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Apple tablet stylus patent filed years before iPad debut may boost education sales

post #1 of 55
Thread Starter 
Despite Apple having disparaged the use of a stylus for touchscreens, the iPad maker's investigation of a capacitive touch-compatible stylus could play a part in the company's strategy to increase sales of its tablet device to students and schools.

Speculation surrounding an Apple patent application for a "Stylus adapted for low resolution touch sensor panels" has been rekindled on reports that such a stylus could be used to improve iPad adoption in the education market.

AppleInsider was first to discover the patent in January 2010, two weeks before the unveiling of the iPad.

The application, which proposed several different types of styli, such as a disk pivot and a powered conductive tip, for use with capacitive touch displays, was filed in July 2008, several years before the release of the iPad.



The invention is credited to John G. Elias, an Apple employee and co-founder of FingerWorks, the firm acquired by Apple during the development of the original iPhone.



The fact that Apple continues to investigate the stylus input method has raised eyebrows, as the company has gone on record declaiming the stylus as suboptimal. In 2007, during the launch of the first-generation iPhone, Apple CEO Steve Jobs said "We are all born with the ultimate pointing device -- our fingers -- and iPhone uses them to create the most revolutionary user interface since the mouse."

More recently, in April 2010, Jobs said "It's like we said on the iPad, if you see a stylus, they blew it," during the iOS 4 event. The ensuing success of Apple's tablet, which sold over 14.3 million units in its first three quarters on the market, suggests that Jobs was right to abandon the stylus.

However, a New York Times report by Nick Bilton indicates that Apple may be looking into a stylus for the iPad in order to make further inroads into the educational market. Citing "a person who works at Apple on the iPad and is not allowed to speak publicly about the company's upcoming products," Bilton asserts that the main reason for adding a stylus is to "reach a wider number of children in school."

Its one of the barriers for school kids and college students to purchase an iPad where they want the ability to take notes by hand and draw in class," said the report's source.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates predicted last year that pen-based tablets would dominate the educational market. "We think that work with the pen that Microsoft pioneered will become a mainstream for students. It can give you a device that you can not only read, but also create documents at the same time," he said.

Gates, however, has not had a good track record with predicting the rise of tablets. In 2001, he asserted that "within five years [the stylus-driven Tablet PC] will be the most popular form of PC sold in America." 10 years later, tablet sales are on the rise, but it is Apple's vision of the tablet that is succeeding.

For its part, Apple revealed in January that it has seen strong demand among education customers. A number of schools (1, 2) have begun equipping their students with iPad in hopes of assisting learning.

Apple offers volume education discounts for App Store software, allowing educational institutions to purchase multiple copies of an application in bulk.
post #2 of 55
It makes sense for fine detailed work if an app supports it. I was wondering the other day about a painting app that actually responded to a paint brush. I wonder if an iPad could be made sensitive enough?
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post #3 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

It makes sense for fine detailed work if an app supports it. I was wondering the other day about a painting app that actually responded to a paint brush. I wonder if an iPad could be made sensitive enough?

The trolls will claim that Apple/Jobs said that you should never use a stylus with a touch-based deivce, even though Jobs comments on that were clear. It shouldnt be the primary way you interact with the device.

There are clearly uses for a stylus but I think we better innovations with it from the stylus HW to the capacitance sensitivity/accuracy, and the SW that interacts with it. It needs to be integrated with the entire OS and have more pros than cons when it comes to a traditional pen/pencil if its ever to supplant the current educational standard.

Imagine a students desk that is a touchscreen monitor that they can use to do their math tests on. The question appears and they simply write on the desk using the stylus instead of a paper and hit send when they are done, or do homework that way that can read their calculations to inform of errors and even point out where they made a mistake.
post #4 of 55
The iPad would be an artist/illustrator's dream device.. At least for me. There's a good reason why Leonardo, Picasso, Rembrandt never used their fingers. It's just unnatural..

Stylus plus pressure sensitivity.. Sweet..
post #5 of 55
Oh you mean like this....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xX-B2wG1e4

what next, USB and SD card support? Why limit users at all?
post #6 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

It makes sense for fine detailed work if an app supports it. I was wondering the other day about a painting app that actually responded to a paint brush. I wonder if an iPad could be made sensitive enough?

That's funny. I had the same idea a while back. I wonder how detailed you could capture the bristles if they were made of a capacitive material. There are some good software emulators for a true brush on the app store as well though. Some might continue to argue "why?"

I'm all for a stylus myself. Pens are natural. I wouldn't want to use one on a PC tablet like Microsoft would have you, but for artistic purposes it's needed.

I think Apple would feel like they've made their point that an iPad is very different than a tablet PC by now that they could make a stylus without "confusing" people.

Also, capacitive styluses continue to persist in the 3rd party market and they are all terrible therefore it would seem a good fit for Apple to make one. The best implementation I could imagine would resemble the patent cited . If the device itself were pressure sensitive and could send that information to the iPad via bluetooth it could be a very neat work around (complete fix) to the lack of pressure sensitivity of the iPad.
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post #7 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by bettieblue View Post

Oh you mean like this....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xX-B2wG1e4

what next, USB and SD card support? Why limit users at all?

You are kidding, right? That system is a joke. Look at the screen when the doctor is doing stuff. It looks like an app straight out of 1990!

I love how people are always trying to say that there are problems with this Apple product or that one and someday they will have the 'cool' stuff that others have (like this post, USB, SD card). The fact is that Apple products just work. They think outside the box and give you a much better overall experience. If you want/need an SD card, then buy the HP unit. You and the four other people that have them can get together to talk about how superior the unit is. The rest of us will just get our work done.
post #8 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by bettieblue View Post

Oh you mean like this....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xX-B2wG1e4

what next, USB and SD card support? Why limit users at all?

No, not like that. Like a tablet that's been properly design for touch interaction, with the possibility of a stylus for special applications. As opposed to a device that actually requires a stylus, with some touch interaction bolted on.
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post #9 of 55
Must be dark days for the troll clan, when you're reduced to linking to a Windows tablet to make a point.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #10 of 55
"It can give you a device that you can not only read, but also create documents at the same time."

Yeah, you can already do that with the onscreen keyboard, which is still faster than handwriting. Which analysts would stop harping on this ridiculous "the iPad is for consumption" idea that has been debunked a million times over. They get something in their heads and no amount of reality can dislodge it. The iPad is fine for taking notes. You can also sketch well enough with just your finger.

No doubt a stylus would be nice for drawing and signing your signature, and Jobs's comment didn't rule that out (he was talking about using the stylus as the main form of input), but it's a niche use. Maybe Apple will do one, maybe they'll leave in to 3rd parties.
post #11 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by bettieblue View Post

Oh you mean like this....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xX-B2wG1e4

what next, USB and SD card support? Why limit users at all?

When the tech isn't ready, Apple says "no."

When it's ready and done to Apple's standards, it becomes a "feature."

If Apple withholds tech from a product, there's good reason for it. Learn to trust their judgment call and you'll be happier for it in the long run.
post #12 of 55
Thanks for proving me correct, bettieblue.
post #13 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

The trolls will claim that Apple/Jobs said that you should never use a stylus with a touch-based deivce, even though Jobs comments on that were clear. It shouldnt be the primary way you interact with the device.

There are clearly uses for a stylus but I think we better innovations with it from the stylus HW to the capacitance sensitivity/accuracy, and the SW that interacts with it. It needs to be integrated with the entire OS and have more pros than cons when it comes to a traditional pen/pencil if its ever to supplant the current educational standard.

I think the point Jobs was making is that interacting with your device should not require a stylus which is not the same as saying some programs/applications might not benefit from using a stylus.
post #14 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by penchanted View Post

I think the point Jobs was making is that interacting with your device should not require a stylus which is not the same as saying some programs/applications might not benefit from using a stylus.

Are you thinking I disagree with that, because that is the point I made?
post #15 of 55
I have students that have been using styluses with iPad for quite awhile. No big deal. See'em on sale at OWC: http://eshop.macsales.com/item/Ten%2...ign/TIAP25102/

I'm intrigued, but haven't tried one yet.
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post #16 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiro View Post

I have students that have been using styluses with iPad for quite awhile. No big deal. See'em on sale at OWC: http://eshop.macsales.com/item/Ten%2...ign/TIAP25102/

I'm intrigued, but haven't tried one yet.

Styluses for the iPad. They're okay for navigating. For drawing and writing, not that good.
post #17 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiro View Post

I have students that have been using styluses with iPad for quite awhile. No big deal. See'em on sale at OWC: http://eshop.macsales.com/item/Ten%2...ign/TIAP25102/

I'm intrigued, but haven't tried one yet.

I use the Pogo and it works great, for what it is, but the tech in general is still too limited to be a replacement to a pen or pencil. Thats the real issue here. When we get capacitance HW and SW that can be used as accuracy as pens and pencils that will be big. fast survive writing, the ability to hit a virtual button or click the stylus to make it an eraser of what you just wrote, like inverting a pencil to erase. There are so many possibilities but we simply havent been able to put the pieces together yet. I think Apple is the company to do it, but well need much better capacitance touch displays and a some great OS frameworks.to bring it all together.
post #18 of 55
Apole probably sees tablets specifically tailored for the Education market like The Kno http://www.kno.com/ as a threat.

It would be pretty hard to resist if publishers back it up and possibly bundle it with an online service. Book rentals, lecture capture or perhaps a learning management system.
Tuition could be used to cover the cost.

It's too bad Apple isn't serious about the Education market, if they were they wouldn't have discountinued the Xserve. Think about it. How will iPads and Mac desktops be managed easily? Don't tell me that you'll have to turn to a competitor's server solution running Windows or Linux! Going that route sends a bad message if Apple doesn't have confidence in it's server products then why go with their other products?

Let your voices be heard!

www.savethexserve.com
www.apple.com/feedback/xserve.HTML
post #19 of 55
Everyone needs to understand that it is the sensor density of capacitive screens that is the limiting factor regarding what you can do with a stylus. The sensors are, as the patent application says, (VERY) low resolution. Think of it this way. A Wacom tablet is between 150 to 200ppi. Resistive touchscreens are usually between 100 and 150ppi. An iPad is about 20ppi. Even an iPhone 4 is about 25ppi. You cannot sign your name accurately or make detailed brushstrokes with current technology being what it is. It's not about Apple not supporting a stylus. It's about capacitive touchscreen technology not supporting a stylus, period.

I was intrigued by the HP Slate, as it promised to solve this problem. But it seems no one noticed.
post #20 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Everyone needs to understand that it is the sensor density of capacitive screens that is the limiting factor regarding what you can do with a stylus. The sensors are, as the patent application says, (VERY) low resolution. Think of it this way. A Wacom tablet is between 150 to 200ppi. Resistive touchscreens are usually between 100 and 150ppi. An iPad is about 20ppi. Even an iPhone 4 is about 25ppi. You cannot sign your name accurately or make detailed brushstrokes with current technology being what it is. It's not about Apple not supporting a stylus. It's about capacitive touchscreen technology not supporting a stylus, period.

I was intrigued by the HP Slate, as it promised to solve this problem. But it seems no one noticed.

I have always wondered why iPads had no styluses and you've clearly explained it.

I use a Wacom pen on an Intuos instead of a mouse or trackpad with my Mac Mini. It's great in Photoshop and Illustrator, but awkward with inDesign. I imagine one day, that we will see an iPad with a larger screen and support for Illustrator and Photoshop with 150 to 200ppi for work on the road. I am sure Apple could have bought out Wacom with its extra cash and guess that this stylus accomplishes a different objective. Lets hope that advances in computer technology not make using our fingers to write, into a vestige as velcro has made shoelace-tying into a lost function. A stylus that also functioned as a remote microphone would also be nice.
post #21 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

When the tech isn't ready, Apple says "no."

When it's ready and done to Apple's standards, it becomes a "feature."

If Apple withholds tech from a product, there's good reason for it. Learn to trust their judgment call and you'll be happier for it in the long run.

Did you pay Apple for that brainwashing or was it free? Does "Think Different" = dont thing at all?
post #22 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Everyone needs to understand that it is the sensor density of capacitive screens that is the limiting factor regarding what you can do with a stylus. The sensors are, as the patent application says, (VERY) low resolution. Think of it this way. A Wacom tablet is between 150 to 200ppi. Resistive touchscreens are usually between 100 and 150ppi. An iPad is about 20ppi. Even an iPhone 4 is about 25ppi. You cannot sign your name accurately or make detailed brushstrokes with current technology being what it is. It's not about Apple not supporting a stylus. It's about capacitive touchscreen technology not supporting a stylus, period.

I was intrigued by the HP Slate, as it promised to solve this problem. But it seems no one noticed.

#1 Surprised I didn't notice the obvious answer, but then again I didn't pick up on the HP's promise either.
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post #23 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by bettieblue View Post

Did you pay Apple for that brainwashing or was it free? Does "Think Different" = dont thing at all?

So you think because they dont release every idea they have regardless of how good it is means they are doing nothing at all? You seriously think Apple didnt work on the iPhone and iPad for years before they came to market? Surely you do because you clearly replied to a simple statement about a product being ready and done with doing nothing at all as if its the only alternative. Maybe you should try to be a little bit objective and open minded.
post #24 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

Are you thinking I disagree with that, because that is the point I made?

Nope, I agree with you. I think I meant to respond to another post.
post #25 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Everyone needs to understand that it is the sensor density of capacitive screens that is the limiting factor regarding what you can do with a stylus. The sensors are, as the patent application says, (VERY) low resolution. Think of it this way. A Wacom tablet is between 150 to 200ppi. Resistive touchscreens are usually between 100 and 150ppi. An iPad is about 20ppi. Even an iPhone 4 is about 25ppi. You cannot sign your name accurately or make detailed brushstrokes with current technology being what it is. It's not about Apple not supporting a stylus. It's about capacitive touchscreen technology not supporting a stylus, period.

I was intrigued by the HP Slate, as it promised to solve this problem. But it seems no one noticed.

Well, even with very low resolution, the dudes get pretty good notes. I'm sure you could get even finer notes with higher resolution, but I think resolution is a red herring.

I base that on a year with a 12" cintiq that I find all but worthless for text based notes. I had hoped I could use it for marking up PDFs, but it has been utterly worthless to me that way. I have tried over a dozen software packages, across both the Mac and PC (shudder)and have yet to find anything useful.

I think the bottom line is the application level software support more than the resolution.
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post #26 of 55
If you want to see a truly remarkable demo showing touch and stylus working together, look no further:

Project Gustav - Bill Buxton MIX10 Keynote


The other thing to point out, is that Wacom actually holds a boatload of Patents regarding stylus, tablets, and pressure sensitivity.

Apple could (should?) buy them with pocket change.

I've been using a Wacom tablet of one kind or another for at least 15+ years. Still have my original A5 ADB for a PowerPC, and haven't used a mouse at all for years.

Some 10 years ago I had a friend build a drafting table like setup for me, where the tablet is inset, and the keyboard is centered above and tilted slightly. On the left is a padded area as an arm-rest. Ergonomically, the absolute best solution to 16+ hour, and multi-day marathon design projects.
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post #27 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

If you want to see a truly remarkable demo showing touch and stylus working together, look no further:

Project Gustav - Bill Buxton MIX10 Keynote


I've been using a Wacom pad of one kind or another for at least 15+ years. Still have my original A5 ADB for a PowerPC, and haven't used a mouse at all for years.

If you can point me to an adaptor I would be very grateful. I still have an oversize pro A4 Wacom ADB pad with loads of levels of sensitivity, and I can't bear to part with it. I can't afford to replace it either. Are there any good ADB to USB adaptors, and would there be any drivers around that might get the pad to work with Leopard? Thanks. (I use a dual 2.5GHz G5 PowerMac and a Core2 duo iMac if that helps.)
post #28 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wurm5150 View Post

The iPad would be an artist/illustrator's dream device.. At least for me. There's a good reason why Leonardo, Picasso, Rembrandt never used their fingers. It's just unnatural..

Stylus plus pressure sensitivity.. Sweet..

I suppose the pressure sensitivity would come from the stylus linked back by BT?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

When the tech isn't ready, Apple says "no."

When it's ready and done to Apple's standards, it becomes a "feature."

If Apple withholds tech from a product, there's good reason for it. Learn to trust their judgment call and you'll be happier for it in the long run.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bettieblue View Post

Did you pay Apple for that brainwashing or was it free? Does "Think Different" = dont thing at all?

No he's right. If you just want the feature there's a hundred £200 android tablets or WinMo phones that already boast the feature on their spec sheet. If you want the feature implemented in a way that is actually usable in hardware/software (and ecosystem) to the majority you wait for the Apple product.

You can call it brainwashing, actually it's just delightful when you buy a product that works as expected.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bettieblue View Post

Oh you mean like this....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xX-B2wG1e4

what next, USB and SD card support? Why limit users at all?

Great, so go buy one; but people, in general, don't because the experience doesn't match the spec sheet. Although of course there will be a few thousand buyers for this device, I'm not claiming that people won't buy them just not mass-market.
post #29 of 55
I'd like to use a stylus with an iPad for the 'capture' part of note-taking, which would let me scribble, draw etc while listening to people ( meetings, lectures, podcasts, etc ).

No handwriting recognition, just straight capture to 'paper'.

Then I'll process later into a more systematic tool for whatever I'm working on.

Very GTD.

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post #30 of 55
It's definitely incumbent on apple to provide a comprehensive replacement to dead tree tech. Everybody's speculating on what they'll do with their "war chest" and i think buying a large interest in wacom would serve them well in this area. I lug around a 17" macbook pro with an intuos tablet through design school - the small cintiq just has too many external parts (power brick, monitor connection box, etc.) to be a practical mobile alternative. An iPad with Cintiq abilities that recognized the difference between touch and stylus input? - I'd pass out from excitement.
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post #31 of 55
I was wondering the same thing too, at one point. When I saw the HP device, touting its potential use for note taking (class, conferences, meeting, etc.), doodles, architectural renditions, and as important documents signature, a big thing in many commercial transactions (contracts, etc.), I thought: It would have been nice if the iOS devices could do that. I thought it was a shortcoming of the iOS devices -- but it turned out, it was not the case.

If the author and some of the readers have only done an internet search, and more specifically, a YOU TUBE search, they would have found that the use of stylus for iOS devices initially for the iPhone and iPod touch have been done long before the iPad was even introduced.

Critics (and detractors, including Bill Gates), and those bloggers and mainstream journalists who simply regurgitate those they read -- are misinformed or are party to the misinformation that iOS devices are somewhat wanting for not being able to use a pen stylus. In this sense, Steve Jobs, is also mistaken to claim that the pen stylus is not needed for iOS devices. Many iOS device users want to use a stylus, for more exacting needs -- arts, architectural renditions, note taking, etc., and they created their own contraption to do so. Some created their own stylus also because they do not want to pay the ridiculous prices charged by the earlier commercial sources.

I link one of the 2010 video here of one artist, kobausks, who has been so obsessed about perfecting the best stylus he could make for his art work using iOS devices -- suitable for Asian calligraphy, for the various art Apps, even cartoons, both still and video:


iOS devices -- iPhone, iPod touch and iPad -- can use a stylus.


kobausks's earlier Japanese You Tube videos have detailed instructions, including crediting another Asian who gave him the inspiration. To share his home made fine-tipped pen stylus to the rest of the world, he endeavored to make several English versions of the Japanese videos. His perfection of the fine-tipped stylus also improved upon the ugly "wire contraption" by earlier creators of pen stylus for iOS devices, using throw away materials (e.g., Japanese potato chips bags) but gradually fine-tuning them to use more sturdy but readily available materials (e.g., windows insulator embedded with magnetic metal or similar materials that allow electrostatic conduction).

kobausks also has videos creating simple contraptions, including a hanger, to use as a support for the iOS devices. There are commercial stands too, if you are not into making your own.

kobausks has posted his first stylus creation in 2008, and has been fine-tuning it since. But, if you look at You Tube, people all over the world have created their own iOS stylus, as early as 2008, just so many months after the iPhone, known for finger touch navigation came out..

I am amazed sometimes how Apple Insider authors are either so lazy, or just too obsessed with what comes out only from Apple, or simply regurgitating posts from other internet sites, and miss so much information already found in the internet.

There are also companies selling commercial stylus, including fine-tipped stylus, that work for the IPhone and iPod Touch, even before the iPad was introduced, Obviously, they work for the iPad, too.

As to very fine stylus that would work for art, again you will find very well-made stylus, among them by Japanese artists and artists all over the world, initially for the iPhone and iPod touch, but then also applied for the iPad. This guy is not the first, but he was so passionate about creating the best stylus, using initial ideas posted by others.


iPad Superfine Stylus Pen Painting movie 1 (English) (new→6)

kobausks 35 videos

<iframe title="YouTube video player" width="640" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ykD76JXOfgM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Try typing iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad and art also, to discover how much creative work have been done not just with fingers (touch) but also using fine-tipped (or even not so fine tipped stylus).

While one company sells commercial pen stylus at ridiculously high prices, especially the fine-tipped stylus, you will now find in You Tube, other commercial suppliers of pen stylus for as low as $2 each. Others who do not want to pay that much ($2), many iOS device users have been showing "How To's" in You Tube, for those who want to make their own stylus -- for any purpose they think they might need to use their iOS devices.

The fingers touch is an intuitive way to interact with an iOS device, but one can use the stylus, if one needs to, or has a need to use one.


Apple Ecosystems

N.B. It is almost a sacrilege to contradict Steve Jobs, one can also use the finger(s) or the stylus to write or create art work, not in horizontal position, but in inclined position. See also the other You Tube Demos of the artist linked above. There are also many companies selling gadgets already to assist in inclined position writing or using a stylus.
post #32 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by bettieblue View Post

Did you pay Apple for that brainwashing or was it free? Does "Think Different" = dont thing at all?

It is you that doesn't think too hard. Technology moves forward and things become feasible that were not before. That was what was meant by Quadra 610. Apple simply doesn't implement something as a gimmick, Apple waits until hardware and software can make that new technology really work. Note also that Apple are always the first to drop a technology if it is past its time when others cling on to it.
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post #33 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

If you want to see a truly remarkable demo showing touch and stylus working together, look no further:

Project Gustav - Bill Buxton MIX10 Keynote


The other thing to point out, is that Wacom actually holds a boatload of Patents regarding stylus, tablets, and pressure sensitivity.

Apple could (should?) buy them with pocket change.

I've been using a Wacom tablet of one kind or another for at least 15+ years. Still have my original A5 ADB for a PowerPC, and haven't used a mouse at all for years.

Some 10 years ago I had a friend build a drafting table like setup for me, where the tablet is inset, and the keyboard is centered above and tilted slightly. On the left is a padded area as an arm-rest. Ergonomically, the absolute best solution to 16+ hour, and multi-day marathon design projects.

Good point, Apple + iOS + Wacom might be a nice combo, especially as you say due to patents. A 27" or larger iMac with an OS X and iOS combination that swivels down for an art application that allows bristles of a brush to work like a paint brush in water color then swivels back to use a mouse with an AutoCad type application ... a powerful all around tool!
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post #34 of 55
Of course the Stylus can never be the primary input in a multitouch world but I'm sure the option will appeal to a large section of the Mac-faithful in the graphics world.
post #35 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrtotes View Post

Of course the Stylus can never be the primary input in a multitouch world but I'm sure the option will appear to a large section of the Mac-faithful in the graphics world.

You are so right ...
Watch this ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHhB2BF5yQM
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post #36 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

You are so right ...
Watch this ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHhB2BF5yQM

I found the videos of kobausks very fascinating and respect the perfection that Asian artists do to make what is needed for their work. Thus, I linked to one of his 2010 videos in my previous post just above to show that the stylus has been in use by iOS device users almost months after the iPhone was out. His attempt to perfect a fine-tipped stylus for iOS devices was tried first using the iPhone in 2008, then the iPod touch and finally the iPad.

There were others before him, but none has shown the same passion and dedication to create the best fine-tipped stylus that could be made for the more exacting demands of fine art -- Asian calligraphy, all of the art apps available in the Apps store, including cartoons (still and videos), and the more unique Japanese "Animes".

The use of fine-tipped pen stylus avoids the zooming in and out that would be needed when using the more imprecise finger touch painting, although other artists from all over the world have shown also that one can use finger touch exclusively to create details in any form of art work in iOS devices. There are literally thousands of You Tube videos of the various styles and techniques using both fine-tipped pen stylus and exclusive finger touch painting in iOS devices -- the iPad being a favorite now because of its larger real estate.

At one point, I thought too that one of the limitations of the iOS devices was the lack of stylus for more exacting needs.

One such application is "signatures for commercial transactions. A FAXed material of an original document is now replacing printed documents, as initial official proof, of a transaction. [The actual document may be exchanged later, if needed for more exacting requirements.]

When I went to buy something at the Apple Store in Boston, the Apple staff asked me to sign my name with my finger on the small mobile cashier they now used at Apple Stores. I found that ridiculous. And, I told the Apple staff, they really need a stylus for these purposes.

Then, I saw the HP Tablet, touting its ability to use touch, and the stylus specifically for more exacting commercial transactions. The edge that the HP ads tried to imply was that Apple's iOS devices is not capable of using a stylus, and thus, a good reason for buying the HP Tablet.

The misinformation that iOS devices cannot use a stylus has been cast, by critics and detractors, including Bill Gates. And, to an extent, the way Steve Jobs, phrased his dismissal of the stylus. These "authorities" have been spewed back without further investigation by bloggers and mainstream media.

I investigated this issue, after I have seen the HP Tablet commercial. And, it was eye-opening how we could be so misinformed.


Perception became the accepted fact....
and by simple repetitions by the lemmings among bloggers and mainstream media.


Apple Ecosystems
post #37 of 55
deleted
post #38 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Everyone needs to understand that it is the sensor density of capacitive screens that is the limiting factor regarding what you can do with a stylus. The sensors are, as the patent application says, (VERY) low resolution. Think of it this way. A Wacom tablet is between 150 to 200ppi. Resistive touchscreens are usually between 100 and 150ppi. An iPad is about 20ppi. Even an iPhone 4 is about 25ppi. You cannot sign your name accurately or make detailed brushstrokes with current technology being what it is. It's not about Apple not supporting a stylus. It's about capacitive touchscreen technology not supporting a stylus, period.

I was intrigued by the HP Slate, as it promised to solve this problem. But it seems no one noticed.

thank you. I have always wondered why the obvious advantages of using a pen on the ipad for drawing and taking notes were not utilized. You explained it. We'll see if the ipad2 gets better on this point.
post #39 of 55
None of you had the "idea" for a paint brush stylus. It's just common sense. Taking common sense and spinning it off as if it was an idea you had is pretty lame. It will be great when it happens, but so far even the iPad screen cannot recognize so many separate inputs so close together.
post #40 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

None of you had the "idea" for a paint brush stylus. It's just common sense. Taking common sense and spinning it off as if it was an idea you had is pretty lame. It will be great when it happens, but so far even the iPad screen cannot recognize so many separate inputs so close together.

I for one do not understand who you are aiming this comment at or what point you are trying to make other than it seems to be negative for some reason on a thread that is upbeat and optimistic? Need more fiber?
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
Reply
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
Reply
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