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Apple's new MobileMe cloud will rely on self-storage for streaming - rumor

post #1 of 78
Thread Starter 
Rather than providing tens of gigabytes of cloud-based storage for hosting music and other files, Apple's new MobileMe service is likely to rely on the space available on individual users' machines, according to a new report.

The well-sourced Jim Dalrymple at The Loop reported Monday that he believes Apple's new MobileMe will allow cloud syncing and sharing of content, but the actual storage will be hosted on individual users' computers. That runs contrary to some reports which have speculated that Apple will host the files on its own servers -- an approach that he called "a bit much."

"Instead of trying to provide everyone with cloud storage, I believe Apple will use MobileMe as the brain of the cloud service," he said. "The actual storage will be on our individual machines. In effect, in the cloud."

He said the system would allow for every song in a user's library to be listed on an iPhone, though only some of them would be saved locally and others would be downloaded from a user's home PC or Mac via iTunes. A similar approach was detailed in a patent application uncovered last week by AppleInsider, which described seamlessly merging cloud content with locally stored files into one library.

"I also believe that MobileMe will be more than about media," he said. "You will also be able to share and sync files and documents in much the same way. If there is a document on your home system that you need, it will always be available to you. Tap on it, and it downloads to your iPhone or iPad."

He also suggested that the service would sync contacts, calendars and other data, and would be compatible with Macs, the iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Windows PCs.

Dalrymple's take is in response to a new report from The Wall Street Journal, which claimed that Apple is looking to revamp MobileMe and make the service serve as a "locker" for content such as music, photos and videos. That approach would "eliminate the need for devices to carry a lot of memory."

The Journal also suggested that MobileMe could become free, a scenario Dalrymple said he believes won't happen. "We may see parts of MobileMe be free," he said, "but there still could be a charge for the main parts of the service."
post #2 of 78
What a dumb idea. Where do these people dream up such foolish rumors?

If it's stored on my own computer, then there's no value. The whole point of MobileMe is that I want access to my data when my computer is turned off.

If it's stored on someone else's computer, there are massive privacy concerns.

Dumb idea - never going to happen.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #3 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

What a dumb idea. Where do these people dream up such foolish rumors? Dumb idea - never going to happen.

Agreed. It's a backwards model. Apple best stop messing around before Google eats their lunch. A free mobile me service with storage is the only way to sell millions of these things. Anyone who thinks this iPhone nano will be $200 is dreaming. I'd say it'll be free on a mobile hotspot-like contract or otherwise $300 as a simple top-up/pre-pay phone. I have a funny feeling this phone could be a mega-hit if Apple gets it right. It could be the phone of choice for teens, worldwide. A 3" screen sounds like the way to go. The iPhone would remain Apple's premium, business person, adult consumer, grown-up Smartphone.

As for an App Store and on-board Flash storage - iPhone nano will get both.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #4 of 78
I just want iDisk to actually work... I watch it spin it's little wheel of death when I haven't changed anything all day... then go back to using my free DropBox account.... but, soon I will need to decide where to spend my $100 a year, and DropBox 'just works'.
post #5 of 78
This sounds awful coming from a rumors site, but when Steve introduces it and Apple sugar coats it everyone will love it. That's why Apple is always one step ahead of everyone. I can see then Google trying to copy this.
Apple had me at scrolling
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Apple had me at scrolling
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post #6 of 78
The well-sourced Jim Dalrymple at The Loop reported Monday that he believes Apple's new MobileMe will allow cloud syncing and sharing of content, but the actual storage will be hosted on individual users' computers. That runs contrary to some reports which have speculated that Apple will host the files on its own servers -- an approach that he called "a bit much."

Is this not exactly what apple is offering at the moment?

"Instead of trying to provide everyone with cloud storage, I believe Apple will use MobileMe as the brain of the cloud service," he said. "The actual storage will be on our individual machines. In effect, in the cloud."

What will be in the cloud when the machines are turned of that hold the actual data?

He said the system would allow for every song in a user's library to be listed on an iPhone, though only some of them would be saved locally and others would be downloaded from a user's home PC or Mac via iTunes. A similar approach was detailed in a patent application uncovered last week by AppleInsider, which described seamlessly merging cloud content with locally stored files into one library.

Who is going to setup the technical side of this in a secure way? Apple?

"I also believe that MobileMe will be more than about media," he said. "You will also be able to share and sync files and documents in much the same way. If there is a document on your home system that you need, it will always be available to you. Tap on it, and it downloads to your iPhone or iPad."

He also suggested that the service would sync contacts, calendars and other data, and would be compatible with Macs, the iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Windows PCs.

99% if not all is already existing...

Dalrymple's take is in response to a new report from The Wall Street Journal, which claimed that Apple is looking to revamp MobileMe and make the service serve as a "locker" for content such as music, photos and videos. That approach would "eliminate the need for devices to carry a lot of memory."

The Journal also suggested that MobileMe could become free, a scenario Dalrymple said he believes won't happen. "We may see parts of MobileMe be free," he said, "but there still could be a charge for the main parts of the service." [/QUOTE]
post #7 of 78
Makes sense. We already have our content stored on our machines at home. Why should apple duplicate it?

If apple makes streaming from one's PC simple with zero configuration, just leave on your PC when you leave home and have access to your whole library.
post #8 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post

Makes sense. We already have our content stored on our machines at home. Why should apple duplicate it?

If apple makes streaming from one's PC simple with zero configuration, just leave on your PC when you leave home and have access to your whole library.

If you've got an iphone (edit: or android), check out Audiogalaxy...it already does this for free, and quite well too. I use it all the time.
post #9 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post

Makes sense. We already have our content stored on our machines at home. Why should apple duplicate it?

Why? I can think of many reasons. You'd be surprised how many "regular people" actually turn off their computers. And this smaller iPhone will sell more so to younger people. Not copying your sync data is retarded, that's the whole idea of backing up, and it's the only way to cut that physical cable. Jim Dalrymple has missed the mark this time, me thinks.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #10 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Rather than providing tens of gigabytes of cloud-based storage for hosting music and other files, Apple's new MobileMe service is likely to rely on the space available on individual users' machines, according to a new report. ...

This is just dumbass speculation.

Personally, I think the flaw being made in these kinds of scenarios is in thinking that this cloud service will include your desktop computer. He says it's ridiculous and a "bit much" to expect that Apple will give us all enough space to do this kind of thing, but if you leave out the desktop computer it all becomes very reasonable.

The cloud as a storage area for Mobile devices means only giving folks the paltry amount of storage that's on your mobile device. If they then add in the idea that anything you *buy* in iTunes is also "in the cloud," it would be rare that anyone would need more than 20 Gigs or so. I think we'll see something like that for free for the iOS devices, and if you want similar for your desktop, you *pay*.
post #11 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

What a dumb idea. Where do these people dream up such foolish rumors?

If it's stored on my own computer, then there's no value. The whole point of MobileMe is that I want access to my data when my computer is turned off.

If it's stored on someone else's computer, there are massive privacy concerns.

Dumb idea - never going to happen.

I agree. I have a feeling that my computer's uptime and reliability are little bit inferior to that of a dedicated server farm with redundancy up the wazoo, and backups of backups of backups.

I also now have to keep my computer on 24/7? What if there's a power failure? What if my daughter pulls the plug, ala Johnny in "Airplane!"?
post #12 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post

Makes sense. We already have our content stored on our machines at home. Why should apple duplicate it?

If apple makes streaming from one's PC simple with zero configuration, just leave on your PC when you leave home and have access to your whole library.

Make no sense at all. When I think of a cloud service, I envision it to be something available everywhere at ANYTIME. If it depends on me leaving my computer on at all time, then it's just one long figurative wire back home.

If Apple wants to save on storage space, a smarter way would be to keep track of what content the user is putting into the cloud, if there's an equivalent file in AppStore already, then just save a link to that file. Then the millions of people who bought the same sound track from iTune can all have it in their cloud account, while Apple just need to store it once on their server.
post #13 of 78
So let me get this right: As per previous rumors, Apple is going to eliminate the DVD drive, change high-capacity mechanical drives to lower capacity and more expensive SSDs and according to this rumor, not provide a lot of storage space in the cloud and expect the user to use storage on the local device? Besides, as others have posted, the point of the cloud is to have content and files available to any device that you own.

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. Not happening.
post #14 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

What a dumb idea. Where do these people dream up such foolish rumors?

If it's stored on my own computer, then there's no value. The whole point of MobileMe is that I want access to my data when my computer is turned off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Agreed. It's a backwards model. Apple best stop messing around before Google eats their lunch. A free mobile me service with storage is the only way to sell millions of these things.

Like they said. - except there's no reason there can't be a free AND a paid version of MM.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

iPhone Nano - Like
Anyone who thinks this iPhone nano will be $200 is dreaming. I'd say it'll be free on a mobile hotspot-like contract or otherwise $300 as a simple top-up/pre-pay phone. I have a funny feeling this phone could be a mega-hit if Apple gets it right. It could be the phone of choice for teens, worldwide. A 3" screen sounds like the way to go. The iPhone would remain Apple's premium, business person, adult consumer, grown-up Smartphone.

As for an App Store and on-board Flash storage - iPhone nano will get both.

Yes - if this phone does materialize it could be huge. iPod, phone and texting - with dedicated apps. Sign me up for two.
post #15 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

This is just dumbass speculation.

Personally, I think the flaw being made in these kinds of scenarios is in thinking that this cloud service will include your desktop computer. He says it's ridiculous and a "bit much" to expect that Apple will give us all enough space to do this kind of thing, but if you leave out the desktop computer it all becomes very reasonable.

The cloud as a storage area for Mobile devices means only giving folks the paltry amount of storage that's on your mobile device. If they then add in the idea that anything you *buy* in iTunes is also "in the cloud," it would be rare that anyone would need more than 20 Gigs or so. I think we'll see something like that for free for the iOS devices, and if you want similar for your desktop, you *pay*.

There's no need to pay for the desktop if all your are backing up is what Mobile Me already does. The idea here is for the free Mobile Me - from Apple's POV - to be a selling point for Apple's devices. That's how they cover the costs of it, by selling billions of dollars of phones and only backing up specific data. As for iTunes music, they have no need to backup what they already have on their servers. And they won't give you access to your ripped songs. This is not brain surgery.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #16 of 78
One of the major changes in Apple TV was to vastly reduce on-device storage. Take it from me: BIG mistake! Download speeds were hit so bad that it was actually recommended that you download an Apple rental movie via iTunes to your computer and then stream it to your Apple TV. The previous generation Apple TV didn't have a problem. Unfortunately, this doesn't help with Netflix downloads. I don't even bother with Netflix HD, and its standard play can often leave me tearing out my hair.

So I can definitely see some advantage to this approach, considering the state of "cloud access" I've experienced. Of course, it may be that my experience is atypical.
post #17 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

What a dumb idea. Where do these people dream up such foolish rumors?

Clearly you never used Simplify Media (or as someone else here posted, Audiogalaxy - thanks for that, I've been hoping someone would replace Simplify's functionality after Google bought them up and shut down the service). I have a Mac Mini hosting hundreds of gigabytes of audio (and a lot more video) to my AppleTV. I don't care if Apple serves my content since I've already got a very capable server at home (and the Mini uses very little power).
post #18 of 78
simplify media already did something like this (and failed miserably, imho, but google still bought them.) and now there are the likes of zumocast, etc., trying to do it (and failing, again imho). i think it is the way to go, and i've been waiting for someone to do it right. apple just might do it.

i'm anti-cloud in that i will never trust my content to a third party, so for me this may turn out to be great news.
"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

appleinsider's mike campbell, august 15, 2013
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"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

appleinsider's mike campbell, august 15, 2013
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post #19 of 78
"No CLOUD for You!"

I really don't want my data in the cloud....where anyone with administrative access and proper security controls can view/copy it. Believe me....the people who administer these servers can view your data!
post #20 of 78
If it's streamed from one's home computer, I bet it has as much to do with licensing issues as it does with any technological issues. Haven't there been stories about Apple being ready to go with a cloud iTunes for a while, but that the labels have held it up over licensing issues? This could just be an end-run, lemonade out of lemons kind of thing.

So long as it's implemented well, this could be a good idea. The key, though, is to have very smart caching on the iDevice with advanced options for users who want to be in full control over what is with them and what remains on the computer at home. The last thing I want is to switch from paying for flash memory to paying huge data bills to AT&T. Flash is cheap compared to running through your monthly data limits...
post #21 of 78
Dumb rumor. The music streaming will be the same way LaLa was. One mass database, ya know the same one that powers the iTunes store, with tags in your account that you bought the song and thus can stream the full song.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #22 of 78
there are a couple of ways Apple's cloud iTunes service could work, but this article is way too simplistic.

the big problem now is, in order to stream music/media from your Mac:

- your computer must be turned on
- your must be logged in as user (not someone else)
- either a third party server app (for existing media streaming apps) or iTunes must be running

the simplest approach to avoid all that would be for Apple to store and sync your iTunes library file in the cloud (with your metadata, which your purchase history that Apple already has does not include), and based on that information stream to you from its own existing iTunes store servers any purchased content you already own, anytime and anywhere. iTunes song previews and movie rentals already work this way.

that way there is no license hassle with the media content owners, and no support of piracy. but your other media content would have to be streamed from your own computer, subject to the constraints above, because Apple has no way to verify if you stole it or not. i doubt that Apple can legally include unrestricted unverified streaming ability within iTunes, given its iTunes licensing agreements with all the content owners.

Apple could alternatively enable AppleTV to become a home media server with an iTunes app for it and external drives connected to its USB port (making it a NAS device). that would solve all the above constraints too. but again, the content you could stream would be limited to purchased content. (except for Home Sharing - so this would be a great option for Home Sharing, and i wish Apple would do it.)

this all begs the question of - if limitations to only purchased content can't be avoided - why not just offer a subscription iTunes music/movie/TV streaming service as many others have done? with your computer's iTunes library metadata also accessing/maintaining playlist, ranking, and other info you might add, for anything you have streamed (as long as your subscription continues!). it would be integrated seamlessly into iTunes, even with "add to library" for favorites or history tracking.

subscription services have not been very popular for others simply because iTunes still is so dominant overall. but it could become very popular as part of iTunes.

i think this is the most likely approach Apple will take. we'll see ...
post #23 of 78
So. Under this new scheme, if I use MobileMe to back up data from my home computer, then I am backing up my hard drive to... my hard drive? I think someone misunderstood something somewhere.

Do what you will, but harm none.

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Do what you will, but harm none.

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post #24 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by noexpectations View Post

"No CLOUD for You!"

I really don't want my data in the cloud....where anyone with administrative access and proper security controls can view/copy it. Believe me....the people who administer these servers can view your data!

Yes and the receptionist at my doctors office can read my chart... And the CSR at my credit card company can see where I bought that special gift for my g/f... And on and on....

Frankly I trust the security surrounding cloud services much more than that surrounding physical records. For an interesting read up on how Evernote secures data in transit and when stored... Same for DropBox.

As for the actually article. Seems far more likely it'll be a sync service like dropbox then remote access direct to one's home network, but it's comfortable to be an extension of time capsules/air disks. Just because your computer is turned off doesnt mean you can't have NAS live on your network.
post #25 of 78
Won't work in Canada... BBU will make this too expensive
post #26 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

the simplest approach to avoid all that would be for Apple to store and sync your iTunes library file in the cloud (with your metadata, which your purchase history that Apple already has does not include), and based on that information stream to you from its own existing iTunes store servers any purchased content you already own, anytime and anywhere. iTunes song previews and movie rentals already work this way.

that way there is no license hassle with the media content owners, and no support of piracy. but your other media content would have to be streamed from your own computer, subject to the constraints above, because Apple has no way to verify if you stole it or not. i doubt that Apple can legally include unrestricted unverified streaming ability within iTunes, given its iTunes licensing agreements with all the content owners.

I think this is right. I would just add that the second paragraph is very important -- Apple needs to still provide some way for users to stream their own, unpurchased content. Not only is that something that users need, but it's also a way for Apple to keep the content owners in check. You see, the reason that Sony will never withhold content from iTunes is that they know the alternative isn't people switching to Amazon -- it's people switching to piracy. The threat of rampant piracy is the biggest bargaining chip Apple has when dealing with the content owners. So, to the greatest extent possible, Apple always needs to keep piracy as a real alternative for people using Macs and iDevices.
post #27 of 78
If Apple were to offer a cloud service, I don't think there would be a need for a user to upload gigabytes worth of files to their mobile me account. What I think it will be is a digital locker akin to how Apple already does with rentals, but extended towards purchased items from iTunes: When we rent a movie or TV show, it references a master file. Since Apple already has a record of all our purchases, it should be relatively easy for them to implement this change for purchases. This will make purchasing through Apple TV extremely more convenient.

Of course, the question is how will bandwidth will be paid since it's not free for Apple. Or that if streaming through 3G will be limited to only music and photos while movies and shows limited to WiFi. We'll see...
post #28 of 78
Ok apple just spent billions for us to use our own computers for their new service? WILL NEVER HAPPEN, upstream speeds, router issues, security risks, nat upnp problems, network waking issues. this rumor is insane.

Storage for you and I is now less than $.04 a gig for hard disk space, for apple to give us 100gb would mean a one time cost of about $12 (retail) with triple redundancy and not all would fill that much space with music, plus bandwidth costs. Storage is so cheap no reason to do this rumor.

This is why they bought lala, hopefully they are as kind as lala was, it blew itunes out of the water as far as music listening and music discovery and prices.

Who believes this crap, who thinks this is a good idea?

Making it free would be a believable rumor as cheap as storage is now, if they want to compete with google and kill dropbox, and win over another couple millions users.

The future is a tablet world for 90% of consumers, they don't need computer problems and file managment issues. terras of storage online, time machine online for portables and any content you have or want to buy will be stored in the cloud not on your computer, you wont need a computer. right now you have to have a computer if you have a portable, soon that will change and a lot of people will not own "computers" they will have phones and tablets.

The data center is for "externals for your portables" not your computer - computers (and the issues they come with) will stick around only for those (me) who have to have them "professionals" everyone else will be able to get rid of them, and live off of there tablets, tablets will get plenty of storage soon but will always need more and we hate cords, enter cloud/highspeed connectivity.

That is the future, Apple see a world free of computer problems for consumers, that is why they are making the tablet, our kids will learn on tablets and so will our grandparents, and we will all forget the term file management, it will be a normal function of what the computer will do automatically.

Tablets will far outpace smartphones and they will start doing more but our interaction with them will stay very simple.
post #29 of 78
I have a hard time believing this story as presented.

Apple didn't build a huge data center in North Carolina so that data could be kept on our own machines.

The only thing that does make sense is that Apple retains records of what you have purchased and then references that from their digital archive when you need to re-download a song or software title.
post #30 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

This is just dumbass speculation.

Personally, I think the flaw being made in these kinds of scenarios is in thinking that this cloud service will include your desktop computer. He says it's ridiculous and a "bit much" to expect that Apple will give us all enough space to do this kind of thing, but if you leave out the desktop computer it all becomes very reasonable.

The cloud as a storage area for Mobile devices means only giving folks the paltry amount of storage that's on your mobile device. If they then add in the idea that anything you *buy* in iTunes is also "in the cloud," it would be rare that anyone would need more than 20 Gigs or so. I think we'll see something like that for free for the iOS devices, and if you want similar for your desktop, you *pay*.

Yes.

There may be another missing piece to the puzzle -- a home server.

The fanout would be something like this:


1) Apple Store (iTunes Store, App Store, Mac App Store)
a) repository of all A/V and app content

2) Mobile Me (Only New Features Shown)
a) central index of all user content
b) Free storage of tokens (pointers) to all purchased Apple Store content
c) Authorized devices deviceIDs
d) Free or Pay storage for Contacts, Calendars, etc.
e) Pay storage for files, Non-Apple Store purchased media (movies, photos, music, ripped DVDs)
f) Pay storage for TimeMachine Backups

3) Home Server (Like an AppleTV with storage) *
a) central index of all user content
b) local storage for recent purchases, or recently used content FIFO
c) central sync for Contacts, Calendars, etc.
d) central local TimeMachine Backups
e) central local iDevice backups

* The Home Server function can be provided by an app running on a dedicated Mac or a designated client Mac or PC within the home running iTunes.

4) AppleTV
a) transient storage for central content index
b) transient storage for AppleTV Media or Game being played
c) cross-loaded or downloaded from fastest available source

5) Client Mac or PC
a) iTunes as today (shared across several computers if desired)
b) sync for Contacts, Calendars, etc.
c) TimeMachine Backup Source

6) Client iDevices
a) local Apple-supplied content (apps, games, media)
b) local Personal data


Anyway, the concept is that your content may exist at several levels:
-- on an iDevice
-- on a local computer or home server
-- on Mobile me

Everything purchased from Apple, by definition, will be available from the cloud through MobileMe

Everything created locally can be stored and/or backed up to:
-- local computer
-- home server, if available
-- MobileMe (optional, fee)

Any content, anywhere in the system can be (securely) accessed from anywhere else in the system

Content will tend to migrate to local devices based on usage:

MobileMe--->Home Server-->Client Mac/PC-->iDevice

So, if it's near the Christmas Holiday, themed A/V files will tend to be located on local servers and iDevices

Recently played games, photo albums, home movies, etc. will be stored locally.


For someone starting today, with no content
-- everything purchased from Apple will be backed up/accessible (free)
-- whatever content created locally can be backed up/accessible (fee)

Users with existing content could choose to migrate some/all to MobileME for a fee

.
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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post #31 of 78
My computer is on 24/7 anyway and irrationally perhaps, I prefer my data to be stored on my machines. So cloud service without cloud storage works for me. Now, Apple will probably make the service free and if on top of that you want your stuff on their servers then I bet they'll gladly lease you some storage space just like most everyone else does.
post #32 of 78
If so-called library streaming requires one's PC to be on, I guess a few people here won't be using it.
post #33 of 78
Quote:

1) Apple Store (iTunes Store, App Store, Mac App Store)
a) repository of all A/V and app content

2) Mobile Me (Only New Features Shown)
a) central index of all user content
b) Free storage of tokens (pointers) to all purchased Apple Store content
c) Authorized devices deviceIDs
d) Free or Pay storage for Contacts, Calendars, etc.
e) Pay storage for files, Non-Apple Store purchased media (movies, photos, music, ripped DVDs)
f) Pay storage for TimeMachine Backups

3) Home Server (Like an AppleTV with storage) *
a) central index of all user content
b) local storage for recent purchases, or recently used content FIFO
c) central sync for Contacts, Calendars, etc.
d) central local TimeMachine Backups
e) central local iDevice backups

* The Home Server function can be provided by an app running on a dedicated Mac or a designated client Mac or PC within the home running iTunes.

4) AppleTV
a) transient storage for central content index
b) transient storage for AppleTV Media or Game being played
c) cross-loaded or downloaded from fastest available source

5) Client Mac or PC
a) iTunes as today (shared across several computers if desired)
b) sync for Contacts, Calendars, etc.
c) TimeMachine Backup Source

6) Client iDevices
a) local Apple-supplied content (apps, games, media)
b) local Personal data


Anyway, the concept is that your content may exist at several levels:
-- on an iDevice
-- on a local computer or home server
-- on Mobile me

Everything purchased from Apple, by definition, will be available from the cloud through MobileMe

Everything created locally can be stored and/or backed up to:
-- local computer
-- home server, if available
-- MobileMe (optional, fee)

Any content, anywhere in the system can be (securely) accessed from anywhere else in the system

Content will tend to migrate to local devices based on usage:

MobileMe--->Home Server-->Client Mac/PC-->iDevice

So, if it's near the Christmas Holiday, themed A/V files will tend to be located on local servers and iDevices

Recently played games, photo albums, home movies, etc. will be stored locally.


For someone starting today, with no content
-- everything purchased from Apple will be backed up/accessible (free)
-- whatever content created locally can be backed up/accessible (fee)

Users with existing content could choose to migrate some/all to MobileME for a fee

apples view of the world is so much simpler than this -- they are not making devices for this kind of person, they want 3 years olds and 90 year olds to be able to run there devices, not 8 layers of devices and storage solutions.

They will make it so that it works for everyone, if you are a techy you, and third party friends will find the way you like it best -- this is not apples goal though, they want an echosystem that just works, and simplicity rules at the end of the day.
post #34 of 78
For those of you thinking this all idea is stupid since you wouldn't want to leave on your home computer, well... You wouldn't have to:

There is already a way to actually power on your home computer remotely. Check it here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wake-on-LAN.

So Apple could make it easy for you to do it from an iPhone or an iPad and manage remotely your home files.

No need to duplicate your files. No need to leave your home machine always on. No need to give up your privacy. But have access to your data from anywhere. How does it sound?
post #35 of 78
Look at it this way, if you only owned a iPad or iPhone, what kind of services would you need to survive? Cloud services, storage, backup, and wireless communication for printing and scanning. You dont need a bunch of data local and cloud, soon we will all trust the cloud and stop buying externals. Maybe not now but soon.

Apple dosn't expect all of their customers to own 1 of everything, and for those things to all overlap, they are trying to simplify the world, if they are trying to do that, there end goal is not for you to have 10 devices.
post #36 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post


this all begs the question of - if limitations to only purchased content can't be avoided - why not just offer a subscription iTunes music/movie/TV streaming service as many others have done? with your computer's iTunes library metadata also accessing/maintaining playlist, ranking, and other info you might add, for anything you have streamed (as long as your subscription continues!). it would be integrated seamlessly into iTunes, even with "add to library" for favorites or history tracking.

subscription services have not been very popular for others simply because iTunes still is so dominant overall. but it could become very popular as part of iTunes.

i think this is the most likely approach Apple will take. we'll see ...


Now, there's the idea... we have a winner!


I have a dedicated Mini with 2 2TB external drives (1 backup)as a media server 10,000 songs, 800 movies plus home movies, photos, podcasts TV shows, etc.

Most of the content is Ripped DVDs and CDs, with about 5-10% purchased from iTunes.

If there were a way I could replace this with a subscription service, at say, $10-$20 month, I'd be all over it.

But I hope it would include capability for home movies, photos and other locally-generated content.
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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post #37 of 78
Quote:
For those of you thinking this all idea is stupid since you wouldn't want to leave on your home computer, well... You wouldn't have to:

There is already a way to actually power on your home computer remotely. Check it here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wake-on-LAN.

So Apple could make it easy for you to do it from an iPhone or an iPad and manage remotely your home files.

No need to duplicate your files. No need to leave your home machine always on. No need to give up your privacy. But have access to your data from anywhere. How does it sound?

Logging into you home computer via the net is a bigger security risk than the cloud I believe, the cloud will have the ability to encrypt private data, how many people have encrypted personal data, encrypted communication on their home computers or top notch security on their home computers. Not saying either is perfect, but dont know anyone who really knows whats going on in there router, were prefer to have professionals monitoring it as well.
post #38 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post

Makes sense. We already have our content stored on our machines at home. Why should apple duplicate it?

If apple makes streaming from one's PC simple with zero configuration, just leave on your PC when you leave home and have access to your whole library.

It's a bad idea for many reasons, some of which have already been listed:

1. My computer is turned off.
2. My computer is a laptop, I have my laptop on a plane, but my spouse wants to access my shared data.
3. My computer is processing a very intensive database or compressing video, etc, and is slow to respond to file requests.
4. My computer breaks down (one of the advantage of the cloud is my data is safely in the cloud if my computer breaks, fires, theft, etc).
5. Most people's ISP upload speeds are pretty slow.
6. Can't easily access your computer remotely through your ISPs router. Back to My Mac works great if you have all Apple network equipment, it's a bit dicey if you use another vendor's.
7. Most people would then be in violation of their ISPs service agreements which forbid operating a server on a personal account. (I know, it's not really enforced now.)
post #39 of 78
Personal servers are the way of the future. Why pay somebody else to host your content when you can do it yourself cheaply? There's no syncing, no limits, no background tasks, and no monthly dues. It's your stuff anywhere you want it. I've been doing it since 1996.

Many consumer network storage devices can run custom Linux software. The Apple TV just needs a disk port. The Mac Mini Server was already built for this. All of these are small, quiet, and consume very little power even if they're loaded up with several TB of disk space.

The only problem is that US ISPs have so little market competition that they often don't offer full Internet services. A personal server could be blocked, jammed, throttled, inaccessible, or cause for termination. Jamming is the worst because it would look like Apple's fault.
post #40 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by joshreeder View Post

Logging into you home computer via the net is a bigger security risk than the cloud I believe, the cloud will have the ability to encrypt private data, how many people have encrypted personal data, encrypted communication on their home computers or top notch security on their home computers. Not saying either is perfect, but dont know anyone who really knows whats going on in there router, were prefer to have professionals monitoring it as well.

What if the only gateway to log to your home computer is through Apple Cloud that will provide all the security you mentionned? Also, Apple could make it happen in a way we wouldn't know what's going on in our router. Apple Cloud Gateway (for instance) installed on all your devices would take care of everything.
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