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iOS jailbreakers thwarted by Apple's latest version of iBooks

post #1 of 164
Thread Starter 
Apple has taken a new approach in its battle with users who hack iOS-powered devices like the iPhone and iPad, blocking "jailbreakers" from accessing content in its iBooks e-reader application.

Using the hack dubbed "greenpois0n" to jailbreak Apple's iOS 4.2.1 triggers a "jailbreak check" built into the mobile operating system since version 4.0, according to Social Apples. That "check" reportedly prevents some users from opening content in the latest version iBooks.

"There is a problem with the configuration of your iPhone," the error message in iBooks 1.2.1 reads. "Please restore with iTunes and reinstall iBooks."

Hacker "Comex" of the iPhone Dev Team explained via Twitter how the new anti-jailbreak measure works: "It seems that before opening a DRMed book, iBooks drops an improperly signed binary, tries to execute it, and if it works concludes that the device is jailbroken and refuses to open the book."

In December it was claimed that a jailbreaking application programming interface found in iOS 4 was disabled with the release of iOS 4.2. But the newly discovered security measure apparently only applies to the iBooks software.



Because the change applies only to the iBooks application downloaded from the App Store and is not a system-wide issue, it's likely that Apple's interest is to curb potential piracy of e-books. Jailbreaking is a process that allows iOS device users to run unauthorized code, and can also be used to pirate software and content from the App Store and elsewhere.

But according to Social Apples, the security measure also prevents users from accessing legally purchased e-books through the iBooks application on a jailbroken device. Though it is a warranty voiding process, the practice of jailbreaking to run unauthorized code was deemed legal by the U.S. government last July.
post #2 of 164
What I hear apple saying here is they want me to buy kindle books from now on.
post #3 of 164
I mainly use iBooks on my iPad, can't load my books on my iPhone as the article says. Just means I'll get all books from Kindle store now. If it's between losing Mywi or iBooks it's no contest!
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post #4 of 164
I bought my iPhone from AT&T for $200
I pay my monthly AT&T bill of $113
I jailbreak my phone

Now, books I have purchased for ~$15 each are not viewable?

How is this not extortion? What I am doing (jailbreaking) is perfectly legal. What Apple has done, is denying me the ability to view a book I have legitimately paid for.

This is nothing short of extortion. Now, this will create a new effort by people to crack the DRM on iBooks; and when the DRM is broken on iBooks - this will create a new Book piracy industry that does not exist today.

As we used to say in grade school - "Nice move, Ex-lax"
post #5 of 164
Ridiculously simple workaround available on Cydia in 3...2...1...
post #6 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

I bought my iPhone from AT&T for $200
I pay my monthly AT&T bill of $113
I jailbreak my phone

Now, books I have purhcased for $15 are not viewable.

How is this not extortion? What I am doing (jailbreaking) is perfectly legal. What Apple has done, is denying me the ability to view a book I have legitimately paid for.

This is nothing short of extortion.

What does paying AT&T have to do with anything?

The rest of your argument is sound, but the beginning is meaningless.

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Originally Posted by Shunnabunich View Post

Ridiculously simple workaround available on Cydia in 3...2...1...

It's already out.

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post #7 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

I bought my iPhone from AT&T for $200
I pay my monthly AT&T bill of $113
I jailbreak my phone

Now, books I have purhcased for $15 are not viewable.

How is this not extortion? What I am doing (jailbreaking) is perfectly legal. What Apple has done, is denying me the ability to view a book I have legitimately paid for.

This is nothing short of extortion.

You should totally sue
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post #8 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

... "It seems that before opening a DRMed book, iBooks drops an improperly signed binary, tries to execute it, and if it works concludes that the device is jailbroken and refuses to open the book."
...

That's clever!
post #9 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetim View Post

What I hear apple saying here is they want me to buy kindle books from now on.

What you really hear is Apple saying is lets support developers. Jailbreaking is the way apps are pirated. Not all people with jailbroken iPhones (?) steal software but per news reports there are enough of them out there that at times it has been approx 90% stolen 10% purchased (for certain apps). Lets pay people for their hard work. Typically apps are in the $0.99 to $4.99 range with the lower side being more the norm. Is it too much to ask to pay people for their hard work.

I get it that to some folks they feel limited and they want to hack the iPhone. I also see what has happened with the android OS and am glad I am in this walled garden, no virus protection needed, not much in the app store as far as stolen content or apps, malware or the like. Thanks, but no thanks, I'll keep my iPhone.

BTW: I am also a developer.
post #10 of 164
not a big deal but a bad move i think. if i bought a book let me read it, crack down on illegal copies instead.

Jail breaking is not just about piracy. SMB settings, weather icon, five icon dock, and soon turn by turn voice navigation in google maps are all good examples of jailbreak apps. some are even paid apps that developers make money from.

In addition its a play ground to test airplay hacks that are not authorized by apple, but harm no one but the crashed user's device.

Besides if only 2% are jailbroken how big of a piracy threat is it?
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post #11 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

I bought my iPhone from AT&T for $200
I pay my monthly AT&T bill of $113
I jailbreak my phone

Now, books I have purchased for ~$15 each are not viewable?

How is this not extortion? What I am doing (jailbreaking) is perfectly legal. What Apple has done, is denying me the ability to view a book I have legitimately paid for.

This is nothing short of extortion. Now, this will create a new effort by people to crack the DRM on iBooks; and when the DRM is broken on iBooks - this will create a new Book piracy industry that does not exist today.

As we used to say in grade school - "Nice move, Ex-lax"

Stop crying like a baby and thank your lucky stars Apple allows you to use a jailbroken iPhone at all.
post #12 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post

I get it that to some folks they feel limited and they want to hack the iPhone. I also see what has happened with the android OS and am glad I am in this walled garden, no virus protection needed, not much in the app store as far as stolen content or apps, malware or the like. Thanks, but no thanks, I'll keep my iPhone.

BTW: I am also a developer.

You are one overly trusting fool. There are as many or more security issues with a non-jailbroken phone as one that has been jailbroken and had the standard passwords changed.
post #13 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

I bought my iPhone from AT&T for $200
I pay my monthly AT&T bill of $113
I jailbreak my phone

Now, books I have purchased for ~$15 each are not viewable?

How is this not extortion? What I am doing (jailbreaking) is perfectly legal. What Apple has done, is denying me the ability to view a book I have legitimately paid for.

This is nothing short of extortion. Now, this will create a new effort by people to crack the DRM on iBooks; and when the DRM is broken on iBooks - this will create a new Book piracy industry that does not exist today.

As we used to say in grade school - "Nice move, Ex-lax"

It's not extortion because they are not telling you to pay $x amount to "restore" anything. You can do that on your own.
post #14 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

I bought my iPhone from AT&T for $200
I pay my monthly AT&T bill of $113
I jailbreak my phone

Now, books I have purchased for ~$15 each are not viewable?

How is this not extortion? What I am doing (jailbreaking) is perfectly legal. What Apple has done, is denying me the ability to view a book I have legitimately paid for.

This is nothing short of extortion. Now, this will create a new effort by people to crack the DRM on iBooks; and when the DRM is broken on iBooks - this will create a new Book piracy industry that does not exist today.

As we used to say in grade school - "Nice move, Ex-lax"

You seem to be an unfortunate victim, but I refuse to believe that the majority of jailbreakers don't pirate. There are people who want to run a few utilities not on the App Store, yes. But considering the widespread issue of piracy in general, I would put money on the majority of jailbreakers do it to get games and other software illegally.
post #15 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

not a big deal but a bad move i think. if i bought a book let me read it, crack down on illegal copies instead.

Yep, I will no longer purchase any ebooks through Apple. I don't pirate apps or content, but I will buy through other sources.
post #16 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elian Gonzalez View Post

It's not extortion because they are not telling you to pay $x amount to "restore" anything. You can do that on your own.

They are telling you that you can not use the device that you paid for in the way that you want to, even though your method of use is perfectly legal and does not cause harm to Apple or others.
post #17 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by the cool gut View Post

Stop crying like a baby and thank your lucky stars Apple allows you to use a jailbroken iPhone at all.

I want to point out, Apple is not allowing them to use a jailbroken phone, the courts are. Apple wants a completely closed system to keep their 30% coming. It might not be extortion, but I would be interested in the usage agreement that you acknowledge when you download the app. I suspect that the policy might conflict with what the courts have said that the iphone must be open.
post #18 of 164
I'm not sure how pirating eBooks is a problem, you can technically do it without jailbreaking. ePub books are available all over and sync easily through iTunes.
post #19 of 164
As a developer I work long hours on my apps to make them good, and to attract legitimate purchasers to purchase the apps so that I can get a reasonable return for my efforts.

When I consistently see (as I do) that in excess of 25% of the running copies of my app are cracked (stolen) copies, it gives me reason to wish that Apple would come down much harder on the jailbreakers who facilitate app stealing, on the crackers who crack these apps, and on the websites that distribute them to the users who accept and use the stolen apps. Using stolen apps is no different than buying stolen cars, or from stealing the dollar bills directly out of my pocket.

Jailbreaking, while perhaps not illegal in itself, is the key that facilitates app stealing.
post #20 of 164
It's just me, or iBooks seems to be a mere POC for Apple JB-blocking code?

Instead of whining about DRMed books, we should start be scared of time when the majority of services within iOS are just nonfunctional on JB'ed devices...


It'll be a sub-cat and mouse game, inside a cat and mouse game...
post #21 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by the cool gut View Post

Stop crying like a baby and thank your lucky stars Apple allows you to use a jailbroken iPhone at all.

The law allows jailbreaking. It may be that what Apple has done is against the law. Time will tell.

It looks like it is better to download a pirated copy of a book to view in iBooks rather than purchase the same title in the iBookstore.
post #22 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post

Lets pay people for their hard work.

I agree with that, I'm not promoting stealing.
post #23 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

not a big deal but a bad move i think. if i bought a book let me read it, crack down on illegal copies instead.

Jail breaking is not just about piracy. SMB settings, weather icon, five icon dock, and soon turn by turn voice navigation in google maps are all good examples of jailbreak apps. some are even paid apps that developers make money from.

In addition its a play ground to test airplay hacks that are not authorized by apple, but harm no one but the crashed user's device.

Besides if only 2% are jailbroken how big of a piracy threat is it?

Cool. There's a great hobbiest platform called Android that you should be thrilled with.
Apple's selling to the other 98% of users who just want their device to work and are more than thrilled with the breadth of offerings already available.
post #24 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

I bought my iPhone from AT&T for $200
I pay my monthly AT&T bill of $113
I jailbreak my phone

Now, books I have purchased for ~$15 each are not viewable?

How is this not extortion? What I am doing (jailbreaking) is perfectly legal. What Apple has done, is denying me the ability to view a book I have legitimately paid for.

This is nothing short of extortion. Now, this will create a new effort by people to crack the DRM on iBooks; and when the DRM is broken on iBooks - this will create a new Book piracy industry that does not exist today.

As we used to say in grade school - "Nice move, Ex-lax"

This isn't extortion. Jailbreaking in this manner compromises built-in security measures on the phone. iBooks uses this API to ensure that purchased books are legitimate and not stolen (the basis of capitalism). Jailbreaking isn't illegal, but if you are messing with the innards of the OS to do it, you can expect some things to not work. It would be like messing around with your car's engine to get more horsepower and then bitching about the manufacturer when you blow a head gasket. Apple simply provides no warranty for you if you are going to mess with your phone's OS.
post #25 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by efithian@mac.com View Post

The law allows jailbreaking. It may be that what Apple has done is against the law. Time will tell.

It looks like it is better to download a pirated copy of a book to view in iBooks rather than purchase the same title in the iBookstore.

What Apple has done with iBooks is perfectly legal. They are allowed to discourage jailbreaking, they just can't prosecute anyone that does. Consider the DRM in iBooks just another obstacle to get past. Amazon is a better option for purchasing eBooks anyway.
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post #26 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbarriault View Post

You seem to be an unfortunate victim, but I refuse to believe that the majority of jailbreakers don't pirate. There are people who want to run a few utilities not on the App Store, yes. But considering the widespread issue of piracy in general, I would put money on the majority of jailbreakers do it to get games and other software illegally.

That would be interesting to find out.

Me, I run only 2 Apps on my Jailbroken iphone.
1. MyWi - I paid for 2 GB/month data; how I consume that 2GB is my business
2. WiFi Analyzizer - so I can see what WiFi spots are in the area

If I could purchase these through the App Store, I would. I see no reason to pay AT&T $20/month to connect MY phone to MY iPad. How I consume the dataplan I paid for, is my business, not theirs.

If AT&T charged you double for using a Speakerphone - no one would stand for it.
post #27 of 164
It's a token move. The book publishers are antsy about jailbreakers being able to pirate their books, so Apple has added this to keep them on side. Apple knows that the workaround will be trivial, and that it can't effectively enforce any security measures or DRM once the phone's been jailbroken. But sometimes being seen to act is more important than actually doing anything substantive.
post #28 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by jberry View Post

As a developer I work long hours on my apps to make them good, and to attract legitimate purchasers to purchase the apps so that I can get a reasonable return for my efforts.

You should definitely be paid for your work. I'm sure that if your app fits a need and is usable, it's got many sales already.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jberry View Post

When I consistently see (as I do) that in excess of 25% of the running copies of my app are cracked (stolen) copies, it gives me reason to wish that Apple would come down much harder on the jailbreakers who facilitate app stealing, on the crackers who crack these apps, and on the websites that distribute them to the users who accept and use the stolen apps. Using stolen apps is no different than buying stolen cars, or from stealing the dollar bills directly out of my pocket.

25% sounds high. You're assuming that they would buy it in the first place. Since Apple provides no app trials, I know people who use pirated apps as a way to try out an app before jumping in. Do you provide a "lite" version? Is it a fairly inexpensive application? I can't see anyone pirating a $.99 app...

Also, Apple has a super easy way to combat piracy - look at the tweaks and utilities that people jailbreak for and put similar technology into your OS. If iOS had SBSettings or BiteSMS (my two major jailbroken apps) I wouldn't jailbreak.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jberry View Post

Jailbreaking, while perhaps not illegal in itself, is the key that facilitates app stealing.

If you only knew that installing the apps/subsytem required to circumvent DRM is highly unstable on jailbroken phones and sometimes leads to having to restore the phone to factory settings.

Not all jailbreakers are thieves. Personally, I'd rather suppor the developer and get frequent updates. I jailbreak to add legal functionality to my already amazing phone.
post #29 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkichline View Post

This isn't extortion. Jailbreaking in this manner compromises built-in security measures on the phone. iBooks uses this API to ensure that purchased books are legitimate and not stolen (the basis of capitalism). Jailbreaking isn't illegal, but if you are messing with the innards of the OS to do it, you can expect some things to not work. It would be like messing around with your car's engine to get more horsepower and then bitching about the manufacturer when you blow a head gasket. Apple simply provides no warranty for you if you are going to mess with your phone's OS.

So, a 'Pre-emtive strike' on iBooks, for something I may, or may not do in the future; is justification for preventing me from accessing iBooks I have legitimately already paid for? Why not block the iPod functionality - just in case? Why not shut down my phone service, just in case?

Jailbreaking is LEGAL.
Denying me access to material that I have legitimately purchased is ILLEGAL.

Simple enough?
post #30 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by disesy View Post

I want to point out, Apple is not allowing them to use a jailbroken phone, the courts are. Apple wants a completely closed system to keep their 30% coming. It might not be extortion, but I would be interested in the usage agreement that you acknowledge when you download the app. I suspect that the policy might conflict with what the courts have said that the iphone must be open.

The courts have never been involved with deciding this issue. The US Copyright Office decided last year that jailbreaking doesn't violate the DMCA, which is quite a different matter. Apple has been quite clear from the start that jailbreaking voids your warranty. Go off the reservation, and you're on your own. This is the deal, and always has been -- accept it, or don't.
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post #31 of 164
Wah, wah wah!

All this griping and moaning about Apple protecting their brand image is really getting old. There are other brands of smartphone that allow all kids of application and OS functionality. Apple has not been, is not, nor will they ever be part of that crowd. EVERYONE knows it. Apple has made this very clear.

If the iPhone does not offer the functionality you want, then sell it and go purchase something else.

If Apple were the only smartphone manufacturer in existence, then the whiners would have an argument. As it stands, they're all just a bunch of crybabies.
post #32 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

Why not block the iPod functionality - just in case?

Don't you think that if Apple could make the iTunes store the only way to get music onto your phone, it would have done exactly that? But customers wouldn't stand for it - that horse bolted a long time ago.

iBooks, on the other hand, is still a closed platform, and Apple wants to keep it that way.
post #33 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetim View Post

What I hear apple saying here is they want me to buy kindle books from now on.

Nah. What you're really hearing is if you want to continue having a jail broken phone then expect parts of the platform that are add-ons not to work as if it were a phone still under warranty and liability by both parties.

You want to play ball then we've got a field. You want to control the ball then go build your own field.
post #34 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post

What Apple has done with iBooks is perfectly legal. They are allowed to discourage jailbreaking, they just can't prosecute anyone that does. Consider the DRM in iBooks just another obstacle to get past. Amazon is a better option for purchasing eBooks anyway.

Ummm - Jailbreaking MY iPhone is perfectly LEGAL.

Denying me access to iBooks that I have paid for, is theft.

Not all Jailbreakers are thieves, I know several jailbroken phones - and NOT ONE of them use stolen Apps.

I'd wager that 95% of Jailbreakers go to the effort, because of MyWi. MyWi simply turns on a function that is built into the iPhone, and is turned off by the cell provider. The Cell provider has opted to charge $20/month to enable something my phone has always been able to do. How I consume my 2 GB is MY business - not my cell phone providers.

Would anyone tolerate a $20/month surcharge to use your speakerphone?
post #35 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

So, a 'Pre-emtive strike' on iBooks, for something I may, or may not do in the future; is justification for preventing me from accessing iBooks I have legitimately already paid for? Why not block the iPod functionality - just in case? Why not shut down my phone service, just in case?

Jailbreaking is LEGAL.
Denying me access to material that I have legitimately purchased is ILLEGAL.

Simple enough?

ePubs is an open format and those purchased books can be used elsewhere.

Reading those books via iBooks isn't keeping you from reading those books from a 3rd party application that can be developed and support ePubs format.

You just won't get all the extra little touches like preview a book and then buy the book via iBooks without a third party having to develop those services that Apple developed for it's users, not for it's jailbroken users.

Get it?

Go get Stanza: http://www.lexcycle.com/
post #36 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euphonious View Post

Don't you think that if Apple could make the iTunes store the only way to get music onto your phone, it would have done exactly that? But customers wouldn't stand for it - that horse bolted a long time ago.

iBooks, on the other hand, is still a closed platform, and Apple wants to keep it that way.

By all means, keep iBooks closed. No arguement from this side of the fence. However, do not deny me the use of the iBooks I have paid for; simply because I opt to use MyWi.

Now, if Apple wants to refund my iBooks purchase - then I'll take my cash back and shut up.

In the meanwhile, all my future book purchases will be through Kindle. iBooks has a lot of polish - but Kindle doesn't deny me access to the books I have paid for. And when you have dropped over $100 on books - this is a big deal.
post #37 of 164
I have a jailbroken 3G iPhone. I paid my two years of service to AT&T and then moved out of the country. To continue to use my expensive iPhone I had to jailbreak it to unlock it and put another carriers SIM card in. Why should this be against Apple policy? Unless I want to toss my phone in a box and never use it this is the only way. Maybe Apple/AT&T should at least make an unlock code available once we have completed our contract. This just pisses me off every time it comes up.
BTW I have no pirated apps on my phone and there are quite a few other down here who have jailbroken/unlocked phones for the same reason and also do not pirate apps.
post #38 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

Ummm - Jailbreaking MY iPhone is perfectly LEGAL.

Denying me access to iBooks that I have paid for, is theft.

Have you read the terms and conditions that you agreed to before downloading anything from iTunes?

I certainly haven't - but I'd bet my hat that there's a clause in there which allows Apple to do exactly what it's done. The jury might be out on whether it's immoral, but illegal it ain't.

As with any DRM-protected content, you haven't paid for the content. You've paid for a license to make use of it under certain circumstances.
post #39 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by efithian@mac.com View Post

The law allows jailbreaking. It may be that what Apple has done is against the law. Time will tell.

It looks like it is better to download a pirated copy of a book to view in iBooks rather than purchase the same title in the iBookstore.

I'd just like to point out that "law allows jailbreaking" thing is technically inaccurate.

It was decided that distributing custom firmware onto the device wasn't violating copyright. There's a big difference. All it means is that Apple couldn't sue the Dev Team for copyright infringement. It doesn't mean that they have to allow jailbreaking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

I bought my iPhone from AT&T for $200
I pay my monthly AT&T bill of $113
I jailbreak my phone

Now, books I have purchased for ~$15 each are not viewable?

How is this not extortion? What I am doing (jailbreaking) is perfectly legal. What Apple has done, is denying me the ability to view a book I have legitimately paid for.

This is nothing short of extortion. Now, this will create a new effort by people to crack the DRM on iBooks; and when the DRM is broken on iBooks - this will create a new Book piracy industry that does not exist today.

As we used to say in grade school - "Nice move, Ex-lax"

You also agreed to various usage terms and conditions when signing up to get the phone, as well as when buying books from the iBooks Store. If you're not happy with the terms you signed up for, then don't agree to them. Simple as that.
post #40 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetim View Post

I agree with that, I'm not promoting stealing.

Bingo Steve. I'm quite happy to pay Apple for their extremely hard work! ATT, not so much!

Best
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