, the speed is unmistakably apparent and impressive. It makes a computer work like it should. F a s t . . . 256GB will happily contain MOST users for the next 5 years, and 256 is affordable now.
post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Santabean2000 View Post

Not sure how you came t that conclusion... Not saying that I think iPad numbers have that great an influence either, but Apple doesn't really offer cheap computers (netbooks) that might get consumed by the iPad.

Windows PC sales have fallen on very hard times, but I've yet to see any information that supports the idea that iPad was the cause of the slow up. A lot of assumptions have been made, but one reality is that Apple simply hasn't sold enough iPads to cause the huge drop in PC sales. I've also seen claims like iPad and even AIR sales are an indication that people don't need massive amounts of local storage, again I think this is another idea that gets twisted into being by people who assume that sales indicate peoples needs for all classes of PC use.

In this regard iPad is a different class of device which isn't directly comparable to netbooks, laptops nor even desktops. I just think it is a mistake to believe a new class of device is having a significant impact on PC sales when it has not impacted Mac sales at all. Or to put it another way PC sales would have seen a downturn with or without the existence of iPad.
Quote:
Also, those who're spouting the virtues of the huge capacity HDDs I think are missing the point. Most people (and if you're reading this, you're NOT most people) will not come close to consuming terabytes of data.

Actually I think you are wrong here. A lot of that is due to media files which the iPad actually encourages the storage of. Plus it flies in the face of what many service reps do for their bread and butter.

At least that is the impression I get from a friend that runs a little business fixing up computers. Even there I have to admit that part of the demand for all that disk space comes from people not knowing any better.

In any event we come back to my point that iPad or even the Touch is simply not indicative of peoples storage needs as primary storage for these machines is often else where. On top of that the rapid advancement in games and more serious apps is already crimping the ability of many users to configure their iPads as they please.

So yeah for most people iPads indicate nothing about their storage needs. It makes about as much sense as saying iPod Touch is indicative of peoples storage needs.
Quote:
Yet MOST people would be able to tell the difference when using a SSD, the speed is unmistakably apparent and impressive. It makes a computer work like it should. F a s t . . . 256GB will happily contain MOST users for the next 5 years, and 256 is affordable now.

I agree with everything but the idea that 256GB is enough above. It isn't even close for most users.

Let me relate my experience going to a brand new Mac Book Pro with a 200 GB disk in early 2008. This from previously being a Linux user. Before I downloaded one media file I was out of 60 GB of space. Install Open Office, Java, Eclipse, IWork, Aperture, XCode and a few other apps and you are suddenly missing a lot of disk space. When one then invests just a bit in iTunes your disk space demands sky rocket.

ITunes itself drives a lot of demand for disk space and I do believe that most people use it to some extent or another. In my case interest in just one series had me buying an external drive for ITunes. That doesn't include any other data files, reference materials nor source taking up space on my drive. Finally in talking to people I don't even believe that I represent most people because I regularly clean out my drives.

So back to my point, the iDevices indicate nothing about a persons storage needs. Further for many the AIR indicates nothing as it is often purchased as an adjunct to another computer. I just don't see how people can jump to the conclusions they do. Especially considering we have hardly touched upon the use of external storage devices.
post #38 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

It isn't so much that Apple has a better product but rather that companies are being forced to give up MS tech because of it's troublesome nature. ....

So you have all these corporate IT guys looking for a way out and a shinny new iPad catches their eye. It isn't catching their eye because of the flash memory but rather because the are drowning in MS hell and this is just one of the life rafts they have to grab onto. So iPad sales soar as do Mac sales...

I gotta hand it to you. Nobody, and I mean nobody, can "talk out of both sides of their mouth at the same time" ..... better than you. Your a riot, Alice ... a regular riot. ....
See, in the record business, you can show someone your song, and they don’t copy it. In the tech business, you show somebody your idea, and they steal it. (Jimmy Iovine)
Reply
See, in the record business, you can show someone your song, and they don’t copy it. In the tech business, you show somebody your idea, and they steal it. (Jimmy Iovine)
Reply
post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by OllieWallieWhiskers View Post

3.5" drives will be around for a while in server farms. 2.5" drives however, are doomed to extinction.

Hmm looks at brands new SAN and sees only 2.5inch SAS drives. Looks at brand new servers in rack, only sees 2.5inch SAS drives.

DED is a MORON. The iPad has had Zero impact on HD sales. SSD's have been climbing ever since they came out.
post #40 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Windows PC sales have fallen on very hard times, but I've yet to see any information that supports the idea that iPad was the cause of the slow up. A lot of assumptions have been made, but one reality is that Apple simply hasn't sold enough iPads to cause the huge drop in PC sales. I've also seen claims like iPad and even AIR sales are an indication that people don't need massive amounts of local storage, again I think this is another idea that gets twisted into being by people who assume that sales indicate peoples needs for all classes of PC use.

In this regard iPad is a different class of device which isn't directly comparable to netbooks, laptops nor even desktops. I just think it is a mistake to believe a new class of device is having a significant impact on PC sales when it has not impacted Mac sales at all. Or to put it another way PC sales would have seen a downturn with or without the existence of iPad.

Actually I think you are wrong here. A lot of that is due to media files which the iPad actually encourages the storage of. Plus it flies in the face of what many service reps do for their bread and butter.

At least that is the impression I get from a friend that runs a little business fixing up computers. Even there I have to admit that part of the demand for all that disk space comes from people not knowing any better.

In any event we come back to my point that iPad or even the Touch is simply not indicative of peoples storage needs as primary storage for these machines is often else where. On top of that the rapid advancement in games and more serious apps is already crimping the ability of many users to configure their iPads as they please.

So yeah for most people iPads indicate nothing about their storage needs. It makes about as much sense as saying iPod Touch is indicative of peoples storage needs.

I agree with everything but the idea that 256GB is enough above. It isn't even close for most users.

Let me relate my experience going to a brand new Mac Book Pro with a 200 GB disk in early 2008. This from previously being a Linux user. Before I downloaded one media file I was out of 60 GB of space. Install Open Office, Java, Eclipse, IWork, Aperture, XCode and a few other apps and you are suddenly missing a lot of disk space. When one then invests just a bit in iTunes your disk space demands sky rocket.

ITunes itself drives a lot of demand for disk space and I do believe that most people use it to some extent or another. In my case interest in just one series had me buying an external drive for ITunes. That doesn't include any other data files, reference materials nor source taking up space on my drive. Finally in talking to people I don't even believe that I represent most people because I regularly clean out my drives.

So back to my point, the iDevices indicate nothing about a persons storage needs. Further for many the AIR indicates nothing as it is often purchased as an adjunct to another computer. I just don't see how people can jump to the conclusions they do. Especially considering we have hardly touched upon the use of external storage devices.

"Windows PC sales have fallen on very hard times"

Really? Gartner predicted 12% growth for PC's in 2010 at the end of 2009. They grew 13.8%, and sold 350 million.

Just because you read a blog post from DED, does not mean has any truth in it.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPad
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Apple iPad sales slamming hard drive makers