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Mac App Store hastens Apple's plans to cease boxed software sales - rumor - Page 2

post #41 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by deuxlavabo View Post

Hear, hear!

Just hope your reasoning doesn´t help cable companies to charge for bandwith, specially with OS distributions.
post #42 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

They need to somehow bring the family pack concept to the Mac App Store. Yes, you can "share" by authorizing computers via an iTunes account, but what about the situation where various family members have their own iTunes accounts and software needs, with some overlap in the latter. Of course, if the prices drop enough so that 5 purchases cost no more than a family pack would, then maybe that's a moot point.

This is my exact situation. I always buy the family packs for OS X,iLife, iWorks and MobileMe. 2 family members have their own iTunes accounts and use the family pack license.
post #43 of 105
It is unlikely that they intend to drop ALL boxed sales. It is more likely that they are only talking about their own titles. As more and more Macs are forced to upgrade to support iOS, more folks can buy Apple titles from MAS. They might kept online disk availability for a little while. And the big fat Studio titles might stay on disk for now. But things like iWork and iLife and the Express titles won't be cluttering shelves

And 3rd parties will likely still be able to buy shelf space if they wish. But it might be a smaller area and perhaps more costly

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #44 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timon View Post

The software I can live with but they need to keep the family pack or it's equivalent.

But what ever they do DON'T remove the optical drive from the larger systems, i.e., the MacBook Pro's, iMacs and Mac Pro's.

No problem with loosing the drive if they distribute OSX Lion and future systems on a pendrive.
post #45 of 105
I can see where this is going. Only one app download per machine. I am not going
To buy Lion 3 times.
post #46 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by djames4242 View Post

This only concern I've had with the Mac App store is how corporate (EPP) discounts would be handled. I asked someone at the Apple Store about this a few months ago and he didn't know, thought there would be some way to handle this whether it be a discount code used on the App Store or physical media still be sold through retail stores. Seeing the discount on Aperture alleviates some of this concern, although I doubt this sort of discount will be applied across the board. I currently get something like 26% off Apple software (I paid about $140 each for Final Cut Express and Aperture). I've been waiting to see if they discount Logic Express as much on the App Store as they have for Aperture (if so, I'll be buying immediately). If this is the case, then I've no worries at all about the elimination of EPP discounts for software...!
....

If they follow the same strategy for the Mac App Store that they use for the iOS App Store corporate purchasing will be through the roped off corporate/business area. Corporate customers would sign-in using their corporate account and see all the apps they can get, including multiple licenses I suppose.
post #47 of 105
Surprisingly they include two build to order MacBook Pro computers in stock. They have the highest end 15" with a matte screen and the high end 17" with the matte screen, both with hi-res which is std on the 17".

They do not have the 15" with hi-res and glossy glass display in the store.

I need reading glasses but I like the hi-res a LOT. Just can't decide between 15" and 17" yet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by djames4242 View Post

Bit off-topic here, but I'm eyeing the high-res 15" as a replacement for my (now-ancient) first-gen MBP and would love to see how the display compares to the standard resolution. From a bit of Googling it seems that the high-res display is a BTO option and, as such, not something Apple shows off in the stores. Were you able to find one on display?
post #48 of 105
I just don't see optical drives lasting much longer. Apple has already made the move away from them with the MBA.

Getting rid of the physical media is a good move, as far as I can tell. I'm behind this.

I also disagree with whomever it was that said "most of the country doesn't have broadband." Come on. Are you telling me that a majority of the people who are buying Pages off of the MacAppStore don't have broadband? Really?

It may be technically true that most of the country doesn't have broadband. But what % of the people in the country who own a Mac don't have broadband?
post #49 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewysBlackmore View Post

If they follow the same strategy for the Mac App Store that they use for the iOS App Store corporate purchasing will be through the roped off corporate/business area. Corporate customers would sign-in using their corporate account and see all the apps they can get, including multiple licenses I suppose.

Well said. One thing we should all have confidence in is Apple will make it easy to "spend" money!

Best
post #50 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post

Great idea but how with the App Store distribute OSX Lion? The only way that comes to mind is a physical DVD.

Not really. Although it is not as common for typical users, developers have always been able to download the complete OS which then you burn your onto own double-density DVD. So yeah, it is a little trickier but definitely doable.

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post #51 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

A new rumor suggests that Apple plans to cease all sales of boxed software at its retail stores, instead relying solely on digital distribution through the Mac App Store.

My bet - eventually a new user goes into the Apple store and purchases their Mac, sits down at ANY random Mac and is taught a little about how to use it - configures some settings and sets up their Apple ID (iTunes account) and buys their first apps.

Then they get home, open their Mac (with Lion OSX), enter their iTunes ID - and their new computer configures them exactly as they'd done in the Apple Store.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jb510 View Post

You still need a showcase space where people who come into the store can see what is available, and even better if they can try out some of the software in store. I'd like to see the "wall-o-boxes" replaced with an interactive display that let's one fire up a demo of any software.

No reason not to try the software in store. The interactive display is an interesting idea too.
post #52 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by dualie View Post

Physical media is a PITA frankly, and nearly everything is available for download these days. I do feel sorry for those who will lose their jobs because Apple stops making packaging materials.

I don't see this happening, at least not for some time. There are still people out there who won't want to setup an iTunes account & also eliminating boxed software will eliminate casual browsers who might pick up a software package just cause they were looking over them while waiting on the genius bar.
post #53 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I think they will "handle" Adobe and Microsoft by simply not carrying them in the store. Having them in the Apple store doesn't do anything for computer sales.

Except reassure Windows switchers who are still contemplating buying a Mac.
post #54 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timon View Post

The software I can live with but they need to keep the family pack or it's equivalent.

Did you know every app purchased from the Mac App Store is essentially a family pack? You can legally install and run it on any machine that you have an account on. And it isn't restricted to one user on each machine.
post #55 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by dualie View Post

Physical media is a PITA frankly, and nearly everything is available for download these days. I do feel sorry for those who will lose their jobs because Apple stops making packaging materials.

There are a lot of great comments in this thread, including this one.

I used to be a collector. I loved collecting DVD's and CD's. I loved the physical media, the sense of ownership, the art and design.

However, since the economy has tanked I've been forced to live far lighter. I've had to move several times in the past few years due to changing jobs from one side of the country to the other, and moving boxes of dvd's and cd's is impractical due to their bulk, weight, and fragility.

I now find that NetFlix on the iPad is awesome, but I just need to get all of my movie collection digitized and safely stored. I have certain applications that I depend on, but don't want to keep the originals anymore. The App Store pretty much guarantees that I'll be able to get to my apps.

I guess I feel better about needing a permanent high-bandwidth connection to the Internet than having a lot of waste generated and space taken up. Will the carbon footprint of a huge 24/7 datacenter be more impactful than paper mills and manufacturing facilities cranking out boxes and CDs? Time will tell.
post #56 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by xsylote View Post

with online purcases they will only increase profit. but they must go globally with it (so even i in bosnia can buy apple software) or leave boxed software for countries where they don't have app/itunes store.

You are still failing to make any sense. What I think you are trying to say, and I'm making a leap of logic here because you certainly haven't explained it, is that Apple's price tier and equivalency system on the App Stores is not advantageous to the consumer in some countries, and it makes App Store software more expensive than retail software in the same country.
post #57 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post

Great idea but how with the App Store distribute OSX Lion? The only way that comes to mind is a physical DVD.

OS, will have to remain physical, but I'm guessing they'll come on a USB key like Snow Leopard does for MacBook Air owners.
post #58 of 105
I disagree. Many people wouldn't buy a Mac without Microsoft or Adobe compatibility. The reality is most people don't buy Macs at the Apple Store. Those that do though, often times want to pick up the software as well.

Apple will likely keep some software in the Store. It isn't going to stop carrying titles like Office or Adobe Creative Suite. Apple wants to support those developers because it wants Adobe and Microsoft to keep making the software.

Further, Office and Adobe software doesn't satisfy Apple's criteria to be made available via the Apple Store. There'd need to be some rewriting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Great move.

I think they will "handle" Adobe and Microsoft by simply not carrying them in the store. Having them in the Apple store doesn't do anything for computer sales.
post #59 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gustav View Post

You are still failing to make any sense. What I think you are trying to say, and I'm making a leap of logic here because you certainly haven't explained it, is that Apple's price tier and equivalency system on the App Stores is not advantageous to the consumer in some countries, and it makes App Store software more expensive than retail software in the same country.

I think what the poster meant in his original post was that there is no Bosnia iTunes store or Mac App Store. The only way to purchase software is in boxes sold by third party retailers who have marked up the price to be prohibitively expensive. His desire is for Apple to globally offer the Mac App Store thus making software more reasonably priced in Bosnia.

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post #60 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdaddyp View Post

Hard Drive Dock $40-70
http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/Newer...ard_Drive_Dock

2 Tb hard drive $79
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822148413

Even adding a second hard drive, it is still cheaper per gigabyte then your disc's (unless my math is wrong-it can happen). Imho this is also far simpler and more convenient then messing around with individual dvd's. And while a hard drive can fail, disc's can get data rot.

Well you just sent me off on a 1/2 hour research adventure!

I currently own a USB-to-ATA cable-adapter vaguely similar to this: http://newertech.com/products/usb3_u...ldriveadap.php
It's not very convenient, but much easier than swapping drives between enclosures. Still, not something I'd want to use very often, more for when you're in a pinch.

But this Voyager dock looks pretty neat. Here are some thoughts, in case others care:

1) It's SATA only, so won't work with ATA/IDE drives. I was suspicious of this because I have stacks of older ATA drives around, and while the connectors are all the same, their positions are slightly different, depending on manufacturer.

2) The drive you listed above looks like a really great price, in fact it seems out of line with the rest of what I saw for 2g drives (and the reviews were pretty bad, lots of DOA/early failures). This is only based on a short bit of research, but I think I'd opt for a better quality drive, which pushes the price up.

3) disc rot vs. hard disk failure. This is a good point, maybe someone else wants to research into it more. In any case, I save each set of data to 2 DVDs of different brands to reduce risk of one brand or batch being crappy. But the main point here is that if a disc rots you lose one chunk of data, if a drive fails, you potentially lose many many times that amount of data. Or you pay a $1500+ fee to recover what is recoverable. That's scary to me.

4) Cost. Let's say for ballpark $100 for 2g bare drive (I'm actually seeing most drives higher than that, but haven't looked deeply at reliability, etc). I can get a spindle of 100 DVD-Rs for about $20 (less for cheap no-name, a bit more for name-brand). That's like $4/gig compared with $50/gig using hard drives. So yeah, your math was off by a factor of 10, but that's okay. :-)

5) Redundancy. Double all the costs for redundancy. As mentioned, I make 2 copies (occasionally 3 for some data) on different brand media, one copy for off-site.

6) Convenience. One might think the drives are more convenient, but we already have much of this data on a couple large external drives for ready-access (although they're close to full now!), but this is all about archival. Storing stuff that we want to be sure it's around for decades to come, even if the house or office burns down.

All this said, it was a good exercise in checking out what looks like a pretty neat product, and I thank you for pointing it out. Even if it's not something we choose to use for this particular application, I'm happy to know about it.

Anyone else have thoughts on large-ish scale backup if and when optical drives start disappearing?
No Matte == No Sale :-(
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post #61 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

All? How are they going to sell and install Mac OS X software? Hopefully they can figure out how to make 8GB USB flash drives for Mac OS X Lion cheap enough, but that is still a partition.

MacBook Air's already come with a thumb drive for re-installing.
post #62 of 105
Also, FWIW, it will be a nuisance for some people if Apple stops selling (most) software in their stores, but a show-stopper for many people if (no, when) they stop including optical drives on mainstream machines.

People like to shop in-person, it's just reality. Many people (granted, not everyone) like to hold something in their hands as they buy it. And there are other independent retail stores beyond the corporate stores, so even if Apple decides to severely cut back in-store software purchases, there are other options. But removing optical drives kills that option as well!

Some of you might think that 20-something consumers rule the roost, but the bulk of money spent in this country, even on tech, is spent by people who are older and with habits and personalities that aren't going to change just because someone tells them they should.
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post #63 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

All? How are they going to sell and install Mac OS X software? Hopefully they can figure out how to make 8GB USB flash drives for Mac OS X Lion cheap enough, but that is still a partition.

The latest MacBook Airs ship with the System Restore "disc" on a flash memory module.
post #64 of 105
Just wondering how long it will take to donwload Lion for example. It takes an hour or so to get the iOS updates. I see this as a huge issue for people. With slower connections one could be tied up for hours downloading major software and then have it time out etc.
post #65 of 105
Quote:
Though major software options like Microsoft Office are not yet available for download, Apple has made much of its most popular software, including the iWork and iLife suites, available for purchase.

Well, Office and Adobe ARE available for download, just not from the Mac App Store.

You can download them from the Adobe and Microsoft sites.
post #66 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Several people have pointed out that it's something that customers would want to get in their store (Office), but I think you're looking at it wrong when you talk about how popular it is. As the main article tells us, even if it was at the top of the list, the total amount of sales is minimal in dollars and cents. The only reason to keep it is for the customer assurance, not the money or the sales.

That being said, I know Microsoft has talked (and talked and talked) about delivering their software online for many years and I remember reading articles from five years ago that talked about it being just around the corner. Now that Apple has beaten them to it (again!), I would expect that even if they aren't in the Mac app store, they will find some way to offer it online.

So perhaps Apple would hand out the link to people, perhaps they would let people download it right in the store, maybe they would set it up for them, but I don't see it as a really big hurdle and I don't see them removing all the software boxes for their own products, yet leaving MS Office on the shelf all by itself.

At my workplace, we buy a blanket licence for the whole place and people individually download it to their computers from a central server. We haven't used disks for a long long time. I think there must be some way to accommodate the Office users even if it's just selling them a coupon with a keycode and a URL to download on it.

Microsoft offers its own software via download or CD through its own online store.

And if you are buying for the corporate world the Volume licensing and MSDN subscription plans offer exactly what you are describing and have done for years.

They also have programs such as the Home Use Program which offers employees the same software available at their work for next to nothing, e.g. MS Office for AUD$15.
post #67 of 105
I have owned Apples since the Apple II back in 1980. I live in the mountains of Colorado and only have dial up at 32Kps for internet access. My only source for Apple software upgrades is via DVD. The day Apple stops producing DVDs as a way to purchase software for the Mac is the day I quit Apple and go Windows.
post #68 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade46 View Post

I have owned Apples since the Apple II back in 1980. I live in the mountains of Colorado and only have dial up at 32Kps for internet access. My only source for Apple software upgrades is via DVD. The day Apple stops producing DVDs as a way to purchase software for the Mac is the day I quit Apple and go Windows.

I hear your passion...but I'd prefer using an old Apple rather than a new Windows pox, err I mean, "box."
post #69 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post

Great idea but how with the App Store distribute OSX Lion? The only way that comes to mind is a physical DVD.

Maybe SD cards? Apple already has the slots/readers on 7 of 11 Mac models right now.

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post #70 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

All? How are they going to sell and install Mac OS X software? Hopefully they can figure out how to make 8GB USB flash drives for Mac OS X Lion cheap enough, but that is still a partition.

There is another option that would eliminate physical media for rich OS updates altogether, but thats probably still too involved and complex for Apple to pursue at this time.


To be clear, MS Office and Adobe products are available for DL, just not through the Mac App Store. If Apple isnt make much money on those suites as it is it might behoove them to eliminate them altogether. How many are buying these apps at Apple Stores and apple.com anyway?

Yeah I downloaded MS Office 11 (only cos I got it for £9 on employee purchase!) Some of the combo updates are close to 1GB nowadays so downloading the new OS X probably wouldn't be vastly different. But it sucks having to repeat the process for all the Macs in the house.

When's Apple coming out with the seamless home server product - we've all got two or three Macs at home nowadays and need to keep all of them in check.

Quote:
Originally Posted by macdaddykane View Post

Not at all concerned about reducing packing material manufacturing, burning up trees and oil to make wasteful paper and plastics. Industry evolves and workers need to as well.

+1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

Why would you want to keep something so large, so slow, so limited and so unused in 2011 compared to the internet and other forms of data transfers? If people need an optical drive on a notebook they can buy one that has it like people did in the past when technology made the inevitable change over or use an external one for the few times they need it, but why should everyone else suffer for it? Somehere has posted an x-ray pic of a MacBook Pro with the optical drive taking up 25% of the entire internal space. Thats a lot!

Quote:
Originally Posted by rbonner View Post

What happens to folks still with Tiger or Leopard, is there app store in those releases now?

You download software, just not from the Mac App Store.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post

Great idea but how with the App Store distribute OSX Lion? The only way that comes to mind is a physical DVD.

As others have said OS X is on a USB stick for MBA use. Personally I've been expecting this since pre-Leopard given that Apple owns the world supply of flash memory anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post

Just hope your reasoning doesn´t help cable companies to charge for bandwith, specially with OS distributions.

With our other usage, Netflix, iPlayer etc, OS updates will be only a small percentage but I hope Apple can optimize this as the networks are overloaded as it is.
post #71 of 105
Good. Many of their boxes are out of date anyway
post #72 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by hasmit View Post

Good. Many of their boxes are out of date anyway

Care to elaborate?

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post #73 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by xsylote View Post

...i live in bosnia and herzegovina...

Welcome to the lively Apple Insider comments forum! Here's hoping that digital distribution comes to your area soon.
post #74 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Care to elaborate?

Sure. e.g., I recently purchased the boxed sw pkg DiskWarrior at the Apple Store in Cincinnati.

The system on the disk won't even start my Dec 2009 iMac 27" i7 because it is not up to date. This kind of service is unacceptable for a boxed sw vendor (especially the hw vendor) to foist upon its customers.
post #75 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

Well you just sent me off on a 1/2 hour research adventure!

I currently own a USB-to-ATA cable-adapter vaguely similar to this: http://newertech.com/products/usb3_u...ldriveadap.php
It's not very convenient, but much easier than swapping drives between enclosures. Still, not something I'd want to use very often, more for when you're in a pinch.

But this Voyager dock looks pretty neat. Here are some thoughts, in case others care:

1) It's SATA only, so won't work with ATA/IDE drives. I was suspicious of this because I have stacks of older ATA drives around, and while the connectors are all the same, their positions are slightly different, depending on manufacturer.

2) The drive you listed above looks like a really great price, in fact it seems out of line with the rest of what I saw for 2g drives (and the reviews were pretty bad, lots of DOA/early failures). This is only based on a short bit of research, but I think I'd opt for a better quality drive, which pushes the price up.

3) disc rot vs. hard disk failure. This is a good point, maybe someone else wants to research into it more. In any case, I save each set of data to 2 DVDs of different brands to reduce risk of one brand or batch being crappy. But the main point here is that if a disc rots you lose one chunk of data, if a drive fails, you potentially lose many many times that amount of data. Or you pay a $1500+ fee to recover what is recoverable. That's scary to me.

4) Cost. Let's say for ballpark $100 for 2g bare drive (I'm actually seeing most drives higher than that, but haven't looked deeply at reliability, etc). I can get a spindle of 100 DVD-Rs for about $20 (less for cheap no-name, a bit more for name-brand). That's like $4/gig compared with $50/gig using hard drives. So yeah, your math was off by a factor of 10, but that's okay. :-)

5) Redundancy. Double all the costs for redundancy. As mentioned, I make 2 copies (occasionally 3 for some data) on different brand media, one copy for off-site.

6) Convenience. One might think the drives are more convenient, but we already have much of this data on a couple large external drives for ready-access (although they're close to full now!), but this is all about archival. Storing stuff that we want to be sure it's around for decades to come, even if the house or office burns down.

All this said, it was a good exercise in checking out what looks like a pretty neat product, and I thank you for pointing it out. Even if it's not something we choose to use for this particular application, I'm happy to know about it.

Anyone else have thoughts on large-ish scale backup if and when optical drives start disappearing?

That was a quickie list I threw together, that drive was the first one that came up on Newegg. I personally prefer to buy boxed(retail packaging) drives over a bare oem. Now if you are patient you can find 1tb-1.5tb boxed drives on sale that the price per gigabyte is close to the one I listed. For back up drives I have no problem using green drives (slower rotation and performance) as they are cheaper and use less power.

To my way of thinking if you have more then one or two drives then the price of the hot swap enclosure becomes moot, but maybe thats just me.

100 disks for $20. So that works out to be 100x4.3Gb=430Gb $20/430Gb=.0465 per Gb.

Using a better rated drive on new egg (4 out 5 eggs) it's a 2 Tb Western Digital green for $99.
That is $99/2000Gb=$.0495
So the cost per gigabyte is very similar even though buying two drives (one for back up and one for off site storage) does make you spend more up front.
Lets add the one time cost of an Newertech usb hard drive dock of 34.99.
$34.99+$99=$133.99/2000Gb=.066996 Gb.

That is pretty close to the price you pay for the disks, and drives are only getting cheaper. I have no problem if you prefer dvd's. I just find using hard drives so much easier and convenient with virtually no cost penalty.

Also, I am pretty sure I saw somewhere an older style dock that works with ide drives. Perhaps dig around on Newegg.
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post #76 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewysBlackmore View Post

Anyone else have thoughts on large-ish scale backup if and when optical drives start disappearing?

For on-site backup, a RAID array or something more flexible like a Drobo is the way to go. For off-site storage, you could use a HD dock with drives you rotate for redundancy, but that's a huge hassle. I know you poo-pooed this earlier, but online backup like Carbonite or Mozy.
post #77 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logisticaldron View Post

All? How are they going to sell and install Mac OS X software? Hopefully they can figure out how to make 8GB USB flash drives for Mac OS X Lion cheap enough, but that is still a partition.

There is another option that would eliminate physical media for rich OS updates altogether, but thats probably still too involved and complex for Apple to pursue at this time.


To be clear, MS Office and Adobe products are available for DL, just not through the Mac App Store. If Apple isnt make much money on those suites as it is it might behoove them to eliminate them altogether. How many are buying these apps at Apple Stores and apple.com anyway?

Snow Leopard came on a USB flash drive with my Macbook air
post #78 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

They already are. My new MBA came with OSX on a USB stick.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac.World View Post

MacBook Air's already come with a thumb drive for re-installing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vandil View Post

The latest MacBook Airs ship with the System Restore "disc" on a flash memory module.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atanner View Post

Snow Leopard came on a USB flash drive with my Macbook air

I guess my post was a bit confusing. I thought my comment about cheap enough and mentioning the 8GB NAND used in the MBAs was self evident.

Regarding cheap enough, consider the differences you guys are stating as one and the same. Including a physical restore disc in a Mac that starts at $999 and sells a million or so per quarter is vastly different than creating several times as many of this USB flash drives that are sold for much less money. Apple includes iLife with the cost of a Mac but any of the software updates they charge for it, so its not likely Apple will sell an 8GB USB flash drive with Mac OS X Lion for $29. Thats the difference.

I think its likely theyll offer USB Flash drive for Lion (they have to for the MBAs that ship with Snow Leopard), but also have the standard DVD installer for the majority of Mac users who still have DVD drives. Youll be able to pay the premium for the faster, smaller, and cooler option, but itll likely cost more. By Mac OS X 10.8 it will all be on USB.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mrtotes View Post

Yeah I downloaded MS Office 11 (only cos I got it for £9 on employee purchase!) Some of the combo updates are close to 1GB nowadays so downloading the new OS X probably wouldn't be vastly different. But it sucks having to repeat the process for all the Macs in the house.

One of the more obvious issues with doing a download-only OS update that rewrites all the system files are the checks and balances to prevent something from going wrong, and the ability for a backup plan if something does go wrong. Theyd need to check the entire file after its downloaded. Not an issue. Theyd have to allow the installer app to first setup a partition for the system files to reside with a dynamic partition resizing. This can often be done very easily, if youre not using too much of your drive and the system cant resize to make that partition. They can also have it say you need a different drive, allow you to copy it to an external harddrive, USB flash drive, SD card, etc. That partition needs to have its own checks that it will be a solid boot partition and have all the apps one might need to fix any issues.

Like I said, all possible, but not as likely as Apple having customers pay $5-8 more for a USB flash drive for the updater.


Quote:
When's Apple coming out with the seamless home server product - we've all got two or three Macs at home nowadays and need to keep all of them in check.

That would be sweet. Time Capsule just doesnt cut it for an interconnected home. iOS-based and multiple hot-swapple drives.
post #79 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade46 View Post

I have owned Apples since the Apple II back in 1980. I live in the mountains of Colorado and only have dial up at 32Kps for internet access. My only source for Apple software upgrades is via DVD. The day Apple stops producing DVDs as a way to purchase software for the Mac is the day I quit Apple and go Windows.

Well, I regret to say it, but I think eventually boxing will be scarce even in windows, it is the trend

George
post #80 of 105
What would this mean for business that use disk images for setting up Macs? Would every Mac in the company need to be registered on iTunes?
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