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Georgia state senator hopes to replace schoolbooks with iPads

post #1 of 160
Thread Starter 
The state of Georgia is reportedly considering a plan to get rid of conventional textbooks and shift middle school classrooms in the state to wireless iPads built by Apple, following positive iPad trials in place by schools around the US.

Republican Senate President pro tem Tommie Williams told the press earlier this week that the Georgia legislature and educators are considering a proposal by Apple to replace printed books, according to a report by Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

"Last week we met with Apple Computers," Williams said, "and they have a really promising program where they come in and their [sic] recommending to middle schools for $500 per child per year, they will furnish every child with an iPad, wi-fi the system, provide all the books on the system, all the upgrades, all the teacher training and the results theyre getting from these kids is phenomenal."

The senator added, "were currently spending about $40 million a year on books. And they last about seven years. We have books that dont even have 9/11. This is the way kids are learning, and we need to be willing to move in that direction.

Biggest thing since the overhead projector

A report by the New York Times last month described a pilot program at Roslyn High School on Long Island which started with 47 iPads. The school hopes to expand the program to include all of its 1,100 students.

It noted that the iPads "allow students to correspond with teachers and turn in papers and homework assignments, and preserve a record of student work in digital portfolios," citing teacher Larry Reiiff as saying, "It allows us to extend the classroom beyond these four walls."

The school described its initial purchase, which used 32GB iPads combined with a case and a stylus at a $750 each, was a part of an effort to go paperless and cut spending. In addition to just serving as electronic textbooks, the iPads are also described as running math games, being used to study world maps and interactive sky charting of constellations, and to simulate the keys of a piano.

Roslyn school superintendent Daniel Brenner said Apple's iPad would save money in the long run by reducing printing and textbook costs; estimating that the two iPad classes save $7,200 a year.

"I think this could very well be the biggest thing to hit school technology since the overhead projector," added school principal Scott Wolfe.

Schools around the country go iPad

The report stated that New York's public schools had ordered 2,000 iPads, 300 of which went to Kingsbridge International High School in the Bronx. It also noted that 200 public schools in Chicago have applied for iPad grants.

Apple points out that Chicago public schools, the third largest district in the US, are ecstatically supporting iPad as a learning tool. John Connolly, the technology director for Chicago Public Schools, states in a promotional video that "being able to outfit so many our kids with such a low cost machine could be a real advantage for our district."

The Virginia Department of Education is managing a $150,000 iPad initiative to replace history and Advanced placement biology textbooks at 11 of its schools.

The report also noted the Pinnacle Peak School in Scottsdale, Arizona, which "converted an empty classroom into a lab with 36 iPads named the iMaginarium," while the private Morristown-Beard School in New Jersey bought 60 iPads for $36,000 and is considering providing iPads to all students next fall.

A number of eduction initiatives related to iPad are taking advantage of President Obama's competitive Race to the Top program designed to back the best ideas in education with federal support.

There's an app for that

Apple lists about 5,400 eduction apps for iPad, about a thousand of which are free. Textbook publishers are eyeing the potential for moving their content to the digital world, enabling them to update material rapidly and include interactivity.

Six middle schools in San Francisco, Long Beach, Fresno and Riverside, California are now teaching the first iPad-only algebra course, developed by publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, which is studying the results of students using its digital program compared to those using conventional textbooks.

In addition to third party apps, Apple's iPad education page touts its own iWorks apps for iPad, which it says "help students and teachers put together professional-looking documents, presentations, and spreadsheets no matter where they are," and "when you finish what youve been working on, just tap the AirPrint icon to print it out directly from your iPad."

The company also highlights iTunes U, its listing of more than 350,000 free lectures, videos and other content from institutions including Yale, Stanford, UC Berkeley, Oxford, Cambridge, MIT, Beijing Open University and The University of Tokyo.

Critics complain that tablet-shaped devices using Android can be sold for $100 and supply basic ebook reader features. However, low priced ereaders are failing to rival iPad in the marketplace, with numbers from IDC indicating that Apple's iPad, starting at $500, continues to outsell low end ereader devices available for as little as $130.



post #2 of 160
Those poor children's eyes.
post #3 of 160
They can go with cheaper Android tablets with different sizes and features, it may last a few months before it breaks, which apps may or may not work on it.
post #4 of 160
"I couldn't do my homework because the battery for my school book was dead."

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post #5 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

"I couldn't do my homework because the battery for my school book was dead."

"My dog ate my iPad."
post #6 of 160
.

Deer Vally High School
Antioch, CA


Policy: Students can bring no electronic computing devices to the classroom.


Distance From Apple: 77.1 miles


Distance from reality: Ages

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post #7 of 160
Children, you all know that there are 12 broken iPads in our class. I have a solution - fund rising competition! Please take your envelops and bring them back tomorrow - with money! Whoever brings in the most money will get a brand new iPad! The losers will will be stack with these old scratched iPads. Good luck!
post #8 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

Those poor children's eyes.

No, those poor children's backs.
The amount of books they give out in Australian high schools is ridiculous.
They can't all fit in the locker, so have to be lugged home then to school next day. Which genius decided this ?
When I was at high school we hardly had any books.
I am all for the iPad, yes, there is an issue with looking at the screen for long durations, I don't have an answer for this.
post #9 of 160
This is indeed a revolution...

Apple began the introduction of IT in schools, and it's likely to to end it too.

Astounding. Just astounding.
post #10 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by serkol View Post

Children, you all know that there are 12 broken iPads in our class. I have a solution - fund rising competition! Please take your envelops and bring them back tomorrow - with money! Whoever brings in the most money will get a brand new iPad! The losers will will be stack with these old scratched iPads. Good luck!

Wow an Apple hater, love it when you guys crawl out from under your rocks to disparage anything Apple. The iPad is very robust compared to Laptops, especially Dell crap, made out of plastic, the Apple laptops will fare much better.
What about the crappy windoze pcs at all Australian schools that are either not working at all, takes 10 minutes to boot up, cannot get a network connection, crappy UI, even crappier software that one is forced to use? Yes my children suffer this on a daily basis, you know what ? Bring yourself or if you have them, your children so that they can enjoy/suffer the same experience. So before making fun of Apple products look at you own wonderful thingies, not so good are they ?
The iPad will do quite well much better than the traditional laptop/desktops, which are so 19th century, or should I say, the M$ century. We are now in the Apple century, I suggest you grow a brain.
post #11 of 160
kumbaya
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #12 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

"I couldn't do my homework because the battery for my school book was dead."

You get dropped a grade if you can't figure out how to plug in your 11 hour iPad.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #13 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon T View Post

This is indeed a revolution...

Apple began the introduction of IT in schools, and it's likely to to end it too.

Astounding. Just astounding.

They started it then it was hijacked by school administrators trying to save a buck here and there. I am afaid they will go for android or m$ crap, as it's cheaper, who cares if they work well or give joy to the children? Schools are all about saving money and silly me I thought they were about learning. Sigh ...
post #14 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

Those poor children's eyes.

The issue of eyestrain on a computer monitor is a myth that hasn't been true since the very early days of CRT screens. People who believe it's true however usually base it on "well, it happens to me," which is both subjective and un-provable so it continues to hang around and be believed.

Scientific tests have proven innumerable times that this just isn't true however. Eye strain is eye strain, it has nothing to do with computers vs. books per se. You can get eyestrain from reading in too dark an environment, or from squinting too much at a screen or from following rabidly moving action. In the bad old days you could get eyestrain from computer screens because the refresh rates on CRT's were very low and the sharpness wasn't very good either, leading people to lean in close to fuzzy screens with flickering electron beams, which of course caused eyestrain.

There is no evidence at all that computer screens (at least today's computer screens), as a category cause any more eyestrain than reading a paper book for the same amount of time under the same lighting conditions. What's happening is that people are selectively remembering the eyestrain caused by the "evil computer," but selectively forgetting the last time it happened when they were reading their favourite paper book.

It's a myth.
post #15 of 160
I am extremely skeptical about the potential uses of an iPad in a middle school classroom. These devices are extremely compelling with respect to sensory stimulation and physical input. The last thing a middle school student needs is another distraction.

I teach middle schoolers. They need to be stimulated and interested in their subject and in each other, not some silly device (however "magical") that will look like a doorstop before they graduate from high school. Think about it: Books were around when we were in school, and when our parents and their parents went to school. If too many are being hauled back and forth, solve that problem - don't introduce a different one. Bad books? Get good ones, preferably those unpolluted by criminally insane concepts such as intelligent design. Books aren't up to date? The lesson is that not all knowledge can be found inside a book. What if students never wondered what existed outside of their little touchscreen?

I am not some luddite or flippant apple hater as has been hinted at in the above comments. I love Macs and iOS as much as the next guy. However, we should always question the way we use tools and technology, including books, to educate our children. Children go to school not to learn facts or information - they go to school to learn how to learn from each other and directly from the world, not mitigated by a touchscreen and some programmer's idea of what is important. Can an iPad help them do this? Not in middle school. And after all, when they want to look up a "fact", iPads will still be around, as will books.
post #16 of 160
Education with iPads makes learning fun...maybe kids will love to learn again!
post #17 of 160
How about spending that money on some decent teachers. iPads aren't going to bring Georgia out of the bottom 10% in education in the U.S.
post #18 of 160
I suppose this is rather unlikely to happen. Far too many iHaters out there. It's always the excuse that it can be done A LOT cheaper using some Dell Streak 7. I'm surprised the damn cheapsters aren't trying to force the use of those crappy Windows netbooks because they're much, much cheaper. Don't give anyone what they want unless it's some Windows device.

If somebody asked the students what they wanted to use and they said they wanted to use iPads, some jackass will come along and say that Android tablets are cheaper and that's what we're giving you. That's some damn twisted force-feeding if you ask me. People talk about choice and yet they're trying to take choice away for something less expensive.
post #19 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by gabrielsolomon View Post

I am extremely skeptical about the potential uses of an iPad in a middle school classroom. These devices are extremely compelling with respect to sensory stimulation and physical input. The last thing a middle school student needs is another distraction.

I teach middle schoolers. They need to be stimulated and interested in their subject and in each other, not some silly device (however "magical") that will look like a doorstop before they graduate from high school. Think about it: Books were around when we were in school, and when our parents and their parents went to school. If too many are being hauled back and forth, solve that problem - don't introduce a different one. Bad books? Get good ones, preferably those unpolluted by criminally insane concepts such as intelligent design. Books aren't up to date? The lesson is that not all knowledge can be found inside a book. What if students never wondered what existed outside of their little touchscreen?

I am not some luddite or flippant apple hater as has been hinted at in the above comments. I love Macs and iOS as much as the next guy. However, we should always question the way we use tools and technology, including books, to educate our children. Children go to school not to learn facts or information - they go to school to learn how to learn from each other and directly from the world, not mitigated by a touchscreen and some programmer's idea of what is important. Can an iPad help them do this? Not in middle school. And after all, when they want to look up a "fact", iPads will still be around, as will books.

Whether or not children learn at school depends on these factors:

1. Parents.
2. Teachers.
3. Curriculum.

In that order. If the parents are educated and involved, the teachers are competent teachers and not repeaters, and the curriculum is factual instead of biased unreality, the kids stand a chance.

iPads are irrelevant to the learning process. They could simplify a childs organization, eliminate the insanity of carrying heavy books of which 6 pages are used, and remove the evil and unnecessary extortion known as the publishing of text books. Good things.

They are no more of a distraction than the pretty girl or handsome boy sitting next to you.

It staggers me how many "things" get blamed for poor education, when in reality it only comes down to the faults of the adults involved.

...and as far as your comment re: intelligent design. the only "criminally insane concept" being taught in school is the one that excludes critical thinking. If you've not taught students that the only thing in the world that matters is their ability to make up their own mind....then you haven't done your job at all.
post #20 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

"I couldn't do my homework because the battery for my school book was dead."

Don't you mean my Dog ate my iPad replacement battery ??
post #21 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by gabrielsolomon View Post

...

I am not some luddite or flippant apple hater as has been hinted at in the above comments. I love Macs and iOS as much as the next guy. However, we should always question the way we use tools and technology, including books, to educate our children. Children go to school not to learn facts or information - they go to school to learn how to learn from each other and directly from the world, not mitigated by a touchscreen and some programmer's idea of what is important. Can an iPad help them do this? Not in middle school. And after all, when they want to look up a "fact", iPads will still be around, as will books.

This is your first post. It is therefore an unimpeachable fact that no one was talking about you. Just like the nonsense you wrote about the "hints" above, virtually everything else you wrote is also nonsense:
  • Children are sent to school to learn from their teachers in a controlled environment, not from the World. Otherwise, we would send them to the farm field, factory floor, office tower, or into the street to form roving bands of feral youth.
  • The iPad touchscreen is not more limiting than the printed page and "some programmer's" judgement is no less valid than the arbitrary printer's.
  • There is much more to learning than looking-up facts. Personally, I revere books. However, up-to-the-minute, even up-to-the-second information is readily at hand on an iPad.
Make no mistake. My personal skepticism for technology is as healthy as my respect for its potential. The most important thing is the content, not the technology. We all know the limits of textbooks. This is why many textbooks today include a CD and/or links to online material. OTOH, the iPad is a newborn. Future versions will be more powerful with many more resources dedicated to them.
post #22 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

"I couldn't do my homework because the battery for my school book was dead."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wurm5150 View Post

"My dog ate my iPad."

"A hacker stole my lunch credits and my homework."

"A solar flare ate my homework"

"I was all set to do it when my iPad asked me if I wanted to play a game of Global Thermonuclear War. Do you have any idea how hard it is to track done a genius recluse on a remote island."

PS: What kind of asshat 'genius' makes a backdoor password to a military defense computer "Joshua", a 6-letter word found in a dictionary.
post #23 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by gabrielsolomon View Post

Children go to school not to learn facts or information - they go to school to learn how to learn from each other and directly from the world, not mitigated by a touchscreen and some programmer's idea of what is important.

You are absolutely right, and I'm also sick of books being some publishers idea of what is important.
post #24 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

Whether or not children learn at school depends on these factors:

1. Parents.
2. Teachers.
3. Curriculum.

In that order. If the parents are educated and involved, the teachers are competent teachers and not repeaters, and the curriculum is factual instead of biased unreality, the kids stand a chance.

iPads are irrelevant to the learning process. They could simplify a childs organization, eliminate the insanity of carrying heavy books of which 6 pages are used, and remove the evil and unnecessary extortion known as the publishing of text books. Good things.

They are no more of a distraction than the pretty girl or handsome boy sitting next to you.

It staggers me how many "things" get blamed for poor education, when in reality it only comes down to the faults of the adults involved.

...and as far as your comment re: intelligent design. the only "criminally insane concept" being taught in school is the one that excludes critical thinking. If you've not taught students that the only thing in the world that matters is their ability to make up their own mind....then you haven't done your job at all.


so many people with all the answers....easy to have answers...
post #25 of 160
That definitely makes sense, on many levels.... as long as quality content is available. Id wonder if it might be too soon for that.... but then I remember the quality of our US textbooks to begin with
post #26 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

The issue of eyestrain on a computer monitor is a myth

Umm, no. A paper book, even a glossy one, does not have the level of glare that a typical iPad has.

Moreover, numerous studies have shown that passively reflective surfaces & screens - like paper and Kindles - are much easier to read and can be read for longer durations with out fatigue than transmissive surfaces like the iPad.

Do a simple comparison. In a comfortable chair in a well lit room, read 10 pages of a novel from a book, a Kindle and an iPad and tell me which was the easiest? In fact, start with the iPad. Then tell me eyestrain on portable reading devices is a myth. I dare you. I double dare.

I'm a big fan of the iPad and I'm all for replacing books with readers - just not yet. I think the product needs to mature a bit, become easier on the eyes with crisper text and a anti glare screen optimized for static rather than moving images.

I also think that for most work, kids in school need a larger, "two page" iPad that is closer in size to the average open text book, and folds open like one.
post #27 of 160
Pros:
Let me say I think this is pretty cool and wish my school had this technology, but that was the 80's and all we had were cassette Walkman's, DOS PCs, or later a Mac Plus. It will save students and schools a lot of money and make learning more fun which will result in better learning and smarter kids at least that's the hope.

Cons:
Not to sound negative, but kids get beat-up and mugged for iPods and iPhones, what will happen to kids toting around a $500-600 iPad? What about inner-city (and suburban) kids getting robbed for one of these? It would be extremely negative and sad if down the road a story comes up of some kid being beaten or worse yet murdered for his/her iPad. Also, you can drop a book and no one cares - nothing happens, what if some kid drops their iPad and breaks it - who's responsible, who pays for it? Not every parent can afford to pay out hundreds of dollars to replace one.

I hope they come up with some guidelines, rules, and leniency for these and other very serious issues that may and likely will arise in time.

Good day.
post #28 of 160
i would guess that apple will provide some sort of kill switch to make the ipad unusable in the event it is stolen
post #29 of 160
The content is what is important not the delivery system.

Recently I took my commercial driver license test on a state computer at the Department of Motor Vehicles. I passed. If a state government and federal government requires people to take tests on computers then give them licenses then computers are here to stay. It is government validation of technology.

How soon will it be when someone can go from kindergarten through college and not need to carry books or take tests on paper? The technology exists now but when will the curriculum be ready?

When it does exist will governments let parents keep their children at home and just do all of their work on their iPads or other computers? Why shouldn't they? If teachers can monitor the work from afar then there would be no valid reason to do so.

Apps could be made to simulate mixing chemicals for chemistry classes. Apps could be made for almost anything.

I suppose teachers unions and universities would absolutely hate to give up their power to iPads. Right now with books they can claim that there is a need for more instruction. With iPads and great apps the students could see moving images and get greater detail from any type of lesson. Good apps are interactive.

When will the first accredited school come into existence that takes people from kindergarten to college degree online? I hope it is soon.
post #30 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

Whether or not children learn at school depends on these factors:

1. Parents.
2. Teachers.
3. Curriculum.

In that order. If the parents are educated and involved, the teachers are competent teachers and not repeaters, and the curriculum is factual instead of biased unreality, the kids stand a chance.

iPads are irrelevant to the learning process. They could simplify a childs organization, eliminate the insanity of carrying heavy books of which 6 pages are used, and remove the evil and unnecessary extortion known as the publishing of text books. Good things.

They are no more of a distraction than the pretty girl or handsome boy sitting next to you.

It staggers me how many "things" get blamed for poor education, when in reality it only comes down to the faults of the adults involved.

...and as far as your comment re: intelligent design. the only "criminally insane concept" being taught in school is the one that excludes critical thinking. If you've not taught students that the only thing in the world that matters is their ability to make up their own mind....then you haven't done your job at all.

Excellent retort. And masterful at that! I wish we have plenty of your kind in our schools.
post #31 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by NextTechnocrati View Post

Excellent retort. And masterful at that! I wish we have plenty of your kind in our schools.

No it wasn't - it was a silly, snarky comment that avoided the very valid points made by the original poster and was clearly submitted by someone who has never taught at a school.

To the original poster. This is a fun place to read rumors and baseless speculation presented as fact but I really wouldn't bother. (I wouldn't either but every now and again I come home a bit drunk and feel the need to try and hold a mirror up.)
post #32 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"I think this could very well be the biggest thing to hit school technology since the overhead projector," added school principal Scott Wolfe.

This means Al Davis will buy an iPad in 2015.
post #33 of 160
Genius! Genius I tell ya!

Instead of a kid chucking and kicking his unused textbook down the hall they can drop their iPads and kick them down the hall.
post #34 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

Whether or not children learn at school depends on these factors:

1. Parents.
2. Teachers.
3. Curriculum.

In that order. If the parents are educated and involved, the teachers are competent teachers and not repeaters, and the curriculum is factual instead of biased unreality, the kids stand a chance.

iPads are irrelevant to the learning process. They could simplify a childs organization, eliminate the insanity of carrying heavy books of which 6 pages are used, and remove the evil and unnecessary extortion known as the publishing of text books. Good things.

They are no more of a distraction than the pretty girl or handsome boy sitting next to you.

It staggers me how many "things" get blamed for poor education, when in reality it only comes down to the faults of the adults involved.

...and as far as your comment re: intelligent design. the only "criminally insane concept" being taught in school is the one that excludes critical thinking. If you've not taught students that the only thing in the world that matters is their ability to make up their own mind....then you haven't done your job at all.

This is exactly what I had growing up. I wouldn't have become a Mechanical Engineer without it.

I'll never forget back in '88 after my freshman year in the Pac 10 studying for Engineering and I went to my favorite chemistry teacher.

He introduced me to his class as his former bio/chem assistant, but more importantly to tell them how my class was the last class to have to solve chemistry problems with all your work. The State of Washington switched to multiple guess after '87.

His exams were more difficult than entry engineering level chemistry in the Pac 10. The next year the exams were creampuffs and the grades went down.
post #35 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by gabrielsolomon View Post

Think about it: Books were around when we were in school, and when our parents and their parents went to school. If too many are being hauled back and forth, solve that problem - don't introduce a different one. Bad books? Get good ones, preferably those unpolluted by criminally insane concepts such as intelligent design. Books aren't up to date? The lesson is that not all knowledge can be found inside a book. What if students never wondered what existed outside of their little touchscreen?

That thinking can no longer work in modern society, especially after MTV and Sesame Street have ripped any remaining attention span away. It's much harder for kids to focus, so they need to feel engaged with the material, otherwise their interest in the subject wanes and attention is focused elsewhere. Books will always remain a viable resource for reference material, but the days of being a useful teaching aide are over.

Of course the bigger issue here is the inability to focus. Unfortunately the damage has been done, so rather than wasting time trying "fix" it, these students still NEED to learn now, and if this helps, then good for it. To denounce something simply because it wasn't needed before or it's nontraditional is rather short-sighted.
Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
Reply
post #36 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

When it does exist will governments let parents keep their children at home and just do all of their work on their iPads or other computers? Why shouldn't they? If teachers can monitor the work from afar then there would be no valid reason to do so.

Apps could be made to simulate mixing chemicals for chemistry classes. Apps could be made for almost anything.

I suppose teachers unions and universities would absolutely hate to give up their power to iPads. Right now with books they can claim that there is a need for more instruction. With iPads and great apps the students could see moving images and get greater detail from any type of lesson. Good apps are interactive.

When will the first accredited school come into existence that takes people from kindergarten to college degree online? I hope it is soon.

Part of a person's education is learning to interact with people you might not otherwise choose to deal with - something you cannot achieve in a home setting. I've seen kids who were home-schooled in their early years and I have noted that many of them struggle socially.
post #37 of 160
I bet the day they started replacing the Slate with pencils and paper, people protested as well.
post #38 of 160
How do you go about deploying iPads into the school system across thousands (or even millions) of students?

How do you handle new app installations, app updates, security patches, iOS updates etc?

How do you lock them down, prevent app installation, app deletion, changes to settings, and make them less attractive to steal?

The iPad isn't the right kind of device for this type of deployment.

It could be changed to be more suited though.

Think about an "Enterprise" iPad. Same thing but with a hardware based encryption and administrative lock (so it can't simply be stolen and reflashed), centrally managed so new apps, app updates and iOS updates can app be pushed out OTA.
post #39 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by nassauboy View Post

I bet the day they started replacing the Slate with pencils and paper, people protested as well.

Investing more heavily into iPads for junior high students is not an intelligent use of funds. Making sure the kids actually are challenged and taught critical thinking is something neither a book nor an iPad can develop. That comes from home and the school.

You raise the standards and accept a portion of students won't reach it. Those students you offer a trades curriculum. Not everyone is destined to be a chemist, engineer, or other applied science degree, nor a lawyer, doctor, etc.

A lot of artists are poor students but their impact on Society is irrefutable. Bring back the trades with modern solutions that work in tandem and you get a competent work force to build that /(those) end-to-end solution/(s).

The Green Economy will need just as many machinists as the Industrial Revolution.
post #40 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLiver View Post

Those poor children's eyes.

Yes, actually reading for the first time in many cases. Get over it, this is great news for education.
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Long on AAPL so biased
Google Motto "You're not the customer. You're the product."
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