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Nokia's rejection of Android may help resolve patent war with Apple

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
Nokia's decision to partnership with Microsoft rather than adopt Google's Android may ease patent negotiations between the company and Apple, which is more likely to support strengthening weak rivals rather than empowering an already ubiquitous one.

A report by Florian Mueller of FOSS Patents notes Nokia's patents are one of the company's strongest assets; resolving its complaint with Apple quickly may give it a better opportunity extinguish its "burning platform" and get back to business.

"In his presentation to investors, Nokia CEO Stephen Elop said that they have 'one of the strongest patent portfolios out there,'" Mueller wrote, "and they are willing to license it to others 'at an appropriate royalty rate.' This translates as stepping up their outbound licensing efforts."

Nokia and Apple are currently embroiled in a series of patent disputes, with Nokia accusing Apple of refusing to pay royalties for its use of technology standards that involve Nokia's intellectual property (including WiFi, GSM and 3G).

Apple counters that Nokia is demanding an unfair premium for patents which the company has previously promised to offer under fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory (F/RAND) terms, and adds that Nokia is infringing upon its iPhone-specific patents, which were never pledged to be offered under F/RAND terms as part of an open standard.

One reason why Nokia rejected Android: patents

In contrast, Google has a weak footing in patents, with a much smaller patent portfolio than other players in the smartphone business. That will prevent Google from being able to resolve patent disputes through cross licensing, because it doesn't have much to offer in trade.

Google's Android is a lawsuit magnet, with already a dozen disputes noted by Mueller. This includes Apple's suits against Motorola and HTC, Microsoft's suit against Motorola, Oracle vs Google, a variety of other companies suing Google and its licensees, and even licensees suing each other, such as the case between Sony and LG.

In addition to being in a weak position itself, Google is not stepping in to support is Android licensees as they come under attack. Instead, it's piling on more controversy by pushing WebM, another technology with a patent target painted on its back but no indemnity protection offered by Google.

What Microsoft offers Nokia with Windows Phone 7

"The partnership between Nokia and Microsoft should make it much easier for Apple and Nokia to work things out between them and strike a cross-license deal," Mueller wrote, adding that Apple would be unlikely to file suit against Microsoft, given that the two are also partners (in the area of Exchange Server particularly) and have already resolved their differences in a series of cross licensing agreements.

Further, the patents Apple is now asserting against Nokia largely relate to touchscreen interfaces. A partnership with Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 could allow Nokia to move forward without infringing upon Apple's patents, or could involve a new cross-licensing agreement where Microsoft served as a moderating factor.

Thirdly, Mueller notes that "in light of market dynamics, it would now make a whole lot of sense for Apple and Nokia to stop wasting resources on their fight with each other and instead focus on license deals with all those makers of Android-based devices."

Apple likely to view WP7 as a minor threat

Apple's patent dispute with Nokia has dragged on because the iPhone maker does not want to hand its proprietary iPhone inventions to the world's mobile maker simply to gain unfairly priced access to royalties related to network standards that it believes should be available at F/RAND terms without such concessions. The most idea resolution for both companies would be for Nokia to adopt Windows Phone 7 for its high end smartphone business.

Apple likely sees little threat from WP7, given Microsoft's failed launch last fall, with nearly nonexistent demand from consumers and even a feeble showing from developers.

Android, on the other hand, exerts a plausible threat to Apple because even though Google has far less experience in managing a development platform than Microsoft, the software can be picked up for free for use by cloners to flood the market with knockoff goods.

One rapidly growing Android licensee, the Chinese maker Huawei, is being sued for refusing to pay standard licensing fees managed by Helferich Patent Licensing, a group that represents the patent interests of Apple, Microsoft, HTC and more than twenty other companies. Apple (and other companies) would clearly prefer to deal with companies that play by the rules rather than chasing foreign Android licensees through the courts, particularly ones doing business in countries that don't respect intellectual property rights.

Once Nokia and Microsoft begin to collaborate on new WP7 phones, the supply of such devices will be relatively small, because Nokia's current smartphone business is largely made up of handsets incapable of running a full screen system on the order of WP7 or Apple's iOS. Most of Nokia's "smartphones" would be easily confused with other makers' feature phones, sporting small screens and simple, button-oriented interfaces.

Nokia converting its relatively meager high end phones to WP7 is a far better situation for Apple than were the world's largest phone maker to embrace Android and begin converting its large piece of the overall smartphone market into Android market share.

Nokia's WP7 deal creates an Android competitor for Apple

An amicable patent cross licensing agreement between Nokia and Apple would allow Apple to continue expanding its iOS business and allow Nokia to move forward with plans to stabilize its huge, broad market for simple Symbian models on one hand (to be managed under the newly created Mobile Phones unit) while it also experiments with MeeGo and Symbian and works to transition toward new WP7 models on the other (within a separate unit to be named Smart Devices).

So, rather than simply pushing Nokia's roughly 38 percent share of the smartphone market into Microsoft's column, as some have imagined, Nokia will continue to build a broad range of cheap "smartphones" based on Symbian for sale in emerging markets, and divert only its poor showing on the high end to Microsoft's new platform. Nokia's high end smartphone business was passed by Apple a long time ago.

At the same time, Nokia will breathe some credibility into Microsoft's WP7 platform, giving carriers and their customers more choices among the next generation of modern smartphones: WP7, HP's webOS, RIM BlackBerry, Android, and Apple's iOS.

The problem for Nokia is that it is partnering with what is the biggest failure in smartphones; WP7 has nosedived at launch, despite upbeat-sounding reviews and the marketing strength Microsoft pushed behind it. LG, its biggest licensee, described the platform as 'a bit boring' and suggested it might find a following among low end users with simple needs. That's not really what Nokia wants to do with its high end smartphones.

The problem for Microsoft is that it is partnering with the failed end of Nokia. While the largest phone maker globally, Nokia's efforts to launch a modern smartphone have been scattered and incomplete. It describes is N900 pocket computer smartphone as an experiment, while its flagship iPhone competitors have failed to see the same demand as Apple, particularly in the US where Nokia recently canceled its X7 launch.

Nokia's existing smartphone business is broad but short in profits per phone, as depicted in a report by Asymco.

post #2 of 31
Quote:
Nokia's existing smartphone business is broad but short in profits per phone

Yep, and now they get to pay the Microsoft tax out of those slim margins, making them even slimmer. Not to mention competing with the other Windows Phone clone makers in a race to the bottom pricing.
post #3 of 31
Ah Yes! I've been really hoping AI would update us a bit more on the patent wars.

I'm hoping for an article update on multi-touch (fingerworks) patent lawsuits sometime soon!
post #4 of 31
Finally an analysis who has somewhat of a clue
post #5 of 31
Someone needs to do some proofreading...

-=|Mgkwho
post #6 of 31
It might have far more to do with existing technology-sharing agreements between Microsoft and Apple than the strengthening of a weak opponent.
post #7 of 31
Quote:
The problem for Nokia is that it is partnering with what is the biggest failure in smartphones; WP7 has nosedived at launch, despite upbeat-sounding reviews and the marketing strength Microsoft pushed behind it.

Really?

I think I saw a few WP7 commercials and have never seen a print ad. The biggest obstacle (in the US) to get people to adopt ANY platform, is the carriers, who pick and choose what they are willing to offer to customers.

Right now, the iPhone is at the top of carrier's list.
Second is Android.
Third, RIM
Then everyone else, including Microsoft and Nokia.

In the US market, either Microsoft or Nokia, or both will have to make deals with the carriers to push their platform. Otherwise, it'll never take off here. As far as the rest of the world... not sure if Nokia was synonymous with Symbian or not, so we'll have to see which begat loyalty.
Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
Reply
post #8 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post

Really?

I think I saw a few WP& commercials and have never seen a print ad. The biggest obstacle (in the US) to get people to adopt ANY platform, is the carriers, who pick and choose what they are willing to offer to customers.

You must not be the demographic MS targeted in its $500 million ad campaign for WP7.

Apple has a smaller ad budget than MS, but it leverages the media a lot better. And these days, everyone is advertising iPhone for it, from broadcasters to competitors (Creative, Real, and now Motorola).
post #9 of 31
Why would they choose a microsoft "paid" license instead of the superior free google android OS?
post #10 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullhead View Post

Yep, and now they get to pay the Microsoft tax out of those slim margins, making them even slimmer. Not to mention competing with the other Windows Phone clone makers in a race to the bottom pricing.

Not necessarily. We don't know what the deal is. An exclusivity deal could mean Microsoft gave up license fees hoping to making it up in ad revenue. If they felt the potential was there to subsidize the initial costs. Besides, Microsoft doesn't need the money... the spent billions pushing XBox on the market.

Second, they will no longer need the developers and all those R&D funds. That'll take a lot off the top. They can keep just enough developers to create customized services on top of WP7 and will no longer need to invest in future platforms.
Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
Reply
Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
Reply
post #11 of 31
Sorry Motorola and HTC is patents have nothing to do with Android... But Oracle does. But lets be serious Apple and Google know that these arguments go no where and really the fact that this is constantly reported on just about every website is just plain stupid. Remember how HTC wanted all iphones to be removed from the US because of some stupid patents.... things got settled (because one sewed the other one i do believe...) Oracle and Google will solve this problem with google just giving a ton of money to Oracle probably or Oracle will loose because the recent evidence has been proven useless...
The real reason Nokia chose Microsoft is because they are buds... (formet microsoft is head of american sales of Nokia) I mean its really that simple. Nokia is dying and will continue to die even if they did pick Android. Microsoft got a great deal and Nokia got owned.
Look at the phones nokia have released they are way behind the iPhone 4! heres a great article that will help people better understand the situation.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/0..._n_822149.html
post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetim View Post

Why would they choose a microsoft "paid" license instead of the superior free google android OS?

Because choosing android would be like the finnish boy who pissed in his pants for warmth.

Seriously, choosing Android OS make you a commodity hardware vendor with little to distinguish yourself from the competition. And as just one of the many vendors, you wouldn't get any attention from Google regarding your own concerns.
post #13 of 31
That will be cheaper then defending Android related patent suits. I, however, think Nokia has made a mistake. Apple's strength is the tight integration of the OS and hardware. HP will share the same strength (although it might ultimately not execute well) with WebOS. Nokia now has to rely on Microsoft for updates. Further, it will have little say in the direction of the OS, and Microsoft is already behind Apple in terms of creating a full featured phone OS.

Apple products demand a premium because Apple controls the quality across the board. I think the move is good for Apple though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bullhead View Post

Yep, and now they get to pay the Microsoft tax out of those slim margins, making them even slimmer. Not to mention competing with the other Windows Phone clone makers in a race to the bottom pricing.
post #14 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullhead View Post

Yep, and now they get to pay the Microsoft tax out of those slim margins

If NOKIA adopted Android Microsoft would be speaking with them as well. Don't forget every HTC pays Microsoft money for every Android phone they ship.
post #15 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetim View Post

Why would they choose a microsoft "paid" license instead of the superior free google android OS?

2 reasons off the top of my head (was going to write more but can't be bothered)

- Its an awesome platform. They may be last but they've learnt from everyone elses mistakes. Its not fully featured yet, but it does a lot of very simple things a lot better. A bit like when ipods paused your music when you took the headphones out. Not worth advertising but a sign of quality.
- Clear roadmaps. One minute googles producing the os, then thee own phone. MS tends to keep people well informed.
-
post #16 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post

Not necessarily. We don't know what the deal is. An exclusivity deal could mean Microsoft gave up license fees hoping to making it up in ad revenue. If they felt the potential was there to subsidize the initial costs. Besides, Microsoft doesn't need the money... the spent billions pushing XBox on the market.

Second, they will no longer need the developers and all those R&D funds. That'll take a lot off the top. They can keep just enough developers to create customized services on top of WP7 and will no longer need to invest in future platforms.

They're paying license fees estimated as being from $10 - $20 per phone, which is one reason why Nokia's stock has been pounded as much as it has been the last two days. Down about 8% on Thursday, and about 14% today.
post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

That will be cheaper then defending Android related patent suits. I, however, think Nokia has made a mistake. Apple's strength is the tight integration of the OS and hardware. HP will share the same strength (although it might ultimately not execute well) with WebOS. Nokia now has to rely on Microsoft for updates. Further, it will have little say in the direction of the OS, and Microsoft is already behind Apple in terms of creating a full featured phone OS.

Apple products demand a premium because Apple controls the quality across the board. I think the move is good for Apple though.

I doubt that patent disputes over Android was a big factor here. Likely it was some consideration, but not a big one.
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by timgriff84 View Post

2 reasons off the top of my head (was going to write more but can't be bothered)

- Its an awesome platform. They may be last but they've learnt from everyone elses mistakes. Its not fully featured yet, but it does a lot of very simple things a lot better. A bit like when ipods paused your music when you took the headphones out. Not worth advertising but a sign of quality.
- Clear roadmaps. One minute googles producing the os, then thee own phone. MS tends to keep people well informed.
-

It's not an awesome platform. It's a decent platform, which is why it hasn't taken off.
post #19 of 31
I think in the end (well it's never the end but in the near future) in a few years it will be an apple and windows mobile market. Not becuse WP7 is great now but becuse MS now has a reliable partner that will make dedicated hardware for them and if Nokia can tough it out it will get much better. MS has a history of sticking things out and evolving them despite losing money for years in the process just to get market share. e.g. Xbox.

MS is actually in a good position right now. They are financially healthy. The negative press about them has died down considerably the last couple years and windows 7 is doing well and has finally reached the status of a decent operating system. Google has even replaced them as the new Dr. Evil.

Nokia on the other hand is in world of hurt. When your business is to sell phones and you can't make one anyone wants to buy and don't have a roadmap that gets you a phone that people will buy you are pretty much open to anything that comes along. But Nokia does know phones. They have a huge patent portfolio and lots of loyal dedicated customers around the world. It wil be a rough couple of years but if they stick it out they will be the de-facto Windows Phone provider and will help slowly increase its market share.

Android will not weather the storm. I know everyone thinks I'm crazy but it has no roots or reason to stick around. Manufacturers don't have any motivation to support it after they ship it. There is massive fragmentation among devices and versions. No huge installed base of paid apps that will keep users loyal to phones the run Android. Basically they have become expensive feature phones that get replaced at the end of the contract with the next one in the line up.

The thing that keeps me tied to my iPhone and pretty much insures my next phone will be an iPhone too is that I can keep using my apps. A few hundred dollars in apps is a huge investment to have to throw away just to gain a few new features in a new platform. It's not just the apps, its the content and settings and just comfort feeling I get using them. Eventually MS/Nokia will be able to do what google can't - control their ecosystem. By building an app store that they can control and providing stable long supported phones that can run those apps they can effectively create a virtual lock-in for their customers. It won't happen today but in time MS will do what MS does well... and in its borg like style it will consume a huge chunk of the mobile market. Nokia is actually lucky enough to get to come along for the ride.
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by columbus View Post

If NOKIA adopted Android Microsoft would be speaking with them as well. Don't forget every HTC pays Microsoft money for every Android phone they ship.

Not necessarily. Nokia may already have a license in place for their patents. The patents in question are broad and apply to any phone OS, like the patent on the FAT file system and patents dealing with contacts, email.

Of course if Nokia wanted to they could send Microsoft into the stone age with their portfolio. Unlike HTC Motorola doesn't need to be nice to Microsoft since they ditched WinMob a long time ago.
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by xsu View Post

Seriously, choosing Android OS make you a commodity hardware vendor with little to distinguish yourself from the competition. And as just one of the many vendors, you wouldn't get any attention from Google regarding your own concerns.

You do realize by choosing Windows Phone 7 they have little to distinguish themselves from the competition? They are just a clone maker now who has to pay the Microsoft tax like the other cloners.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by columbus View Post

If NOKIA adopted Android Microsoft would be speaking with them as well. Don't forget every HTC pays Microsoft money for every Android phone they ship.

Don't forgot Nokia has a very large patent portfolio...they could sue Microsoft into oblivion.
post #23 of 31
I dunno about you guys but I'm king of exited about this for some reason. Not that I expect WP7 to be successful, but it creates a brighter image in my head then android. Maybe it's the recent hate between apple and google, maybe its the cockiness of google lately, but a Windows Phone 7 Nokia is a lot more appealing to me right now then an android device. Especially with Nokia's maps integrated, it should be pretty good.

PS Speaking of maps, apple needs to get on the ball and release a new maps application. Google Maps has been super stale. Either in house or in partnership with google, but new maps application needs to happen.
--SHEFFmachine out
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--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

PS Speaking of maps, apple needs to get on the ball and release a new maps application. Google Maps has been super stale. Either in house or in partnership with google, but new maps application needs to happen.

One has to wonder what became of the mapping technology from the companies that Apple acquired.
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullhead View Post

You do realize by choosing Windows Phone 7 they have little to distinguish themselves from the competition? They are just a clone maker now who has to pay the Microsoft tax like the other cloners.

What competition? With Android, they would have to compete with dozens of low-cost Chinese Android models, as well as higher-end models from Motorola and HTC and the Koreans brands. With Windows Phone 7, they can offer models in all market segments and have a chance to establish themselves as the defacto Windows Phone 7 phone.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by columbus View Post

If NOKIA adopted Android Microsoft would be speaking with them as well. Don't forget every HTC pays Microsoft money for every Android phone they ship.

No they don't. No one knows what the agreement was. It could just be that HTC agreed to make some WP7 phones while MS tried to scare the competition into shelling out money by spreading FUD. So far that's worked out just as well as SCO attempts to hoodwink Linux vendors.
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by xsu View Post

Because choosing android would be like the finnish boy who pissed in his pants for warmth.

Seriously, choosing Android OS make you a commodity hardware vendor with little to distinguish yourself from the competition. And as just one of the many vendors, you wouldn't get any attention from Google regarding your own concerns.

Careful with the Finnish joke. You may get hit with crap from jfanning and whats it's name.
I had a nerve to mock them, and got lots of vile from them.
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by White Rabbit View Post

Careful with the Finnish joke. You may get hit with crap from jfanning and whats it's name.
I had a nerve to mock them, and got lots of vile from them.

Excuse me? What is your problem. You are the one that has an issue with factual history, not me.

Don't worry, I'm sure the moderators will ignore your bullshit post like usual.
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by White Rabbit View Post

Careful with the Finnish joke. You may get hit with crap from jfanning and whats it's name.
I had a nerve to mock them, and got lots of vile from them.

As a finn, I'd say xsu's pun was spot on.

Regs, Jarkko
post #30 of 31
There's some real leaps of logic here. I highly doubt Apple and Nokia will make peace over a mutual dislike of Android. Only fanboys think that way. Business operators do not.

That's a lot like morons who think that Oracle is out to kill Android. They are not. They just want a piece of the pie.

And there's zero proof that Nokia picked WP7 because of Android's patent problems. Several Nokia execs have specifically said, that it was the lack of opportunity to differentiate their brand that compelled them to go with Windows Phone 7 (though for the life of me, I can't figure out how an OS with even more rigid rules will let you differentiate yourself better...but whatever). I have not seen a single statement from a Nokia employee that they went with Windows Phone 7 because of Android's patent troubles. If somebody's got links, I'd like to see them....otherwise, this seems like FUD to me.

Personally, I think Nokia could have created a terrific Android platform. They could have been the OEM that actually does updates on time. And the transition would have been easier since Android operates a lot like Symbian. More so than WP7. And they could have worked in their ecosystem much better. Nokia phones could have come pre-installed with Ovi Maps, Ovi Store, etc. That would have been the differentiator....keeping their Nokia brand inside the Android ecosystem. Instead, they're now trying to merge their ecosystem with Microsoft's...all this and they didn't even get exclusivity from Microsoft. That's some huge risks they are taking. Good luck to them.

And then there's the inconsistency between saying WP7 is not a threat to Apple because it was DOA, yet it could prove to be a major competitor to Android. That does not make sense. These are all smartphone platforms. And they all compete with each other. Every Android sale is one that didn't go to RIM, Nokia, Apple, HP or Microsoft. Likewise, every iPhone sale, is a loss of opportunity for the others. And while iOS users are loyal, Android users are not too far behind in that department. This means the battle is on for new users. So how then can it be said, that somebody who takes up WP7 is a threat to Android but not a threat to iOS? Some real fanboy logic at work here....
post #31 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by eswinson View Post


Android will not weather the storm. I know everyone thinks I'm crazy but it has no roots or reason to stick around.

And here's why you're wrong:

Quote:
Originally Posted by eswinson View Post

The thing that keeps me tied to my iPhone and pretty much insures my next phone will be an iPhone too is that I can keep using my apps. A few hundred dollars in apps is a huge investment to have to throw away just to gain a few new features in a new platform.

What's good for the goose is good for the gander. You think people who are now using Android and have bought and paid for apps (and despite all the talk about Android users being slow to take up paid apps....the vast majority do actually buy apps on occassion), will want to switch away from Android?

Quote:
Originally Posted by eswinson View Post

It's not just the apps, its the content and settings and just comfort feeling I get using them.

And that's often been my argument. Generally speaking, I really don't find too much difference between iOS and Android or even Symbian for that matter. The similarities are far greater than the differences (most touchscreen OS' have similar UI principles). However, if you are used to using a certain platform, it will be hard to switch. Personally, as much as I like the the stability and smoothness of iOS, I can't see myself switching from Android because of the features that I like and use everyday: widgets, notification blind, the browser...all better than iOS. But that's what I am used to. Conversely, I am sure iOS users have reasons why they stick with iOS.

Aside from that, if you use Google's services like GMail, Google Talk or Google Maps, why would you even bother with anything other than Android? Compare Maps on iOS (developed by Apple) with Google Maps on Android (developed by Google). On the other hand, Apple's ecosystem for entertainment products is top-notch, whereas Google is non-existent on that front (no music/movie store). So if you are a huge music lover, perhaps iTunes might hold more importance to you than GMail.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eswinson View Post

Eventually MS/Nokia will be able to do what google can't - control their ecosystem.

Google has issue with OS updates. But they control the ecosystem quite well. The best and most used Android apps come from Google. And despite the push by various parties to have their own app stores, the most popular app store by far, remains the Android Market.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eswinson View Post

By building an app store that they can control and providing stable long supported phones that can run those apps they can effectively create a virtual lock-in for their customers.

Comments like this belie your ignorance. They had an App store on Symbian. The Ovi Store.
It was absolutely horrendous because of fragmentation. People who talk about fragmentation on Android have no clue what real fragmentation looks like. Whereas the vast majority of apps in the Android market work on the vast, vast majority of Android phones. This was not the case with Symbian and Ovi. Some apps worked on touchscreen phones. Some on keyboard phones. Some on only certain specific models and in certain specific region. It was an absolutely irritating mess. Anybody who used a Nokia Symbian can tell you all about the problems with the store.

This time around, they aren't even building their own app store. They're basically adopting the Windows model.

What I find odd in their decision, is that it comes after their insistence that they needed to maintain their own OS to control their own destiny (the peeing in the pants comment). After all that they said, they went out and adopted a 3rd party OS....after insisting that moving away from the vertically integrated model would be a bad idea.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eswinson View Post

It won't happen today but in time MS will do what MS does well... and in its borg like style it will consume a huge chunk of the mobile market. Nokia is actually lucky enough to get to come along for the ride.

Or MS could be the millstone around Nokia's neck. A year and a half transition? Who the hell is going to buy a Nokia smartphone in the next year and a half if you know that the OS on the phone is not going to supported here on in? And given the fact that Symbian has a look and feel closer to Android and iOS than WP7's Metro UI, I am stunned that they think their massive user base is going to convert en masse to WP7 at a whim. I am predicting huge gains for iOS and Android out of this.

But for Microsoft....yeah...they're getting a lot more out of this deal. Far more than Nokia is.
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