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Apple rumored to hold "small event" in March to usher in new iPad - Page 2

post #41 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post

A thought about form factor and NFC. An iPhone or iPod Touch is a more convenient size to be carrying around when shopping. Not to rule out iPad 2, but let's be practical here.

NFC does far more that just payments. It lets you exchange small amounts of information without pairing (a problem with Bluetooth) or being on the same network (a problem with WiFi).

Bluetooth could do similar things that NFC could, but it requires that a user has it turned on all the time draining battery and thus isn't as passive as NFC.
post #42 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

Serious question: In Canada, when you are ready to pay and leave the store, do you go to the chequestand and cheque out?

Not needling, I'd really like to know how you handle that.

I'm pretty sure that "check," "check-out," "check-in" etc. are all spelt ("spelled" to you), the same way up here as they are in the USA if that's what you mean.

The homonym "cheque" (meaning those little slips of paper) has always been spelt the other way. Everywhere but the USA I guess.

post #43 of 99
The clerk behind the desk will have to bite his tongue to keep from laughing out loud.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I'm pretty sure that "check," "check-out," "check-in" etc. are all spelt ("spelled" to you), the same way up here as they are in the USA if that's what you mean.

The homonym "cheque" (meaning those little slips of paper) has always been spelt the other way. Everywhere but the USA I guess.


It saves on letters thus is good for the environment.

Kidding aside the removal of excess characters does save disk space, makes for easier reading and simply looks better in print.
post #44 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

People still use cheques (sic)?

I used to play Chequers; I'm now an Exchequer. And I lived in the Cheque Republique while (not whilst) I chequed off my daily stock piques. No more craques about how we Ameriquans spell things.

Sheesh.
post #45 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

From wikipedia:
The spellings check, checque, and cheque were used interchangeably from the 17th century until the 20th century.[2] However, since the 19th century, the spelling cheque (from the French word chèque) has become standard for the financial instrument in the Commonwealth and Ireland, while check is used only for the verb "to verify", thus distinguishing the two definitions in writing.[nb 3]
In American English, the usual spelling for both is check.[4]

Cheque is a French word...

You know, for the life me I can't understand why there have been so many fights, wars, and petty grievances over the centuries between the English and the French, and then the English are loathe to modernize their language and get rid of the leftover Norman spellings. Take a basic unit of measurement, the meter, for example. Only French and BritEnglish spell it "metre" in the EU. Everyone else spells it "meter." You'd think that with their Francophobia they'd love to get rid of the pervasive ancient French spellings.
post #46 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

The homonym "cheque" (meaning those little slips of paper) has always been spelt the other way. Everywhere but the USA I guess.

Not true. It's a fact that many other people who speak English as a second language are using USA English when writing in English. I'm not trying to be linguophobic or jingoistic here but I do have several decades of experience abroad and have personally seen this to be the case. The exceptions are, logically, former British colonies, but even in Hong Kong the common English (as opposed to the official English) is written in the American style. Russians, Hungarians, Japanese, Finns, and Germans (among many others) with who I currently correspond use the American style. It's a fact of life and has probably been accelerated by pervasive American English on the Internet.
post #47 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ecphorizer View Post

You know, for the life me I can't understand why there have been so many fights, wars, and petty grievances over the centuries between the English and the French, and then the English are loathe to modernize their language and get rid of the leftover Norman spellings. Take a basic unit of measurement, the meter, for example. Only French and BritEnglish spell it "metre" in the EU. Everyone else spells it "meter." You'd think that with their Francophobia they'd love to get rid of the pervasive ancient French spellings.

The UK are crazy with their units of measurements. From the archiac stones for weight to using Km for distance and MPH for speed on mororways to using F for temp when it's hot and C for when it's cold because they sound more dramatic at those respective ends.
post #48 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

How are you going to "guarantee" this?

He's got full access to Dr. Tyrell. He knows all.

Cheque it out.
post #49 of 99
Starbucks is already putting the RF hardware in place for the transactions.
post #50 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eideard View Post

Starbucks is already putting the RF hardware in place for the transactions.

Link?
post #51 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stourque View Post

Same way, only it's spell cheque rather than check. A check is what we do in a hockey game - a body check. We also have coloured money so when we drink Canadian beer we can tell the difference between a 5 and a 10 dollar bill.

And we spell rumour with a 'u'. Rumour, humour, colour. But igloo has no 'u', nor does Tim Horton's.

Yes, I'll be the first to admit America screwed too much with the English language and couldn't leave well enough alone by letting Rumour, humour, colour, cheque and more remain in their proper forms.
post #52 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

People still use cheques (sic)?

Yes, people still use "checks". We don't use 'cheques', because we aren't British and aren't influenced by the French language. You should know this professor.

Quote:
The homonym "cheque" (meaning those little slips of paper) has always been spelt the other way. Everywhere but the USA I guess.

Actually, the word was derived from the Persian's, and was originally 'چک' or "Chek/Chak" - (negotiable instrument instructing a financial institution to pay a specific amount of a specific currency from a specific demand account held in the maker/depositor's name with that institution.) Seems the American version would be more correct to me?

You should also know that America influences the English language, more than England does. This is a byproduct of the Hollywood/media influence. Turn on your TV, go to a movie theater or flip on the internet anywhere in the Commonwealth to see this.

We also don't stand in 'queues', have 'boots' in our cars, use 'slipways' or 'motorways', wear 'rubbers' on our feet, smoke 'fags', go to the 'theatre', drive 'lorries', etc...

Anyway, it will be interesting to see if NFC can replace the need for bluetooth. A huge market would open to include 3rd party hands free system and devices. Headphones, cash/pay points, hands free devices, remote car starter, etc...
post #53 of 99
Another reason to hold a small event is to re-emphasize the existence of the new apple TV, for all those countries where it hasn't been introduced yet.
post #54 of 99
The NFC idea could be huge for Apple. Imagine going up to vending machine, say, and buying a snack there and charging it via your iPhone to your iTunes account. Even 0.5% per transaction could be huge.

It seems to me that thi would really only work well in environments where you are able to get a good cell phone signal (no wi-fi only devices). I know too often I cannot seem to get a good signal inside larger stores like wal-mart, etc.
post #55 of 99
I am pretty dubious that American spellings predominate in the English speaking world. It might in the English as a 2nd language world.
I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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post #56 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

That explains why the iPad was such a pathetic failure.

No, everyone knows that the iPad failed because Apple's board hadn't published a succession plan.
post #57 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

Serious question: In Canada, when you are ready to pay and leave the store, do you go to the chequestand and cheque out?

Not needling, I'd really like to know how you handle that.

The American version of English is a step or two below the Canadian version. If you want to spin it some other way, fine, but it's best that you not go there. And don't even get me started on the whole metric thing.
post #58 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stourque View Post

Same way, only it's spell cheque rather than check. A check is what we do in a hockey game - a body check. We also have coloured money so when we drink Canadian beer we can tell the difference between a 5 and a 10 dollar bill.

And we spell rumour with a 'u'. Rumour, humour, colour. But igloo has no 'u', nor does Tim Horton's.

So many u's from a people who pronounce "about" as "a-BOOT" ...

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

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I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

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post #59 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

The American version of English is a step or two below the Canadian version. If you want to spin it some other way, fine, but it's best that you not go there. And don't even get me started on the whole metric thing.

You are saying that a language is better than another or that the nation of people are beet than another? Either way your comment saddens me.
post #60 of 99
With so many rumours floating about, many rather contradictory, it's obvious that Apple has done a great job of maintaining secrecy.

Here's what is reasonable to assume. There will be an iPad 2 introduced and going on sale by the end of April. This device is probably going to be lighter, have more power and more memory. No matter how capable, the device will be soundly criticized in the early going by many for what it hasn't added. Also reasonable to assume is that the device will likely go on sale within days of being introduced, not within weeks, and certainly not months.

I think it is unclear what, if anything, Apple will change regarding the display. Most seem satisfied with the current display and yet there is room for improvement. Cost will be the No. 1 issue.

There is no pressure from the competition at this time. Even if all Apple did was make minor improvements, the iPad would remain ahead of anything that appears imminent in 2011 from other companies. If Apple does more than minor tweaking it would be to seriously take hold of the tablet market, repeating the great success the iPod enjoyed in the MP3 space.

The question is, does Apple do a minor upgrade to ride out the coming year or go for the jugular by hauling out the heavy artillery sooner than later. Apple right now has something the others do not. Economies of scale. While the new iPad will sell by the millions, tablets from the other companies will likely sell in low volumes. The competition will, for one thing, be taking less than 50 per cent of this newer market and dividing it up between many competitors. Apple will probably nail down more than half this market and have it all to itself. This is a competitive advantage that Apple will try hard to maintain.
post #61 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

You are saying that a language is better than another or that the nation of people are beet than another? Either way your comment saddens me.

What saddens me is that you don't understand the rather tongue-in-cheek (should I say tongue-in-cheque) nature of my comment.

Some of my best relatives are proud US citizens and fine, intelligent, decent folks none the less. And I would gladly exchange Harper for Obama any day of the week. Sadly, right about now, many Americans are reading this and asking, who's Harper. More alarming, a smaller number - I certainly hope smaller - are asking, who's Obama.
post #62 of 99
What have I done...
post #63 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Canada makes beer?

Take off, you hoser!

post #64 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

With so many rumours floating about, many rather contradictory, it's obvious that Apple has done a great job of maintaining secrecy.

Yeah they have. It's impressive an organization that big, with so much focus on them, and with so many people and companies involved can maintain even a fraction of the secrecy they have.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

What saddens me is that you don't understand the rather tongue-in-cheek (should I say tongue-in-cheque) nature of my comment.

Some of my best relatives are proud US citizens and fine, intelligent, decent folks none the less. And I would gladly exchange Harper for Obama any day of the week. Sadly, right about now, many Americans are reading this and asking, who's Harper. More alarming, a smaller number - I certainly hope smaller - are asking, who's Obama.

Ah, I didn't read any factiousness in your post. Knowing the leaders of all other nations isn't important to the average person, and don't think it should be. For people outside the US to know about the US doesn't make the US dumb, it just shows the US is a bigger focus than other nations' politics.

For instance, even those that don't own Apple products will likely know the name of the CEO, yet how many of those people using Nokia products (still the most commonly sold handset) know the name of the CEO? How many people outside of Canada who love their BB know RiM's CEOs? Do more people in Canada know the name Steve Jobs or Mike Lazardis?

People know their national government officials to an extent but that knowledge drops off sharply as you move toward the local level? That's martial, and the US is still the most popular kid in class... for the time being.
post #65 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post

appleinsider "discovers" things like my european ancestors "discovered" america.

I'd be careful with such analogies about who discovered America , the research is still on going on that one
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
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From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
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post #66 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac.World View Post

Yes, people still use "checks". We don't use 'cheques', because we aren't British and aren't influenced by the French language. You should know this professor.



Actually, the word was derived from the Persian's, and was originally 'چک' or "Chek/Chak" - (negotiable instrument instructing a financial institution to pay a specific amount of a specific currency from a specific demand account held in the maker/depositor's name with that institution.) Seems the American version would be more correct to me?

You should also know that America influences the English language, more than England does. This is a byproduct of the Hollywood/media influence. Turn on your TV, go to a movie theater or flip on the internet anywhere in the Commonwealth to see this.

We also don't stand in 'queues', have 'boots' in our cars, use 'slipways' or 'motorways', wear 'rubbers' on our feet, smoke 'fags', go to the 'theatre', drive 'lorries', etc...

Anyway, it will be interesting to see if NFC can replace the need for bluetooth. A huge market would open to include 3rd party hands free system and devices. Headphones, cash/pay points, hands free devices, remote car starter, etc...

I enjoyed this post (as a one time Brit). I would add that some words used here in the US that came from England early on are still used here while those same words have died out in England. Spelling evolves and we shouldn't get too hung up and pompous (note that 'u' survived lol) about what it 'correct'. Personally, I find really bad grammar worse than alternative spelling. Although I am as guilty as anyone of making errors.

On a lighter note I was amused to read the other day about how Warren G. Harding's mangling of 'normality' into 'normalcy' created a new word.

p.s. My only gripe about the US is the 'pint' of beer losing 4 fluid oz.
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
Reply
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
Reply
post #67 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

What have I done...

I was thinking the same thing, but it was actually the Prof what started it. But I'm glad he did. Slow news day. And I learned that cheque/check comes from Persian, which if true (I'll be looking that one up, believe me) makes it either closer to our common Indo-European heritage, or, wait for it, Arabic. I'll report on findings, if anyone's interested.

Back on topic, NFC sounds like the opening of a vast new technology, financed by how it reduces friction at the . . . checkout.
post #68 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

Yeah they have. It's impressive an organization that big, with so much focus on them, and with so many people and companies involved can maintain even a fraction of the secrecy they have.



Ah, I didn't read any factiousness in your post. Knowing the leaders of all other nations isn't important to the average person, and don't think it should be. For people outside the US to know about the US doesn't make the US dumb, it just shows the US is a bigger focus than other nations' politics.

For instance, even those that don't own Apple products will likely know the name of the CEO, yet how many of those people using Nokia products (still the most commonly sold handset) know the name of the CEO? How many people outside of Canada who love their BB know RiM's CEOs? Do more people in Canada know the name Steve Jobs or Mike Lazardis?

People know their national government officials to an extent but that knowledge drops off sharply as you move toward the local level? That's martial, and the US is still the most popular kid in class... for the time being.

That's a valid point but it is a given that US citizens, generally speaking, do tend to be less aware of what goes on outside their borders than let's say the typical Canadian. I suppose that's to be expected because the US is the biggest player on the world stage at this time.
post #69 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by theskeptic View Post

This could be a classic Apple move with them providing an entire payments ecosystem in one stroke. The iPad could be the core of a great point of sale system.

It's already being used that way.

On the NFC front, exploring likel means as a possible addition to the iPad 3. They have to sort out the tech and get various groups on board. Which will happen in time for the typical 'release all cool things for the iPhone first' game. So the iPhone 5 will have the same basic form, perhaps a faster processor, reduced glare glass, maybe more storage and a little better camera. And now NFC as the cool kid trick.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

Link?

He is perhaps referring to
http://www.starbucks.com/coffeehouse/mobile-apps/starbucks-card-mobile

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

No, everyone knows that the iPad failed because Apple's board hadn't published a succession plan.

So wrong and yet so right

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

Here's what is reasonable to assume. There will be an iPad 2 introduced and going on sale by the end of April. This device is probably going to be lighter, have more power and more memory. No matter how capable, the device will be soundly criticized in the early going by many for what it hasn't added. Also reasonable to assume is that the device will likely go on sale within days of being introduced, not within weeks, and certainly not months.

Very reasonable assumptions. Although I would clarify the on sale comment with 'in the US'. Some countries just go th iPad and there is no cause to assume the red tape for a new version is covered. Or that Apple won roll out in groups due to demand. So some areas could have to wait at least 2-3 months to get it


Quote:
The question is, does Apple do a minor upgrade to ride out the coming year or go for the jugular by hauling out the heavy artillery sooner than later.

They will do some kind of upgrade because if they don't, the public will start to hold out for the other boys with their promises of cameras, faster processors etc. plus Apple has always been about constant small changes on a regular basis with the iOS stuff. Makes it easier to test and refine




Quote:
Originally Posted by Realistic View Post

+1 Even if iPad2 is just a minor upgrade from the original iPad, Apple wouldn't slip in a change to a very hot major product category in a low key fashion.

A small venue announcement isn't really low key when you are also live streaming and you have local press there with every tech blog reporting every word to all the tech boys stuck at work and secretly reading their twitter feeds when th boss isn't looking.

The same tech boys that cream their shorts ten times in five minutes when the online store goes down, or an event announcement is made. The same tech boys that treat unboxing videos and early reviews like it is the Super Bowl, World Series, World Cup and Olympics rolled into one.

Apple could send out a press release and post a couple of videos and The Boys will go blind, deaf and dumb reloading them all day and night. And possibly crash half the Internet in the process. AND then sell their grandmothers into white slavery to get whatever in the first hour of the first day. Even if only to write a scathing negative review on thei blog, return it and use the money to buy an onlien Russian bride (screw Granny)

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #70 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

That's a valid point but it is a given that US citizens, generally speaking, do tend to be less aware of what goes on outside their borders than let's say the typical Canadian. I suppose that's to be expected because the US is the biggest player on the world stage at this time.

Sure, it's all relative, but your comments seems to imply that Americans* are less aware of politics than other countries has no merit. The US is huge in a vast numbers of ways, for better or for worse, so a Nigerian who is aware of the US' head offcials doesn't mean he's smarter or more "political" than a US citizen who doesn't about the Nigerian government. Same goes for other areas, like entertainment. Around the world US entertaIners meld with that nation's entertainers. Only a few countries have successful make the cross over into e US mainstream and that seems to correlate to a similar language and culture.

* As in the only country that has word America in it, not referring to the Western hemisphere.
post #71 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post

So many u's from a people who pronounce "about" as "a-BOOT" ...

Those are the Brits that use that pronunciation.

The biggest reason for the letter u being dropped from many words, especially in publications like newspapers, is because of spell checkers. (not spell chequers)
post #72 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I enjoyed this post (as a one time Brit) ....

p.s. My only gripe about the US is the 'pint' of beer losing 4 fluid oz.

Would that be 4 US oz or imp oz?
40 imp oz = 1 imp quart
32 US oz = 1 US quart
4 pints per quart
4 quarts per gallon so
160 imp oz = 1 imp gallon
128 US oz = 1 US gallon
100 imp gallons = 120 US gallons
and to confuse some more
3.8 liters = 1 US gallon
4.5 litres = 1 imp gallon

I think I need a beer.


I need a beer.
post #73 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post

So many u's from a people who pronounce "about" as "a-BOOT" ...

Untrue!!!1!111

There are three relevant phonemes in canadian English
Ow - as in how now brown cow
Ou - as in house, mouse, trout, and the infamous about
Oo - as in moose, true, and Labatt Blue

American English is impoverished in reducing this to two sounds, collapsing the first two categories together :b
post #74 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stourque View Post

I think I need a beer.

I need a beer.

A case of two-four eh
post #75 of 99
Anyone have word on whether an embedded NFC could be completely disabled by the owner? Otherwise it's something I'll never purchase.

Quote:
Originally Posted by euler View Post

Imagine going up to vending machine, say, and buying a snack there and charging it via your iPhone to your iTunes account. Even 0.5% per transaction could be huge.

And imagine going up to a vending machine, buying a snack with your NFC, and having every aspect of that transaction logged, added to your personal profile and sold to marketers. Who you are, where you are, what time it is, are you there every day at that time, what else do you buy there.... That part isn't an IF, but a WHEN. Eventually, if legislation concerning RFID usage for tracking doesn't happen, not only every transaction, but every physical movement you make will be trackable. Instead of knee-jerk "tinfoil hat" comments, people should read up on what's happening, because it will take pressure from consumers to keep this technology in check (cheque! ;-) ). This technology provides the potential for new conveniences, but privacy protections need to be built in from the start.

One doesn't have to be a gub'mint conspiracy theorist to see that massive personal profiling is already happening online. These companies use every tool available, including ignorance, apathy and deception. Personal profiles are incredibly valuable, and because (virtually) all companies are motivated by profit, they will take advantage of whatever data they are allowed to use. This trend will push to the offline world if we allow it.

Sadly, whether or not you care about being tracked and profiled depends mostly on your generation. Obviously if you're a foursquare user, you don't give a shit, and don't care about people knowing you're not home, etc. (see: pleaserobme.com, hope you don't have a family) At least with Foursquare you can decide to participate or not by turning it off, but if/when RFID tags are embedded in our clothing and/or in our phones, all bets are off. That means kids would be tracked as well, which is beyond creepy. And yes, these things can easily be read at a distance, with custom hardware.

Some efforts to embed RFID in clothing have thus far been thwarted by public education, i.e. the Benneton boycott. Walmart is a huge proponent of RFID, and was planning to embed in various clothing, but appears to have switched, for now, to putting them on removable tags. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...061198090.html (anyone have more info on the current status of this?)

For a commonsense (non-fanatical) review of location-based privacy issues, read this:

http://www.eff.org/wp/locational-privacy

And this, if you think using "anonymous" numeric IDs are really anonymous:

http://epic.org/privacy/reidentification/

Everyone should read and understand these basic issues, no matter your level of participation.

Bottom line is that when you combine wireless tracking with object(s) that are on your person at all times containing your identity (iPhone, driver's license in some states), it opens up many kinds of misuse and abuse.
No Matte == No Sale :-(
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No Matte == No Sale :-(
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post #76 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

Sure, it's all relative, but your comments seems to imply that Americans* are less aware of politics than other countries has no merit. The US is huge in a vast numbers of ways, for better or for worse, so a Nigerian who is aware of the US' head offcials doesn't mean he's smarter or more "political" than a US citizen who doesn't about the Nigerian government.

um, there is another possibility, apparently difficult for Americans (or as I like to call them, Great Satan-ers) to conceive:

People outside the US know more about the rest of the world, where "rest of the world" does not mean "the USA"

Ps seriously I love the States - it's fascinating and rich in history - but there's no question it's gotta be the most self-absorbed place on earth
post #77 of 99
enough with the off-topic meta-discussion already. nobody cares about how words are spelled in other countries. talk about apple stuff or GTFO.
post #78 of 99
"small event" for Large iPad?
Hmmm.... sounds fishy.
post #79 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Voight-Kampff View Post

We all know that the iPad 2 will have a front-facing camera for video chat, and we all know that Apple is going to advertise that fact and make a big deal about it, even though they defended its absence in the first iPad.

I think that's a fair point. I won't use the cameras, myself. The thing Apple won't talk about will be the most important update - the RAM increase. RAM, lighter, SD-Card slot, in that order. That's what I would like.

What I'm looking forward to is iOS 5. Specifically the redesigned notification system and hopefull a Safari File Browser. We need the ability to upload photos directly from Safari. There's no getting around this fact. It holds the iPad back like nothing else. It'd be nice not having to explain to my brother why the iPad can't upload photos from Safari when he asks me after buying it from me.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #80 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

"small event" for Large iPad?
Hmmm.... sounds fishy.

Yeah, small event at the Apple campus with the key journalists of the world and broadcast live on the homepage of Apple.com. It doesn't get much smaller than that, haha.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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