or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › Apple's new MobileMe cloud will rely on self-storage for streaming - rumor
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple's new MobileMe cloud will rely on self-storage for streaming - rumor - Page 2

post #41 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by joshreeder View Post

Ok apple just spent billions for us to use our own computers for their new service? WILL NEVER HAPPEN, upstream speeds, router issues, security risks, nat upnp problems, network waking issues. this rumor is insane.

Storage for you and I is now less than $.04 a gig for hard disk space, for apple to give us 100gb would mean a one time cost of about $12 (retail) with triple redundancy and not all would fill that much space with music, plus bandwidth costs. Storage is so cheap no reason to do this rumor.

This is why they bought lala, hopefully they are as kind as lala was, it blew itunes out of the water as far as music listening and music discovery and prices.

Who believes this crap, who thinks this is a good idea?

Making it free would be a believable rumor as cheap as storage is now, if they want to compete with google and kill dropbox, and win over another couple millions users.

The future is a tablet world for 90% of consumers, they don't need computer problems and file managment issues. terras of storage online, time machine online for portables and any content you have or want to buy will be stored in the cloud not on your computer, you wont need a computer. right now you have to have a computer if you have a portable, soon that will change and a lot of people will not own "computers" they will have phones and tablets.

The data center is for "externals for your portables" not your computer - computers (and the issues they come with) will stick around only for those (me) who have to have them "professionals" everyone else will be able to get rid of them, and live off of there tablets, tablets will get plenty of storage soon but will always need more and we hate cords, enter cloud/highspeed connectivity.

That is the future, Apple see a world free of computer problems for consumers, that is why they are making the tablet, our kids will learn on tablets and so will our grandparents, and we will all forget the term file management, it will be a normal function of what the computer will do automatically.

Tablets will far outpace smartphones and they will start doing more but our interaction with them will stay very simple.

Quote:
Originally Posted by joshreeder View Post

apples view of the world is so much simpler than this -- they are not making devices for this kind of person, they want 3 years olds and 90 year olds to be able to run there devices, not 8 layers of devices and storage solutions.

They will make it so that it works for everyone, if you are a techy you, and third party friends will find the way you like it best -- this is not apples goal though, they want an echosystem that just works, and simplicity rules at the end of the day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by joshreeder View Post

Look at it this way, if you only owned a iPad or iPhone, what kind of services would you need to survive? Cloud services, storage, backup, and wireless communication for printing and scanning. You dont need a bunch of data local and cloud, soon we will all trust the cloud and stop buying externals. Maybe not now but soon.

Apple dosn't expect all of their customers to own 1 of everything, and for those things to all overlap, they are trying to simplify the world, if they are trying to do that, there end goal is not for you to have 10 devices.


I quoted all your posts, because I think you are spot on!

I was making the solution too complex!


This feature is mainly targeted to the future -- a future where most homes and users will have iDevices only -- no traditional computers as we know/use them today.

Most content will be purchased/rented/subscribed from the cloud.

Some content will be created on the iDevices (photos, movies, documents, drawings, presos, etc.)

All of this will be backed up/stored on the cloud.


There may be an AppleTV/AirportExtreme box that simplifies and aggregates the cloud connection in homes with multiple iDevices.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #42 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by A_K View Post

For those of you thinking this all idea is stupid since you wouldn't want to leave on your home computer, well... You wouldn't have to:

There is already a way to actually power on your home computer remotely. Check it here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wake-on-LAN.

So Apple could make it easy for you to do it from an iPhone or an iPad and manage remotely your home files.

No need to duplicate your files. No need to leave your home machine always on. No need to give up your privacy. But have access to your data from anywhere. How does it sound?

this would be ok for waking from sleep (which AppleTV does automatically, btw). but who wants to wait for a full boot and log on to play a song? and what if different user is already using that computer?
post #43 of 78
This is probably right. It's likely the syncing will work like Dropbox. The reason being is that the Maiden, NC data center is positioned for low cost not high performance streaming.

Generally the approach used for streaming content is to place data centers close to the users and close to dense hubs or PoPs. In such a case one would be putting their data centers logically in major cities, where they are both close to the end user and close to the most dense and diverse set of network interconnects.

Akamai and Limelight that focus on content delivery CDNs follow this method, but also try to distribute their servers and have mirrors as close to if not directly tied to each of the major end client providers (often the cable companies and consumer telcos). This is the edge network approach.

Again Apple's Maiden, NC data center is located for cheap storage space, it is not positioned to steam high volumes of content in real time.
post #44 of 78
Using your own hardware could be the free services, but imo there will a $$ service with online storage too.
post #45 of 78
What about if they offer a combination of storage options
Local to the iDevice - at users discresion
Hosted in the cloud - maybe free for iTunes purchased content and paid by space for other content including all file based content on your home pc ( like DropBox with maybe a free amount)
Local/Home - As suggested in the article where your PC is left on and you can stream other content ( not purchased from iTunes - ripped from CDs etc) Free or with MobileMe subscription )

So there is plenty of different options to innovate, add more value to the ecosystem and for Apple to make money.
post #46 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

this would be ok for waking from sleep (which AppleTV does automatically, btw). but who wants to wait for a full boot and log on to play a song? and what if different user is already using that computer?

Computers are booting faster and faster. Start the new Macbook Air and you get a good idea of where computing in general is moving towards.

Now, if another person's using it than no need to boot. The cloud system would notice that the computer is already on and give you directly access to your files.

The cloud system would also provide all kinds of security, firewall, etc. Apple could make all that working easily. No need for people to know anything about routers, etc.

I don't know if it will happen but I don't think it stupid either. It at least addresses the issue of leaving your computer on.
post #47 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post

Makes sense. We already have our content stored on our machines at home. Why should apple duplicate it?

If apple makes streaming from one's PC simple with zero configuration, just leave on your PC when you leave home and have access to your whole library.

I think is a neat way to get around licensing issues, its your stuff on your storage and iTunes is just the go between, we don't have to repurchase license or contest the agreement with the original purchase or ownership apple doesn't own it we do

ya and if my laptop is off what then?

and if that's the case why huge server farm?
I APPLE THEREFORE I AM
Reply
I APPLE THEREFORE I AM
Reply
post #48 of 78
This may have been mentioned already...but Apple should buy DropBox. Unless they are planning to offer something way better than DropBox!

Best
post #49 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by A_K View Post

Computers are booting faster and faster. Start the new Macbook Air and you get a good idea of where computing in general is moving towards.

Now, if another person's using it than no need to boot. The cloud system would notice that the computer is already on and give you directly access to your files.

The cloud system would also provide all kinds of security, firewall, etc. Apple could make all that working easily. No need for people to know anything about routers, etc.

I don't know if it will happen but I don't think it stupid either. It at least addresses the issue of leaving your computer on.

Great points AK. I'm inclined to believe Jobs on this, too. I'm looking at the MBA with just 64Gig of memory...because of Dropbox and the cloud.

I may just go with the new iPad (save $500) and make all my reports, charts, etc., useable on the iPad. Simple charts once setup are easier to update and modify.

Who wants to be working on desktop all day? Ugh!

Best
post #50 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by A_K View Post

Computers are booting faster and faster. Start the new Macbook Air and you get a good idea of where computing in general is moving towards.

True, eventually. but only a fraction of today's Macs in use have SSD's. will take some years before a majority do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by A_K View Post

Now, if another person's using it than no need to boot. The cloud system would notice that the computer is already on and give you directly access to your files.

no, can only access one user's files at a time right now. maybe with OS X Lion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by A_K View Post

The cloud system would also provide all kinds of security, firewall, etc. Apple could make all that working easily. No need for people to know anything about routers, etc.

yes could be done, but would need some OS level changes. Mayve with OS X Lion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by A_K View Post

I don't know if it will happen but I don't think it stupid either. It at least addresses the issue of leaving your computer on.

yeah. but Apple could enable AppleTV to be your NAS media hub very easily today and avoid all these practical issues.
post #51 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

Great points AK. I'm inclined to believe Jobs on this, too. I'm looking at the MBA with just 64Gig of memory...because of Dropbox and the cloud.

I may just go with the new iPad (save $500) and make all my reports, charts, etc., useable on the iPad. Simple charts once setup are easier to update and modify.

Who wants to be working on desktop all day? Ugh!

Best

Yep you got it, who does? Plus, who wants to leave it on all day? And who wants to leave all their data in the cloud? Apple solution's will be addressing all these points my friend.
post #52 of 78
No more MobileMe for me. The only thing I use is the syncing and i'm not going to pay Apple one more cent for this. I love Apple but paying for just syncing is so stupid, I have been doing that for to many years! Yes Apple smart, me stupid
post #53 of 78
The pieces of the puzzle are falling into place.. there are already many "thin clients" in place (iPhone, iPod, ipad, apple tv) and several rumored (iPhone mini, small touch iMac), and soon Mac OS will be able to run on ARM architecture which will make a great low powered home server computer. People are not going to want to trust cloud servers, particularly with the creepy specter of google in the air (albeit much less creepy with the de-throning of Eric "the mole" Schmitt). So apple will provide the ability to combine privacy and cloud services with a home server. Apple's expertise in software will make it easy to administer secure content from home. It seems like it's going to be a great idea, and another way apple will change the consumer electronic landscape.

As for the iPhone mini, the rumors make me optimistic that apple will have a significant push for iwallet and social media this summer, facilitated by NFC, which will benefit greatly from increased marketshare. Apple can worry about higher margin pro devices after this base is established. I just wish I had more money to put into AAPL!

I love being an apple fan
post #54 of 78
So they're assuming that people WANT a "home computer", and that it's always turned on as a server at home? And people with MacBooks carry their data around anyways?
And if they don't have a home computer, just buy a mac mini?

I don't want yet another computer, and I don't want a server at home. Perhaps they're gonna introduce a new TimeCapsule hardware that has more storage and is doing all this cloud business for you with iTunes configuration?
post #55 of 78
Are people forgetting the patents apple took out outlining a feature of an ios device to allow one to sit down at any mac, and have access to all of their personal settings and info, affectively making it "there" mac?

http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...computing.html

It's all coming together baby, convergence is the goal we are looking at here
post #56 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by A_K View Post

What if the only gateway to log to your home computer is through Apple Cloud that will provide all the security you mentionned? Also, Apple could make it happen in a way we wouldn't know what's going on in our router. Apple Cloud Gateway (for instance) installed on all your devices would take care of everything.

We need to realize that as techies we are not the vast majority. Normal people will never have a "home server" Servers break they need redundancy, they need to be upgraded, they need to be restarted, they need a lot of things, and constant attention just like a computer does, the general public hates computer issues, maybe 5% of the public would invest in a personal server, but that's not the future and apple knows it, just like all the internet startups know it, apple has done things like this and they do work for the most part if you own an apple router and all your settings are right and then its works about 50% of the time.

Drop box is brilliant, and would be a good version of the future, it syncs everything, cloud to computer and access from any device, the service would be a failure if it relied on my computer to be up 99.99% of the time which is what we need to make this happen.

This makes as much sense as hosting your own website on your computer. The reliability and know how to do so makes no sense when you can have pro do it for 5 bucks a month and it actually works.
post #57 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post

My computer is on 24/7 anyway and irrationally perhaps, I prefer my data to be stored on my machines. So cloud service without cloud storage works for me. Now, Apple will probably make the service free and if on top of that you want your stuff on their servers then I bet they'll gladly lease you some storage space just like most everyone else does.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin McMurtrie View Post

Personal servers are the way of the future. Why pay somebody else to host your content when you can do it yourself cheaply? There's no syncing, no limits, no background tasks, and no monthly dues. It's your stuff anywhere you want it. I've been doing it since 1996.

Many consumer network storage devices can run custom Linux software. The Apple TV just needs a disk port. The Mac Mini Server was already built for this. All of these are small, quiet, and consume very little power even if they're loaded up with several TB of disk space.

The only problem is that US ISPs have so little market competition that they often don't offer full Internet services. A personal server could be blocked, jammed, throttled, inaccessible, or cause for termination. Jamming is the worst because it would look like Apple's fault.

There are several problems with this logic:

1. Many U.S. ISPs prohibit the use of a home server on the Internet.
2. It requires home computers to be left on all the time. Some of us prefer not to do that - for various reasons.
3. There are close to 400,000 home fires in the U.S. every year. I prefer to have my backup data stored off-site and managed remotely. Yes, that can be done with a home server, but it's a lot less convenient.
4. If you have a home server, why do you need MobileMe? it wouldn't add any value.
5. Many routers are difficult to set up for outbound service.
6. No backup in case your system is stolen.

Basically, the use of a home server negates the entire point of MobileMe. Now, they work well in combination - I have a home server with all my data. I backup my home server to a RAID 5 backup device. But I ALSO backup the critical data to MobileMe.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #58 of 78
Looking to the future I believe we know what the goal will be, computers as we know them will transition into a specialty product for us "techies" the rest of the world will be able to live on simpler devices that just work. For too long people have struggled with this device that only computer technicians really know how to operate.

There will be transitional ideas and techniques, iPad is a huge transitional product, its no where close to where it will be and will eventually level out as the new computer, right now its a little useless, but i think they intended to do it this way to see where it organically grows, what people want and need.

Home servers are transitional products they have been around forever and have never gone mainstream and never will. But in the meantime they may exist as a transitional product but its important to look at where things are headed and figure out how to get there quickly so we all dont waste time and money.

Remember when it came out and we were all scratching our heads,saying what are we gonna do with this thing? We already have iPhones, well if as it was announced I got a glimpse of the future, I saw that for now it was in fact a little useless, mainly because you can get rid of your computer, the services and technologies weren't there, and doubt they will get there before the year is out. but that is the ultimate goal.

The ability to hand your 75 year old grandmother an iPad and be able to communicate with her and push her photos from yours without her having to pick up an instructions manual, the same for children in school, my son might never know what a file extension is.

I do love the iPad (retina display please) but I will buy an iPad when it can survive without a "Mother" computer. Until then it will remain a transition product.

Requirements for the standalone iPad.
USB 2 or 3 - or way to read external media - although this may be done wirelessly through usb ports on the airport.
Online everything - backup, app store, personal storage, software updates, activation
post #59 of 78
The speculation doesn't make much sense to me. What makes more sense to me is Apple will negotiate streaming rights for music it already sells on the iTunes music store but instead of actually transferring your stored files to Apple's servers, it simply checks your iTunes account for your previously purchased music and makes those available for streaming. Meanwhile, the rest of your music NOT acquired through iTunes will probably run off something like a Time Capsule or Time Machine with attached USB storage, which always maintains a persistent Internet connection anyway. So Apple will probably release some firmware update or new device that will act as a constant, Internet-connected home service. This gets around the "leave my computer on" issue.
post #60 of 78
Deleted duplicate post
post #61 of 78
It does sound backwards, but it makes more sense. Apple is in it to make money, so they will probably allow you to pay the same fees to have them store your data, but enable more people to enjoy accessing their data remotely by requiring your own storage for free or maybe giving away a gigabyte or two. A few people might use it besides they can always try and fail.
post #62 of 78
Folks, this is likely Apple's answer to what Microsoft is doing.

Check out the new Vail Home Server OS pre-release and Live Mesh. One of my friends at work has been playing with the new Home Server OS to see what it offers versus what he has set up at home. Using Live Mesh, he's able to watch any movie, view any picture, and listen to any MP3 that's on his home server from his office at work, or anywhere he gets an Internet connection.
post #63 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

the simplest approach to avoid all that would be for Apple to store and sync your iTunes library file in the cloud (with your metadata, which your purchase history that Apple already has does not include), and based on that information stream to you from its own existing iTunes store servers any purchased content you already own, anytime and anywhere. iTunes song previews and movie rentals already work this way.

that way there is no license hassle with the media content owners, and no support of piracy. but your other media content would have to be streamed from your own computer, subject to the constraints above, because Apple has no way to verify if you stole it or not. i doubt that Apple can legally include unrestricted unverified streaming ability within iTunes, given its iTunes licensing agreements with all the content owners.

I believe that this approach is Apple's reluctant second choice. Based on rumors over the past few years, Apple has been unable to get content providers to buy into a either a digital locker or subscription service. As mentioned above and by others, this is Apple working around these issues.

Apple can already access music based on any purchased content from the iTunes Store under the current licensing arrangement. The problem is with streaming content you have ripped at home which will require that you host the content and make it available to your mobile devices - this will require that some type of "server" be left on. Apple could maintain a content list on Mobile Me pointing to iTunes content or to content on your server. If the content is on your server, Apple could use a basically dedicated version of "Back to My Mac" to access your local library. Apple could also build an iTunes server into Time Machine as an alternative.

I think this may be the wedge to get some movement on subscriptions. Apple is basically thumbing their nose at the content providers saying "See, we've made your content available to users already and it's not making you any extra money. Would you like to sit down and discuss a subscription service so we can send some money your way?"
post #64 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Now, there's the idea... we have a winner!


I have a dedicated Mini with 2 2TB external drives (1 backup)as a media server 10,000 songs, 800 movies plus home movies, photos, podcasts TV shows, etc.

Most of the content is Ripped DVDs and CDs, with about 5-10% purchased from iTunes.

If there were a way I could replace this with a subscription service, at say, $10-$20 month, I'd be all over it.

But I hope it would include capability for home movies, photos and other locally-generated content.

Based on rumors, Apple has been trying for several years to get a subscription service. The record companies, in all their wisdom, have allowed others to pursue subscription services but refuse to allow Apple for fear that they would have to much control (in other words, Apple would be too successful and the content companies would rather have control over money - all the while belly-aching that they don't make what they used to in the good ole days).
post #65 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

So they're assuming that people WANT a "home computer", and that it's always turned on as a server at home? And people with MacBooks carry their data around anyways?
And if they don't have a home computer, just buy a mac mini?

I don't want yet another computer, and I don't want a server at home. Perhaps they're gonna introduce a new TimeCapsule hardware that has more storage and is doing all this cloud business for you with iTunes configuration?

A TimeCapsule with a built-in iTunes server would be great.
post #66 of 78
The real problem is trying to actually upload a user's 30GB+ collection would take months to finish.\\ and would probably hit some caps. Just detecting what songs were on a computer based on MP3 tags would lead to rampant abuse (changed tags = new songs!). Only offering the service to songs purchased on iTunes means few people would ever use it (what about songs ripped from a CD?).
post #67 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by penchanted View Post

I believe that this approach is Apple's reluctant second choice. Based on rumors over the past few years, Apple has been unable to get content providers to buy into a either a digital locker or subscription service. As mentioned above and by others, this is Apple working around these issues.

Apple can already access music based on any purchased content from the iTunes Store under the current licensing arrangement. The problem is with streaming content you have ripped at home which will require that you host the content and make it available to your mobile devices - this will require that some type of "server" be left on. Apple could maintain a content list on Mobile Me pointing to iTunes content or to content on your server. If the content is on your server, Apple could use a basically dedicated version of "Back to My Mac" to access your local library. Apple could also build an iTunes server into Time Machine as an alternative.

I think this may be the wedge to get some movement on subscriptions. Apple is basically thumbing their nose at the content providers saying "See, we've made your content available to users already and it's not making you any extra money. Would you like to sit down and discuss a subscription service so we can send some money your way?"


Amnesty?


What if there were a way for the content providers and Apple to allow amnesty or legalization of existing collections of electronic media containing for-sale content.

Say something as simple as the Next iTunes version has an Amnesty menu item that works similar to Get Album Artwork.

Your content titles would be processed against the master iTunes index -- for any matches, a token would be created in your iTunes account indicating that you "own" a digital copy of that item.

Your MobileMe account would store these tokens and allow streaming to any of your registered computers/iDevices/AppleTVs.

The theory being: if you already "own" a for-sale digital title, you are not willing to buy it again.

However, you may be willing to pay a one-time "legalization" fee to gain the convenience of streaming anywhere, anytime from the cloud -- and elimination of local storage and backup.


As with any collection, there will be things that are not available in the master iTunes library and would need to be uploaded to MobileMe to gain the streaming advantage.

There are many ways Apple and the content-providers could assure that this amnesty/legalization is not exploited.


Going forward, any additional content purchased through the Apple Store would automatically be "legal"


Maybe, we can take the next step in "convenience" that makes it possible for us to buy, pay for, and enjoy content on all our devices while assuring that those who create and provide content are fairly paid for their efforts.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #68 of 78
The only way this could even remotely be sucessful is if time capsule becomes the cloud server with zero config. No one is gonna run their desktop 24/7, at least not the average folk. The hard drive is spinning it is eating up power and can't really be expect to work long if left unattended (not windows anyways).

Sure you can but a Mac mini server edition and osx is server class unix, but again not the average person. iPhone is an average person business with a broad market.

Free iDisk for 2 gigs plus iTunes cloud would be enough for most users.
--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
Reply
--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
Reply
post #69 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Amnesty?


What if there were a way for the content providers and Apple to allow amnesty or legalization of existing collections of electronic media containing for-sale content.

Say something as simple as the Next iTunes version has an Amnesty menu item that works similar to Get Album Artwork.

Your content titles would be processed against the master iTunes index -- for any matches, a token would be created in your iTunes account indicating that you "own" a digital copy of that item.

Your MobileMe account would store these tokens and allow streaming to any of your registered computers/iDevices/AppleTVs.

The theory being: if you already "own" a for-sale digital title, you are not willing to buy it again.

However, you may be willing to pay a one-time "legalization" fee to gain the convenience of streaming anywhere, anytime from the cloud -- and elimination of local storage and backup.


As with any collection, there will be things that are not available in the master iTunes library and would need to be uploaded to MobileMe to gain the streaming advantage.

There are many ways Apple and the content-providers could assure that this amnesty/legalization is not exploited.

I like the amnesty idea - except for the prospect of handing any more money to the labels to use content I have already paid for. However, if the charge was reasonable, I would probably go for it. However, the labels will want some silly amount because they truly believe that everyone is a thief and their product is so extraordinary.

Quote:
Going forward, any additional content purchased through the Apple Store would automatically be "legal"

What happens when I rip something new? I still buy a lot of vinyl and CDs.
post #70 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

The only way this could even remotely be sucessful is if time capsule becomes the cloud server with zero config. No one is gonna run their desktop 24/7, at least not the average folk. The hard drive is spinning it is eating up power and can't really be expect to work long if left unattended (not windows anyways).

There are NAS devices which include an iTunes server.Here's an example:
http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/pro...ge/blackarmor/

It should be simple enough for Apple to add this capability to Time Capsule.
post #71 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

This may have been mentioned already...but Apple should buy DropBox. Unless they are planning to offer something way better than DropBox!

Best

It has been mentioned loads of times. And that's because it's pennies to them and would be totally worth it. They only thing that's stopping that deal going through is Mr. ego.

iDisk is an abomination.

My wish would be for Apple to buy both Dropbox and Cloud App and use both technologies to make a super Folder Style iDisk 2.0 with an additional quick drop menubar. Heck they could simply buy Dropbox and use that to sync the whole Documents folder on your Mac, for free. Would be completely seamless, invisibly simple and very clever. It would make perfect sense. It should have happened 2 years ago.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #72 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by penchanted View Post

I like the amnesty idea - except for the prospect of handing any more money to the labels to use content I have already paid for. However, if the charge was reasonable, I would probably go for it. However, the labels will want some silly amount because they truly believe that everyone is a thief and their product is so extraordinary.


What happens when I rip something new? I still buy a lot of vinyl and CDs.


First, the Amnesty approach wouldn't work for everyone -- hopefully, though, for the majority.

Second, this could be handled the same way as content not available from Apple/iTunes -- rip and upload to mobile me -- you pay for the storage.

Third, a hard copy CD or DVD could contain a serial number (digital or stamped into the Label) that could be registered once to become an online token.

I also assume that you could sell or reassign your tokens to another user ID, invalidating the existing ones.

I think that there are ways to do this and satisfy most of the users and providers -- there is a lot to be gained to get around the current stalemate between Apple, providers, and users.

There is money to be made!

Other than that, a subscription service is a good second choice.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #73 of 78
obe...
.
Reply
.
Reply
post #74 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeyondYourFrontDoor View Post

I just want iDisk to actually work... I watch it spin it's little wheel of death when I haven't changed anything all day... then go back to using my free DropBox account.... but, soon I will need to decide where to spend my $100 a year, and DropBox 'just works'.

Agreed. Totally. iDisk is a laughably poor product.
post #75 of 78
Without Steve around 100% of the time, I'm afraid the Mac, MobileMe and iTunes divisions will be floundering for a while over the next few years. iOS would remain stellar for at least a while since it seems that's where Steve really put a lot of energy into it.
post #76 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Without Steve around 100% of the time, I'm afraid the Mac, MobileMe and iTunes divisions will be floundering for a while over the next few years. iOS would remain stellar for at least a while since it seems that's where Steve really put a lot of energy into it.

Why do you think that all of this emanates from Steve. Apple is loaded with talented engineers who have been working on all that you mentioned. In someways, I'd actually like to see Steve gone because it would become clear that he is the (most excellent) face for the company but that there are actually other people at Apple that make things happen.

At any rate, Steve specifically said that MobileMe would see big improvements which means those would already have his approval.
post #77 of 78
Daft idea - what's the point in Appled esigning their computers to reduce their energy demand with efficient components, sleep functions, spinning down the hard disk and reducing screen brightness only to trash the lot by requiring me to leave my Mac awake?

And of course when I go on holiday or away for the weekend and switch it off ...

Who suggests this crazy stuff? Do they ever think it through?
post #78 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by KiltedGreen View Post

Do they ever think it through?

No. That's why they are analysts, not engineers.
.
Reply
.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › Apple's new MobileMe cloud will rely on self-storage for streaming - rumor