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Netgear CEO rails on Apple's Steve Jobs, praises Android - Page 3

post #81 of 226
This statement says it all

Quote:
When asked if he had communicated his concerns to Jobs, Lo replied: "Steve Jobs doesn't give me a minute!"

Not sure why any of you need to analysis any further....
post #82 of 226
If I were a Netgear employee I would be embarrassed. The man obviously doesn't know why Flash is banned. He looks like an ass-clown trying call attention to himself.
post #83 of 226
deleted
post #84 of 226
Linux is quite successful as a part of price sensitive gear. E.g. my PVR runs a Linux inside. Maybe consumer routers run Linux inside. Now, my personal experience wit those products (and I think I owned a Netgear router once too) is generally not very good.

Take my PVR which runs a Linux inside: broken file system support for accented characters, broken EXT2/3 support, lame FTP server and much more. Support/updates: almost never. Open? I can't fix the bugs, the system is very closed. It is connected to my LAN and via my router/firewall to the internet and it will (like all its brethren) possibly be a major attack vector for malware in the foreseeable future when more and more of such embedded systems (TV, BD players, PVRs, etc) go online with a cheapskate and hardly supported Linux at its core. You just wait until you are going to visit web sites on your TV with embedded Linux.

All these millions and millions Embedded Linux based installations are in fact far from open. Generally, they are as closed as their makers can make them. The user generally doesn't even know there is Linux inside.

The type of installation where Linux seems most successful are closed Linux installations. Ironic, isn't it?
post #85 of 226

Ok so Steve is proud of his iPad iPhone etc and OS 4.
Lets not forget without Apple we would still be using push button clunky mobiles if it was not for apple companies like Nokia etc do not think what does the customer want when they designed a phone.
As for tablets well we would all be using rubbish notebooks running that blue screen baby.
Android is a knee jerk reaction copy of Apples innovation.
As fo Lo well he's Netgear need I say more
post #86 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

As in very much? As in, Safari is based on a Linux Web Browser?
Mac OS X being Open, as is stated on the Apple Website (though, however, not Open Source), I'd call BS on your comment.

A "Linux" web browser? What's that?
Does that mean Safari is now a "Unix and Windows web browser?"
While I would agree that Linux is successful in it way, your reasoning is bizarre.
post #87 of 226
"According to Lo, the iTunes distribution model amounts to Jobs effectively extorting content providers such as the movie studios by charging a "ransom" for content. "Steve Jobs wants to suffocate the distribution so even though he doesn't own the content he could basically demand a ransom," he said."

That's like saying the grocery store is charging a ransom for my Grape Nuts.
post #88 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

Content also matters. Apple is holding content holders to ransom. Thats the case.

That's b.s. No content holder is forced to distribute via the Apple Store. And I can take any audio I have (such as CDs) and upload them to iTunes and download them back to my iPhone. I don't see what's closed about this. In fact, 99% of my iPhone content came from CDs. The only thing that is closed is that you can't directly connect an iPod/iPhone to a different store.

The fact is that (at least in terms of audio), there are only four major labels: Sony/BMG, Warner, EMI and Universal. If they're really so upset with Apple and resent their model, only one has to pull out.

Similarly, in the movie industry, there are really only six majors: Warner, Paramount, 20thC Fox, Sony (Columbia), Universal and Disney/Touchstone. If any one (or perhaps two) of those pull out, it could cripple the Apple store and Apple would be forced to change their model. But they haven't pulled out, because the Apple store actually works quite well for them.

And as far as NetGear is concerned, for the longest time, I had terrible problems with my connection and I constantly placed blame on my ISP because I couldn't believe the problem was the router. At one point, I even thought it was my Mac. But I replaced the wireless router with the Apple AirPort Express and have never looked back. It works perfectly. I also happen to own a Sony Blu-ray player that has WiFi built in for streaming content. I read all these reports online about people who can't get the streaming working properly. But with my Apple AirPort Express, there's never a problem. Installed and continues to work flawlessly.
post #89 of 226
Netgear has officially changed its name to Netfear.

This is sad ... he says Apple will eventually fail. Right ... can someone please alert Netgear CEO that his shuttle to Neptune leaves shortly.
post #90 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonamac View Post

. . . What he says about Apple needing to find a way to open up iTunes is quite right. Sooner or later competition watchdogs are going to want to know how a 3rd party can compete with Apple given its current revenue model.

Why do you (and others) say this? (I assume when you say "iTunes" and "revenue" you actually mean "the iTunes Music Store?")
I get content from all over the place from and I use the iTunes player exclusively. Oddly enough, I have yet to buy any content from the iTunes Music Store (except as gifts.) The only "non-open" aspect of iTunes is on DRMed content, which apple can neither control nor "open up" (this is a condition of the publishers.)
post #91 of 226
I have a netgear router and I thoroughly regret that fact everytime I have to get up and go and switch it off and on again because it gets confused when there are too many packets going through it.
post #92 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by drdb View Post

I have a netgear router and I thoroughly regret that fact everytime I have to get up and go and switch it off and on again because it gets confused when there are too many packets going through it.

throw it away...you can find a cheap replacement and save yourself the grief lol. thats what i did. couldn't take the resets anymore!!
post #93 of 226
LOL...Too funny. Netgear? They're still in business? Last I knew they made cheap, inferior home networking stuff. Never bought it myself, but used it. I can see why SJ never gives him the time of day...
post #94 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by PRS View Post

"Once Steve Jobs goes away, which is probably not far away, then Apple will have to make a strategic decision on whether to open up the platform," Lo said on Monday."

I am dumbfounded that he said this - totally dumfounded. I had to read the quote 3 times; I didn't realize that there was anyone who was so Lo (pun intended). But looking back, it got him PR that he never could have gotten for himself.

At least you looked to see what he really said. But your interpretation is still iffy. Although he might have meant that Jobs could soon die, he also might have meant that jobs is in his fifties, has nearly achieved his goals at Apple, has a history of creating small companies that grow and revolutionize whole sectors, etc. And so, he may find a new project to pursue, may retire, may want to enjoy his family more, . . . The possibilities abound (or quite possibly, Lo may be an ass for the very reason you suspect, but who cares? I've never even heard of him before, but I know now I'll never buy anything made by Netgear.)
post #95 of 226
I bought $2000 of Netgear stock in June 2007. 3 1/2 years later it's worth $1800. You can't argue with a CEO with that sort of track record!

For comparison, during that same time period Apple stock went from 118 to 335. Almost tripled.
post #96 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Define "behind".

OS X is a fine system, but not everyone needs a Mercedes.

Definitions of behind:

in or to or toward the rear;
remaining in a place or condition that has been left or departed from;
in or into an inferior position;
having the lower score or lagging position in a contest;
buttocks;
Linux;

Linux is a fine OS but lacks the creature comforts and usability of the Mac OS.
post #97 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

If I were a Netgear employee I would be embarrassed. The man obviously doesn't know why Flash is banned. He looks like an ass-clown trying call attention to himself.

I think you meant to say "No-talent ass clown".
post #98 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

No value whatsoever. Imagine a web site which streams movies. Or sells books as PDFS. Or sells music online. Or photos. Whatever. Digital content. It builds an app to allow pre-exiting customers to see their content on an app rather than online ( for movies that would be essential because flash is not available).

If they add no value I guess no business would see any value in having a presence on the platform. They would be fine with simply having a presence in the browser.

And when did Flash become essential for viewing video on an app? I guess I missed that. I never noticed Flash was so important to the process (maybe because I don't use it?)
post #99 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by theolein View Post

I was talking about Apple killing off its professional market, the ones who produce the content that the rest are consuming. As of today you can no longer buy an XServe as Apple no longer sells them. There is no replacement (and in production houses, replacing rack mounted redundant machines with Mac Pros or Mac Minis is not possible or realistic). I was talking about how Apple is neglecting its professional software (FCP Studio, FCP Server, XSan) to such an extent that Adobe's software is now much, much better and, to top that, really does run better on Windows.

Apple is making a killing off consumer devices which are really good and provide a seamless experience, but Android will eventually eat up much of that market, leaving Apple with no core of loyal professionals that it had back when Macs were only popular amongst creative professional users.

So there are other alternatives and this may well go the way of Xserve RAID and get picked up for supply by one of the Apple spin-off companies, hardware-wise. Why should Apple focus limited resources on a part of the supply-chain that represents so little return? So FCP Studio/Server and Xsan require constant tweaking to be viable? Sounds like an unnecessary resource drain to me - again in an area that already has suitable alternatives NOT requiring addressing the whinging of so-called professionals.

Consumer product-wise, you obviously aren't paying attention to what matters - while marketshare is undeniably important - the most profitable segment of the existing marketshare is what is most critical - and what Apple goes for. You obviously don't run a Fortune 50 company or else this would be abundantly obvious to you and not require patient and persistent correction to your misunderstanding.
If you are going to insist on being an ass, at least demonstrate the intelligence to be a smart one
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If you are going to insist on being an ass, at least demonstrate the intelligence to be a smart one
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post #100 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jensonb View Post

Can someone who works in tech journalism please take the time to point out to these bozos that vertically integrated does not mean closed and that that "openness" (Especially openness for openness's sake) is, at best, a nebulous concept which has no demonstrable real-world advantages? I'm particularly keen for Google to get called out for this crap, but apparently NetGear need a talking to as well.

great point!
post #101 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by theolein View Post

You wouldn't be able to, and I'm pretty sure he wouldn't hire you either as mindless zealotry does not go down well at job interviews.

It's so funny. It seems like not long after I put people like you on my ignore list, your posts disappear anyway. Maybe you are all the same person?
post #102 of 226
I wonder if Patrick Lo has ever opened up one of his products' instruction guides or navigated their UIs. An amalgamated incomprehensible clusterfuck of Chinglish and regurgitated Google Translate gobbledygook.
post #103 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

[...]
OS X is a fine system, but not everyone needs a Mercedes.

You are right.

I'm just glad that, despite NOT being rich by any definition of the word (bar the very poor, undeveloped countries maybe) I still can afford an iPhone and an iMac.
I've accomplished my childhood's dream: My job consists mainly of playing with toys all day long.
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I've accomplished my childhood's dream: My job consists mainly of playing with toys all day long.
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post #104 of 226
hey mr. lo ... what sophia said: "jealousy is an ugly thing dorothy. and so are you in anything backless."
"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

appleinsider's mike campbell, august 15, 2013
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"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

appleinsider's mike campbell, august 15, 2013
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post #105 of 226
"lo Jobb" is a new term for something netgear's ceo wishes he could do to steve jobbs, but steve won't give him even a minute! Too bad for poor lo....
post #106 of 226
I think NETGEAR and other network device vendors are very sensitive to the functionality offered by Apple network devices, especially Airports Extremes and Remotes as well as embedded networking services that support streaming music, video, etc. in an encryptped mode.

The result is that Apple ecosystem devices and network devices play very well together creating serious challenges for network vendors.

I once had a linksys router and after the hassle and limitations managing it through a browser [windows got dedicated fully functional client] and missing functionality for MacOS, I decided to stick with Apple networking devices.

I am sure Apple has observed that Apple got secondary treatment, poor call support, etc., and so [like Adobe on Flash and User Desktop video either second class/poor or entirely abandoned, respectvely] Apple chose to ensure its customers got full service and ease of use immediately as opposed to poor service, delayed features, or deleted products support.

The issue is not open, but rather reliable service. Apple has not had to do this with Printers since HP and Epson have consistently supported Apple devices with full services.

A lesson learned for vendors, Apple has deep memory and knows which products and vendor groups abandoned Apple before and Apple will not be held hostage again the same way.
post #107 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranReloaded View Post

He's spot on. We all know how successful Linux has been, don't we?

Oh jeez... FYI Linux have a similar desktop market share than Mac (total of retail sales Linux represented 8% of desktop operating systems in 2010 *)...

Now from servers to educational, gov and scientific institutions, linux is everywhere, and we are all glad that you still ignore it.

* http://broadcast.oreilly.com/2010/09...he-1-myth.html
post #108 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by techno View Post

Another attempt by a desperate CEO to grab some headlines for his company. It is usually the bitter and jealous ones that scream the loudest.

Yeah, maybe the Netgear CEO should pay more attention to his market sector, you know...Network Infrastructure Hardware?

And why does anyone really care what his opinion is?
post #109 of 226
Reminds me of the old story about the woman who was married three times and was still a virgin. Someone asked her how that could possibly happen. She said her first husband was a lawyer. On their wedding night, he spent the entire time talking about himself. Her second husband was a doctor. He was out on emergency calls for their entire honeymoon. The third was a Linux developer. On their wedding night, he spent entire night sitting on the end of the bed telling her how great it was going to be.
Please don't be insane.
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Please don't be insane.
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post #110 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

Which looks like Android, extrapolating. I hope it isn't, but it looks like.

What they dont like is being forced to pay a ransom to Apple for content purchasing they could provide themselves. The 30% on in-app purchases for content bought through iTunes makes sense for small distributors with no web presence. For other distributors it is an extortionate racket - a price for doing business in Apple's neighborhood with no value added by Apple.

Absurd.

Thanks to this post below for saving me typing time

Quote:
Originally Posted by DJinTX View Post

So if Apple adds no value and therefore should not get a cut of the profits, then why do some of these higher end developers decide to put up with the extortion and sell through iTunes?

Lets talk it out and see...

Does selling in iTunes get them a lot of additional consumer eyes on their product? Yes
And does this then increase their sales? Yes
Do customers want, and in some cases need, an easy portal to access software and updates? Yes
Is administering their own sales and maintaining a web presence of their own time consuming and sometimes cost-prohibitive? Yes

So after all that, I'm thinking that there definitely is added value there or these developers wouldn't do it. I guess from there you might say that you agree with the added value, but that it is disproportionate with the cut Apple is taking? This could be true, but I think it would be on a case-by-case basis. Some developers probably feel the benefits outweigh the downsides, and others may not. If they feel they are still disadvantaged, then maybe iTunes isn't the right place for them.

Felt it merited a 2nd highlighting. People sound so clueless when they talk about Apple like asdasd did.
post #111 of 226
Let's face it pal.

Routers are not sexy.
post #112 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranReloaded View Post

He's spot on. We all know how successful Linux has been, don't we?

Linux has actually been very successful, just not on the desktop PC
post #113 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

Amazon and other content systems are illegal under clause 11.2 of the in-app purchasing guidelines. They may be in there, but - unless Apple change that clause - they will be kicked out eventually. Similarly with any content provider who has a separate website.

So? Buy it over a regular web connection and import it into iTunes. That's not closed, that's just not letting a competitor use your infrastructure for free.
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post #114 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jensonb View Post

Can someone who works in tech journalism please take the time to point out to these bozos that vertically integrated does not mean closed and that that "openness" (Especially openness for openness's sake) is, at best, a nebulous concept which has no demonstrable real-world advantages? I'm particularly keen for Google to get called out for this crap, but apparently NetGear need a talking to as well.


All of the comments by this CEO have nothing to do with his company´s products. If at all, the more iOS units sold, the more there is a need for routers. He should be praising Apple sales at least. Netgear shareholders and directors: please get this guy to focus!
post #115 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by drdb View Post

I have a netgear router and I thoroughly regret that fact everytime I have to get up and go and switch it off and on again because it gets confused when there are too many packets going through it.

Got a CISCO and it has no problems at all. I specially like the routers web page interface. Netgear´s web page product information sucks!
post #116 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

LT can 'reject' the label since all he is interested in is the kernel. But unless you are talking about the linux kernel source code alone you are talking 'gnu/linux'. ...

Then call it Linux + GNU stuff. Calling it GNU Linux (or GNU/Linux) to make it seem like it's a GNU project is simply dishonest.

Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

the great thing about linux based distros is that you can configure your desktop to work like windows or os x if you choose to. are they as 'polished'? nope. ...

You can select a configuration option that claims to, "configure your desktop to work like windows or os x," but not only is it not "polished", it's a lie. It doesn't work anything like either of those operating systems, and 10-15 years of "polish" that's missing is why.
post #117 of 226
Don't you hate it when people banter all about and never get to the point? Sheesh, what a worthless diatribe.
post #118 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

No value whatsoever. Imagine a web site which streams movies. Or sells books as PDFS. Or sells music online. Or photos. Whatever. Digital content. It builds an app to allow pre-exiting customers to see their content on an app rather than online ( for movies that would be essential because flash is not available).

Apple sees that as in contravention of 11.2

Apps utilizing a system other than the In App Purchase API (IAP) to purchase content, functionality, or services in an app will be rejected

That is, the very existence of a website is in violation of 11.2. ( As would be the existence of the app on other platforms were the app on other platforms to allow purchasing content which could also turn up on the iPad app).

This either forces people to either rebuy the same stuff in the app again, or pull the app.

What are Apple providing for this?

They dont store the content, nor do the streaming or downloading. They dont own the content. It is merely extortion to stay on the platform.

All those things are allowed in a web app. Your interpretation of 11.2 as a way to legislate against a website is pure hyperbole and incorrect. Section 11.2 of the developer guidelines says nothing about what web content is legal or illegal. It only says if you are going to do in app purchases they have to use Apple frameworks.

All this stuff can be imported onto an iDevice for offline viewing. If a company wants full any-moment convenience to a users credit card they have to follow a few rules for what code to use. Not too big a deal there if they really want that immediate access. Apple has provided that opportunity for them. And remember that an opportunity is not a right to do whatever you want, it is just an opportunity. So you take it or you don't, but you can always make a sale in your standard business mode with no interference from Apple.

Go make up stuff someplace else.
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post #119 of 226
This guy has no clue what he is talking about, Apple won with a closed system with the ipod and the music wars with itunes, they can survive in a market dominated by crappy android products that are cheesy and plastic. Apple is always and will always be about high end well made products that just work and get the job done. But I still think they will win the phone wars as well just watch with the Verizon iphone, thats the ticket. I think this guy should stick with selling switches and shut his stupid mouth because he is about to eat his words.
post #120 of 226
Quote:
"Steve Jobs doesn't give me a minute!"

That's OK, Lo.
I never gave Netgear a minute either.
Pity the agnostic dyslectic. They spend all their time contemplating the existence of dog.
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Pity the agnostic dyslectic. They spend all their time contemplating the existence of dog.
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