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Adobe prepping "Creative Suite 5.5 Digital Publishing” for iOS, Android development

post #1 of 66
Thread Starter 
Adobe appears poised to rush to market a new bundle of Creative Suite applications ahead of CS6 that it hopes will solidify its Flash and Air technology as an alternative platform for developers looking to capitalize on the booming market for iOS and Android-based cell phone and tablet applications.

The new suite, which will reportedly be marketed as "Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Digital Publishing" suite, will showcase a new version of its "Packager for iPhone" application that will include support for not only Apple's iPhone, but also the iPad and the new crop of Android tablets, incorporating popular touch gestures like "Pinch."

As it stands, Packager for iPhone is a feature of Adobe Flash Professional CS5 software and the Adobe AIR SDK 2.0.1, which offers Flash developers a fast and efficient method to port existing code from ActionScript 3 projects to deliver native applications on iOS devices.

AppleInsider can independently corroborate claims that Adobe is feverishly working on a high profile CS 5.5 bundle that will land ahead of CS 6.0. While researching the features of Adobe Creative Suite 6.0 (1, 2) that were published last week, people familiar with Adobe's plans provided evidence of the aforementioned "Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Digital Publishing" suite by noting that the software maker had recently begun beta testing Adobe Flash Professional 5.5.

The new version of the Flash development application, which can be seen in the screenshot below, will reportedly usher in the new version of Adobe's "Packager for iPhone" tool. It's also expected to be accompanied by Adobe Flash Catalyst CS 5.5, which documentation describes as an "interaction design tool" for development teams that will deliver new features such as robust team workflows, live application design, full designer participation in development workflow, and deployment for web, desktop and mobile devices.

A screenshot of Adobe Flash Professional CS 5.5 build 11.5.0.260 | Source: AppleInsider

The CS 5.5 Digital Publishing suite will also reportedly support the ePub (or electronic publishing) 3.0 standard in InDesign 5.5 while bundling updates to other popular CS apps such as Dreamweaver, which is similarly expected to offer direct export of digital content.

It's believed that Adobe began work on CS 5.5 Digital Publishing suite in earnest after a bitter feud between Apple and Adobe ended in September with the iPhone maker overturning a ban that had previously prevented intermediary development tools like Flash from serving as an alternative to its iOS SDK as a development platform for its mobile devices.

The change came just weeks after evidence surfaced that the U.S. Federal Trade Commission was looking into a complaint filed by Adobe over Apple's all-inclusive banning of Flash from its iOS devices.
post #2 of 66
and let the Adobe bashing start... now:
post #3 of 66
About as exciting as a new version of Office. Some tools we need but we don't really want. More bloatware shoved at us with little concern for performance or stability IMHO.
post #4 of 66
I actually love Adobe products. PS and AE the most.

What I don't understand is flash.

I recently bought a Macbook Pro to act as the mobility my Mac Pro lacks. It's a wonderful little machine but when flash is running (in chrome, safari or firefox) it becomes almost unusable. It's horrible. I won't even get into battery life.

I'm not a programmer. I'm a bit of a tech-geek. I love Apple but love lots of different tech companies...

Can someone explain to me why it's better for us, users, to see the continued existence of Flash?

I just don't get it.
post #5 of 66
Is this an attempt to get Adobe's product look a bit more Mac-like or is it just some sort of skin or theme installed on a Windoze box or Parallels/VMware?

P.S. Is that Sears Flash or REAL Flash? - my apologies in advance to any offended Zappa fan (Camarillo Brillo). I know for a fact that it is not a real poncho
post #6 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by allmypeople View Post

Can someone explain to me why it's better for us, users, to see the continued existence of Flash?

It's not. It's only better for lazy web developers and Adobe.
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post #7 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Adobe appears poised to rush to market a new bundle of Creative Suite applications ahead of CS6 that it hopes will solidify its Flash and Air technology as an alternative platform for developers looking to capitalize on the booming market for iOS and Android-based cell phone and tablet applications. ...

Am I the only one that can't even keep track of Adobe's product portfolio anymore? They have so many irons in the fire it's hard to know what all the things they make even do or which tool to pick for a particular job.
post #8 of 66
I am happy Adobe are working hard, however I wish Apple would release some products for web designer development with the ease of iWeb and Pages that created HTML5 compliant code that output full browser and iOS versions. How about a new iWeb Pro?
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post #9 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Am I the only one that can't even keep track of Adobe's product portfolio anymore? They have so many irons in the fire it's hard to know what all the things they make even do or which tool to pick for a particular job.

I'd agree, just scanning through everything I have from Adobe I use one app on a regular bases, the rest I either only need rarely or for accepting files from others or I simply haven't had time to learn them. I don't think I'll be upgrading anymore other than for Photoshop.
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post #10 of 66
When is Adobe going to release Dreamweaver for iPad? There are no WYSIWYG web design platforms on iPad that I know of. This seems to be a big opportunity.

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post #11 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by allmypeople View Post

I actually love Adobe products. PS and AE the most.

What I don't understand is flash.

I recently bought a Macbook Pro to act as the mobility my Mac Pro lacks. It's a wonderful little machine but when flash is running (in chrome, safari or firefox) it becomes almost unusable. It's horrible. I won't even get into battery life.

I'm not a programmer. I'm a bit of a tech-geek. I love Apple but love lots of different tech companies...

Can someone explain to me why it's better for us, users, to see the continued existence of Flash?

I just don't get it.

You probably already have but if not install clicktoflash. It is a lifesaver for MBPs. I also use Little Snitch and deny tons of connections from web sites (e.g. Time) to connect to sites associated with macromedia sites (weird eh?).
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post #12 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Habañero View Post

and let the Adobe bashing start... now:

I don't blame Adobe for releasing the tools.

Let the bashing of developers who think they are going to rush cheap and ugly flash ports into the iOS store begin.

Or let the bashing of developers whining in public when their crap apps are rejected by Apple begin.

That's why I thought the way Apple lifted the ban was brilliant. They shifted the focus to what matters - "we don't care what tools you use to produce iOS apps, they just can't suck!"

Let the games begin!
post #13 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by allmypeople View Post

I'm not a programmer. I'm a bit of a tech-geek. I love Apple but love lots of different tech companies...

Can someone explain to me why it's better for us, users, to see the continued existence of Flash?

I just don't get it.

I just don't get why people complain so much about Flash. For end users, it provides an unmatched combination of animation, vector graphics and interactivity that simply is not available via a single alternative method. It is supported by the vast majority of web browsers in use today, which means that if you view Flash content in Safari on OS X, it will look identical to Firefox on Windows. This is not possible with HTML, as it's down to the browser and the operating system to determine how things like fonts are rendered.

Something that is often overlooked by the Apple Flash hate gang is the complexity of implementing animation and graphics in HTML5's canvas compared to Flash. Flash as an authoring tool is perfect for designers and allows them to easily implement animations - place the objects on the screen and use the timeline to animate freely.

In HTML5, you need to write code to do this. In general (and in many organisations), artists can't write code and coders can't create good looking artwork or animations. It's therefore not possible for a great Flash designer to transition to using HTML5 unless a company comes along and creates a new piece of software that can output HTML code from a timeline-based designer.
post #14 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

I just don't get why people complain so much about Flash.

The only good Flash experience is on Windows.

That's and lots of annoying web sites are done in flash because of many of the "easy" things you point out, but to be fair a lack of taste or common sense isn't really Adobe's problem.

But the sucky performance of Flash on anything but Windows is. I think Adobe got lazy and figured Windows would be the top dog forever and it's now biting them in the ass big time.
post #15 of 66
You Flash bashers just don't seem to get the big picture!

Mobile platforms need developers in big numbers and as loyal as the IOS developers.
IOS has about 150K+ developers now. Flash has 5 Million, yes 5 MILLION developers (OK pseudo-developers). Now, think ahead for a minute, think business and outside of the little "I-hate-bloated -Flash world you live in. If an IDE that has 5 million loyal users can be re-tooled and leveraged to develop for the mobile environment, it is pure Gold, a license to print money. Wether you like it or not, its business as usual and it will succeed with Google, Motorola and Intel behind Adobe. Apple loosened the license for a reason. Do you think it was that they were afraid of another lawsuit? They are smart enough to not be left out in the cold when the Flash development tidal wave happens.
The new Flash Player shown at Adobe MAX was incredible, so, you will be able to get rid of ClicktoCrash in the near future. Wiseup, Flash will be bigger than it ever was before. It is naive not to believe this.
post #16 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

...In HTML5, you need to write code to do this. In general (and in many organisations), artists can't write code and coders can't create good looking artwork or animations. It's therefore not possible for a great Flash designer to transition to using HTML5 unless a company comes along and creates a new piece of software that can output HTML code from a timeline-based designer.

Sounds like a business opportunity!

I have been avoiding creating flash artwork ever since I started doing a healthy proportion of my web browsing on iPhones & iPads. RIgnoring the politics of it, with IE9 approaching, HTML5 with the Canvas element is the true cross-browser, cross platform technique. Fonts can now be used as well via several methods.

I'm not a Flash hater (and certainly not an Adobe hater! Long Live InDesign, Illustrator & Photoshop!!!), but I certainly would prefer an alternative development environment that spit out code to make Flash-type content work in a Canvas element.

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post #17 of 66
Apple will release one before Adobe would.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

When is Adobe going to release Dreamweaver for iPad? There are no WYSIWYG web design platforms on iPad that I know of. This seems to be a big opportunity.
post #18 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraBuggy View Post

You Flash bashers just don't seem to get the big picture!

Mobile platforms need developers in big numbers and as loyal as the IOS developers.
IOS has about 150K+ developers now. Flash has 5 Million, yes 5 MILLION developers (OK pseudo-developers). Now, think ahead for a minute, think business and outside of the little "I-hate-bloated -Flash world you live in. If an IDE that has 5 million loyal users can be re-tooled and leveraged to develop for the mobile environment, it is pure Gold, a license to print money. Wether you like it or not, its business as usual and it will succeed with Google, Motorola and Intel behind Adobe. Apple loosened the license for a reason. Do you think it was that they were afraid of another lawsuit? They are smart enough to not be left out in the cold when the Flash development tidal wave happens.
The new Flash Player shown at Adobe MAX was incredible, so, you will be able to get rid of ClicktoCrash in the near future. Wiseup, Flash will be bigger than it ever was before. It is naive not to believe this.

You may be right. Flash could become relevant again if it cleans up its act.

I do question your thinking in characterizing the developers being in the driver's seat. This is partly where Microsoft started driving into the ditch. Isn't there a video out there of Ballmer at a conference jumping up and down screaming 'Developers' at the top of his lungs? Thought I remembered seeing that once. Anyway, my point is that Apple's success of late has come from putting the end-user in the driver's seat. These days a developer who refuses to work in IOS is going to lose customers. Business organizations are suggestion that business owners avoid proprietary web technologies and stick with web standards when building their webs presence. I submit that the company that makes the best HTML5, Javascript & CSS authoring environment will win over the successful developers of the future (IE: the developers who's work performs on ALL platforms). Right now that means Flash is not in the running.

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post #19 of 66
You can already export to ePub format from InDesign. This information isn't quite up to speed.

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post #20 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I am happy Adobe are working hard, however I wish Apple would release some products for web designer development with the ease of iWeb and Pages that created HTML5 compliant code that output full browser and iOS versions. How about a new iWeb Pro?

Man I totally agree. I've been saying that for a couple years now.

Why doesn't Apple make iWeb Pro? That could be awesome!!!
post #21 of 66
It will be interesting to see what Adobe charges for 5.5

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post #22 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Realistic View Post

It will be interesting to see what Adobe charges for 5.5

This is what I would like to know.
post #23 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by polymnia View Post

You may be right. Flash could become relevant again if it cleans up its act.

I do question your thinking in characterizing the developers being in the driver's seat. This is partly where Microsoft started driving into the ditch. Isn't there a video out there of Ballmer at a conference jumping up and down screaming 'Developers' at the top of his lungs? Thought I remembered seeing that once. Anyway, my point is that Apple's success of late has come from putting the end-user in the driver's seat. These days a developer who refuses to work in IOS is going to lose customers. Business organizations are suggestion that business owners avoid proprietary web technologies and stick with web standards when building their webs presence. I submit that the company that makes the best HTML5, Javascript & CSS authoring environment will win over the successful developers of the future (IE: the developers who's work performs on ALL platforms). Right now that means Flash is not in the running.

You are correct about using web standards and the Flash player disappearing from browsers; however, the Flash IDE is the Goldmine, Adobe had already shown "Mashable" an app that converts swfs to HTML 5, Adobe is headed in the right direction, HTML 5 is the next step but still far far away from being a standard. The Flash IDE is a fantastic tool that happens to spit out swf files, that will change. Steve Jobs has always been developer driven, never customer driven, he knows great products will bring customers, he qoutes Henry Ford as asking customers what the want only to find they wanted a better buggy.
post #24 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraBuggy View Post

You are correct about using web standards and the Flash player disappearing from browsers; however, the Flash IDE is the Goldmine, Adobe had already shown "Mashable" an app that converts swfs to HTML 5, Adobe is headed in the right direction, HTML 5 is the next step but still far far away from being a standard. The Flash IDE is a fantastic tool that happens to spit out swf files, that will change. Steve Jobs has always been developer driven, never customer driven, he knows great products will bring customers, he qoutes Henry Ford as asking customers what the want only to find they wanted a better buggy.

I agree that Flash is a great authoring environment even though I don't really use it anymore. If they can retool it to spit out more modern code they may have a winner on their hands. I do wonder if the time that has been wasted by Adobe not fully embracing the new standards may have opened the door enough for a new software developer to create a competing authoring environment.

I don't agree about Steve Jobs being developer-driven. If the developers were in charge we would never have gotten Mac OSX. They had to be dragged kicking & screaming though many changes to the Mac platform. Just because Steve doesn't ask what anyone wants doesn't mean he doesn't have his customer's needs in mind. His unique gift is to be able to synthesize what his customers needs are without focus groups and carefully sculpt a product that pares away all unnecessary cruft. If anything Steve is Design-Driven. He knows customers will love what he creates (and they do, amazingly almost every time!) and that developers will come around eventually whether they were on board from the start or not (and he has been fortunate enough to win almost every game of chicken he's ever played with developers).

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post #25 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by polymnia View Post

I'm not a Flash hater (and certainly not an Adobe hater! Long Live InDesign, Illustrator & Photoshop!!!), but I certainly would prefer an alternative development environment that spit out code to make Flash-type content work in a Canvas element.

I don't get what Apple's idea for <canvas> is. It doesn't work very well, especially as a Flash replacement. Besides animation on a web page is so passé.

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post #26 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I don't get what Apple's idea for <canvas> is. It doesn't work very well, especially as a Flash replacement. Besides animation on a web page is so passé.

I'll be the first to admit that I don't know how to use it at all right now. I have seen other people's work that is quite impressive, though. I hope that authoring tools will become available that will make it possible for people like me to use Canvas where I might have previously used Flash.

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post #27 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

suite by noting that the software maker had recently begun beta testing Adobe Flash Professional 5.5.

Considering that I'm currently using Flash Professional version 11 this seems to be a misprint.

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post #28 of 66
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post #29 of 66
The iPhone Packager was updated to work on iPad’s in June 2010. Apple was blocking apps made with Adobe’s iPhone packager at that point, but I imagine the work had already been done so they added that to the update.

Just go to Adobe’s Flash CS5 download page and the first update mentions that it includes iPad support.

Also the iPhone Packager always (at least the release version, I don't know about the private alpha & beta) supported multitouch including the pinch to zoom.

That said, the iPhone Packager is fallen behind the Android support which supports AIR 2.5 API compared to the iPhone Packager that supports just AIR 2.0. This was the result of Adobe stopping development on the iPhone Packager after Apple started blocking Flash apps. So an update to the iPhone Packager to get it in alignment with AIR for Android is likely in the works, but the rest of this rumor seems to be way, way off.
post #30 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

...
2. HTML5 and its canvas object offer no significant performance advantage, if any at all.
Look around on the web. There are plenty of Flash vs. Canvas comparisons out there, and what they show is unsurprising: if you tax your CPU with computationally intensive operations, it eats power and clock cycles.
...

There is one difference: When Adobe makes a crappy Flash player for Mac OS, Linux, Windows or anyone else they don't have much to worry about. No one else makes a Flash player.

If Mozilla makes a version of Firefox that poorly renders Canvas & Javascript animations, perhaps Google will build better functionality into Chrome which will force Mozilla to make a better player.
Competition is the key to improving performance. Notice how much better Javascript execution has gotten since it became a marketing point to promote various browsers?

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post #31 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by polymnia View Post

I agree that Flash is a great authoring environment even though I don't really use it anymore. If they can retool it to spit out more modern code they may have a winner on their hands. I do wonder if the time that has been wasted by Adobe not fully embracing the new standards may have opened the door enough for a new software developer to create a competing authoring environment.

I don't agree about Steve Jobs being developer-driven. If the developers were in charge we would never have gotten Mac OSX. They had to be dragged kicking & screaming though many changes to the Mac platform. Just because Steve doesn't ask what anyone wants doesn't mean he doesn't have his customer's needs in mind. His unique gift is to be able to synthesize what his customers needs are without focus groups and carefully sculpt a product that pares away all unnecessary cruft. If anything Steve is Design-Driven. He knows customers will love what he creates (and they do, amazingly almost every time!) and that developers will come around eventually whether they were on board from the start or not (and he has been fortunate enough to win almost every game of chicken he's ever played with developers).

It would be difficult for a competing authoring environment to Adobe. The great workflow and round-tripping between Photoshop, Premiere, Flash, InDesign...etc would be hard to beat. I'm sure their tools will export to web standards when HTML 5 actually becomes a standard.

Yes, I agree, Steve is design driven more than customer or developer driven.
post #32 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by allmypeople View Post

What I don't understand is flash.

I recently bought a Macbook Pro to act as the mobility my Mac Pro lacks. It's a wonderful little machine but when flash is running (in chrome, safari or firefox) it becomes almost unusable. It's horrible. I won't even get into battery life.

I can notice a CPU and a browser hit when downloading a huge zip file on my MBP. Same thing can happen with Flash. If it involves a huge download like a movie, it can definitely slow down other functions, especially trying to browse in another window at the same time. That huge download has to spool to the drive and uses a lot of ram doing so. Spinning the drive and the heat from the CPU, ram and spinning the fans can eat into battery life as well.

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post #33 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraBuggy View Post

It would be difficult for a competing authoring environment to Adobe. The great workflow and round-tripping between Photoshop, Premiere, Flash, InDesign...etc would be hard to beat. I'm sure their tools will export to web standards when HTML 5 actually becomes a standard.

Yes, I agree, Steve is design driven more than customer or developer driven.

I certainly agree that the round-tripping in Adobe's Creative Suite is, well, sweet! Still, there as a big gaping hole in their web development software. I'm finding that Dreamweaver isn't well suited to how I work in a Content Management System. I generally just style my HTML using FireBug & a CSS text file. What I could really use is Adobe's industrial-strength tools for animations and other Flash-y stuff...but if they won't work in IOS its a no-go. I use IOS compatibility as a selling point with my customers.

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post #34 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraBuggy View Post

You Flash bashers just don't seem to get the big picture!

Mobile platforms need developers in big numbers and as loyal as the IOS developers.
IOS has about 150K+ developers now. Flash has 5 Million, yes 5 MILLION developers (OK pseudo-developers). Now, think ahead for a minute, think business and outside of the little "I-hate-bloated -Flash world you live in. If an IDE that has 5 million loyal users can be re-tooled and leveraged to develop for the mobile environment, it is pure Gold, a license to print money. Wether you like it or not, its business as usual and it will succeed with Google, Motorola and Intel behind Adobe. Apple loosened the license for a reason. Do you think it was that they were afraid of another lawsuit? They are smart enough to not be left out in the cold when the Flash development tidal wave happens.
The new Flash Player shown at Adobe MAX was incredible, so, you will be able to get rid of ClicktoCrash in the near future. Wiseup, Flash will be bigger than it ever was before. It is naive not to believe this.

This is silly.

1. Even without 5 million Flash developers, iOS has far more apps (and vastly greater revenues) than any other platform. They're doing just fine without Flash.

2. Adobe has had years to retool their IDE for mobile devices - and has failed miserably. After about 4 years of effort, they've managed to get it to limp along on a tiny percentage of the most powerful devices out there - at the expense of battery life - and choppy videos. If Adobe hasn't fixed it yet, what makes you think they're going to fix it now?

3. Adobe is regularly pretending to have some amazing Flash player. Unfortunately, the magic one in their demos never makes it out into the real world.
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post #35 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraBuggy View Post

ClicktoCrash in the near future. Wiseup

If Adobe has wised up, I think most people would be happy to get rid of Click to Flash.

The ball is in Adobe's court. I hope you are right and Adobe has taken this to heart and Flash does improve since, as you point out, it could be a valuable tool.

Today it isn't and that's the backlash and why things like Click to Flash exist. It's not because of some irrational hatred of Flash, but because of Flash's sucky performance and tendency to perpetuate what is perceived as "low quality" content.
post #36 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

This is silly.

1. Even without 5 million Flash developers, iOS has far more apps (and vastly greater revenues) than any other platform. They're doing just fine without Flash.

2. Adobe has had years to retool their IDE for mobile devices - and has failed miserably. After about 4 years of effort, they've managed to get it to limp along on a tiny percentage of the most powerful devices out there - at the expense of battery life - and choppy videos. If Adobe hasn't fixed it yet, what makes you think they're going to fix it now?

3. Adobe is regularly pretending to have some amazing Flash player. Unfortunately, the magic one in their demos never makes it out into the real world.

Obviously you are not understanding......Flash Player is out of the picture in what we are currently talking about.....Adobe has an iPhone Packager to create NATIVE IOS based apps.....not Flash running on the iPhone......its the Flash IDE, which is an outstanding development environment, exporting IOS based apps. Furthermore, this is not about Apple doing fine without Flash, its about all the other guys utilizing the Flash developers in an IDE that can export native mobile apps and web compliant standards.....NOT swf files for the Flash player. It makes perfect business sense to steer such an installed base of developers to standard models.
post #37 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post

If Adobe has wised up, I think most people would be happy to get rid of Click to Flash.

The ball is in Adobe's court. I hope you are right and Adobe has taken this to heart and Flash does improve since, as you point out, it could be a valuable tool.

Today it isn't and that's the backlash and why things like Click to Flash exist. It's not because of some irrational hatred of Flash, but because of Flash's sucky performance and tendency to perpetuate what is perceived as "low quality" content.

You are correct; however, I agree, swf files running in the Flash player is currently terrible, yet, The Flash IDE is fantastic and if it exported mobile apps and web compliant files such as HTML 5, immediately, 5 million developers are on hand to create content. This is what Google, Motorola are after. All this WITHOUT the Flash player which is the root of the problem for Flash haters.
post #38 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by polymnia View Post

I certainly agree that the round-tripping in Adobe's Creative Suite is, well, sweet! Still, there as a big gaping hole in their web development software. I'm finding that Dreamweaver isn't well suited to how I work in a Content Management System. I generally just style my HTML using FireBug & a CSS text file. What I could really use is Adobe's industrial-strength tools for animations and other Flash-y stuff...but if they won't work in IOS its a no-go. I use IOS compatibility as a selling point with my customers.

True, although, remember, Adobe has an "iPhone Packager" in Flash CS5 Pro that allows you to export NATIVE IOS based apps WITHOUT the need of a Flash player. There are already many apps on the app store created in Flash.
post #39 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraBuggy View Post

True, although, remember, Adobe has an "iPhone Packager" in Flash CS5 Pro that allows you to export NATIVE IOS based apps WITHOUT the need of a Flash player. There are already many apps on the app store created in Flash.

That's a good start, however, I don't design IOS Apps. I design websites. I'd love to use some Flash-y bits from time to time, but I can't show my customers a missing plugin icon when I demo their site on an iPad and I'm certainly not building multiple versions of my content. My niche is small business customers who don't have the budget for building elaborate workarounds for a little extra Flash. I've swallowed the pill that says 'author once, display anywhere' and if that means there are some types of content I don't offer until the tools catch up, so be it.

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post #40 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by polymnia View Post

I'd love to use some Flash-y bits from time to time, but I can't show my customers a missing plugin icon when I demo their site on an iPad and I'm certainly not building multiple versions of my content.

You don't have to worry about that. There is no broken icon now. They did away with it. Now it just shows an empty space. It really isn't that hard to target specific <div> tags with alternate content even if it is just a static image instead of an animation. The time consuming part is if the Flash you need to use is really interactive, that takes a lot of effort to reproduce using iOS friendly code.

Quote:
Originally Posted by polymnia View Post

I've swallowed the pill that says 'author once, display anywhere' and if that means there are some types of content I don't offer until the tools catch up, so be it.

Not always practical because on an iPhone the buttons need to be larger and not so close together to be sized for fingers. On a desktop having links so big looks ugly. At the very least you should be considering conditional CSS with either user agent or media queries to reformat styles

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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