or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › iOS jailbreakers thwarted by Apple's latest version of iBooks
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

iOS jailbreakers thwarted by Apple's latest version of iBooks - Page 3

post #81 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by efithian@mac.com View Post

The law allows jailbreaking. It may be that what Apple has done is against the law. Time will tell.

It looks like it is better to download a pirated copy of a book to view in iBooks rather than purchase the same title in the iBookstore.

Jailbreaking may be legal, but Apple is under no obligation to give you access to protected content post-jailbreak.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #82 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinemagic View Post

One jailbroken app I use is iBlacklist. My cell phone is my primary phone. Unfortunately for me, telemarketers have my number. A few have refused to take me off their list and I get calls all the time. AT&T won't block calls but will still charge me for the minutes used when these telemarketers do call. Apple doesn't allow me to block calls and they have not allowed any apps that do block calls into the app store. Jailbreaking and iBlacklist is the only solution if I want to be able to block telemarketers. And yes, I am on the Do Not Call Registry, which is useless. Maybe the user experience that Steve Jobs envisions is full of telemarketing. But for me, it's not. This is real, not a hypothetical. As for pirated books, there is no justification for that. But it seems that the anti-jailbreakers think that everyone who jailbreaks is out to pirate apps or steal something. Nothing could be further from the truth.

You can't effectively call block telemarketers on landlines, so it beats me how you can do it on a mobile phone, with or without the app.
Please don't be insane.
Reply
Please don't be insane.
Reply
post #83 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

You need a hearing aid then.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #84 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinemagic View Post

Yes, you are absolutely right. I did buy as you pointed out. I still feel cheated.

Absolutely. I was just pointing out that the common perception of people that they have bought a book when they buy an ebook isn't correct in the case of an Apple DRM ebook. It's just a license, subject to whatever terms Apple wants (or transitively, whatever terms the publisher wants Apple to want).
post #85 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuisDias View Post

This is why I hate copyright. The whole shenanigans Apple and so many corporations have to do to ensure that intellectual work behaves like private property in a "proper" capitalist market are nothing short of ensuring an enslaving world, in the name of "security" and the "market", where our freedoms are completely destroyed.

This particular issue is just a small detail. But it is quite telling.

Without copyright and patent protections in place, the economic incentive for creating content and inventions disappears and you end up with a non-competitive market as developed as Afghanistan.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #86 of 164
Yes! Please do it! Please SELL YOUR iPHONE AND BUY A DROID/KINDLE/ANDROID WHATEVER and quit your whining!!

Enough with the idle threats about leaving iBooks and iOS! DO IT!
post #87 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Without copyright and patent protections in place, the economic incentive for creating content and inventions disappears and you end up with a non-competitive market as developed as Afghanistan.

Quote:
To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.

That would be a quote from Article I of the U.S. Constitution. You'd think that would settle the basic issue, but it somehow never does.
Please don't be insane.
Reply
Please don't be insane.
Reply
post #88 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

Let the whining begin.

What possible justification is there for jail breaking in order to pirate a book? Yet, there are those who through tortured logic or by setting up ridiculously improbable hypotheticals will find a justification, or merely assert their right to "do whatever I want because I bought it."

Others like to hack everything as some climb a mountain: "just because it's there."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinemagic View Post

One jailbroken app I use is iBlacklist. My cell phone is my primary phone. Unfortunately for me, telemarketers have my number. A few have refused to take me off their list and I get calls all the time. AT&T won't block calls but will still charge me for the minutes used when these telemarketers do call. Apple doesn't allow me to block calls and they have not allowed any apps that do block calls into the app store. Jailbreaking and iBlacklist is the only solution if I want to be able to block telemarketers. And yes, I am on the Do Not Call Registry, which is useless. Maybe the user experience that Steve Jobs envisions is full of telemarketing. But for me, it's not. This is real, not a hypothetical. As for pirated books, there is no justification for that. But it seems that the anti-jailbreakers think that everyone who jailbreaks is out to pirate apps or steal something. Nothing could be further from the truth.

I was really only addressing jailbreaking specifically to pirate books. I recognize that there are valid reasons, such as yours. Thanks for broadening the discussion.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #89 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinemagic View Post

So jailbreaking is legal. I purchased books from Apple and Apple has now made it impossible for me to read these books as long as I legally jailbreak. Well, now I'll simply buy from Amazon, use the Kindle reader (on the iPad) and piss on Apple's iBooks. And yes, jailbreaking IS legal. You need to read the statement from the US Government's Library of Congress. If it is not illegal, then it is legal. It is legal to do ANYTHING that is not specifically declared illegal (US Constitution). Unless you live in another country, it's not hazy at all. Now once jailbroken, it becomes easy to do illegal acts like use pirated software. I don't thing there's anyone that will contend that pirated software is legal or moral to use in any fashion. This ability is one reason Apple fights jailbreaking. Apple's desire to control 100% of the user experience is another.

It is correct that Apple is under no obligation to cater to jailbroken devices. They can and do everything they can to block jailbreaking. My gripe right now is that I paid Apple for books. I paid Apple for my iPhone and iPad. By blocking me, I feel that Apple has stolen my money. I didn't steal any of their software, hardware or anything else. The two Cydia apps I have I also paid for. Cydia has not cheated me. But now Apple has cheated me. Allow me to get a refund for books I purchased through iBookstore and I'll be happy.

Good grief, jailbreakers are tiresome. If you don't like it, take your business to Android and bother us no more.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #90 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by efithian@mac.com View Post

The law allows jailbreaking. It may be that what Apple has done is against the law. Time will tell.

It looks like it is better to download a pirated copy of a book to view in iBooks rather than purchase the same title in the iBookstore.

So you profess what IS the law and if Apple doesn't abide by the law then it is better to download a "pirated copy"... isn't that AGAINST the law?!...

So if Apple "breaks" the law (which I don't believe they have), entitles you to break the law. Hmmm.

Two side notes:

First, it appears there are a lot of well Read people with Jailbroked iPhones here on AI. I have yet to buy from the iBook store. Did download a few free ones that I have yet to read, tho.

Second, the law used to allow for the purchase and selling of slaves. Some laws are just wrong, long before politicians get around to making them right.
/
/
/

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

Reply

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

Reply
post #91 of 164
Redacted.
post #92 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

That would be a quote from Article I of the U.S. Constitution. You'd think that would settle the basic issue, but it somehow never does.

I think it really comes down to one issue. People will always want something for nothing and they'll do anything to serve their own interests first. This is a given and Apple recognizes this fact by allowing thousands of free apps on their App Store to encourage content gluttons to feed until sick.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #93 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

That would be a quote from Article I of the U.S. Constitution. You'd think that would settle the basic issue, but it somehow never does.

Amen, Doc. The constitution, "love it or leave" as they used to say.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #94 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

Ummm - Jailbreaking MY iPhone is perfectly LEGAL.

Denying me access to iBooks that I have paid for, is theft.

Not all Jailbreakers are thieves, I know several jailbroken phones - and NOT ONE of them use stolen Apps.

I'd wager that 95% of Jailbreakers go to the effort, because of MyWi. MyWi simply turns on a function that is built into the iPhone, and is turned off by the cell provider. The Cell provider has opted to charge $20/month to enable something my phone has always been able to do. How I consume my 2 GB is MY business - not my cell phone providers.

Would anyone tolerate a $20/month surcharge to use your speakerphone?

There is no legal requirement for Apple to support your jailbroken device. Jailbreaking being legal means you can't be prosecuted for doing so, not that Apple has to ensure your device is fully functional after you do so. They haven't denied you access to your books. That's something you did when you jailbroke the device.

I agree that tethering charges are ridiculous, but Apple isn't stealing anything from you by adding another layer of protection against jailbreaking. I'm pretty sure you've only licensed the books from Apple anyway and jailbreaking definitely goes against the terms of service.

I'm not saying Apple is doing the right thing, I'm saying they have the right to do this.
The key to enjoying these forums: User CP -> Edit Ignore List
Reply
The key to enjoying these forums: User CP -> Edit Ignore List
Reply
post #95 of 164
Quote:
"There is a problem with the configuration of your iPhone," the error message in iBooks 1.2.1 reads. "Please restore with iTunes and reinstall iBooks."

A vaguely worded error message like that reminds me of the equally vague error message that Windows betas issued back in the 1990s when they detected competitor, Dr. DOS, on a PC. A clear message would have told users that the only reason it was appearing was to crush a competitor whose product was actually compatible. A vague message left them feeling that there was something wrong with Dr. DOS. Having created FUD, Microsoft turned off that error message in the shipping version of Windows.

This seems to be the same sort of game. A proper error message would honestly state, "To ensure copy protection, iBooks will not run on iPhones that have been jail-broken."
post #96 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

I think it really comes down to one issue. People will always want something for nothing and they'll do anything to serve their own interests first. This is a given and Apple recognizes this fact by allowing thousands of free apps on their App Store to encourage content gluttons to feed until sick.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

Amen, Doc. The constitution, "love it or leave" as they used to say.

A person could argue that the patent and copyright laws have become subject to abuse, and I might agree -- but for a person to say they hate the very concept? Even the founders understood that protecting ideas was critically important to the civil society they hoped to create.
Please don't be insane.
Reply
Please don't be insane.
Reply
post #97 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

SJailbreaking is LEGAL.
Denying me access to material that I have legitimately purchased is ILLEGAL.

Simple enough?

Depending on the terms you agreed to when you made the purchase it isn't necessarily so, tough titty pal, time to move on and whine somewhere else.

If you break it it's your responsibility, Apple gives you a way to continue using your iBooks, the choice is yours.

Simple enough?
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #98 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbarriault View Post

You seem to be an unfortunate victim, but I refuse to believe that the majority of jailbreakers don't pirate. There are people who want to run a few utilities not on the App Store, yes. But considering the widespread issue of piracy in general, I would put money on the majority of jailbreakers do it to get games and other software illegally.

I have a jailbroken 3GS. I pay for ALL of my apps!!!! I also buy my music on iTunes nowadays. I have no desire to steal software. I want to see hard data that shows the actual numbers of jailbroken phones that have stolen apps on them.

I have only bought 2 books on iBooks. Mostly I used it for view PDFs. Now I will buy from Amazon and use Goodreader, etc.

Thanks Apple, I hope it is worth it to alienate customers. By the way, I think there is already a hack for this nonsense on Cydia.
post #99 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinemagic View Post

So jailbreaking is legal. ..... And yes, jailbreaking IS legal. You need to read the statement from the US Government's Library of Congress. If it is not illegal, then it is legal..

Please read Prof P's comments @ http://forums.appleinsider.com/showp...1&postcount=66

and FT @ http://forums.appleinsider.com/showp...5&postcount=80

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinemagic View Post

It is legal to do ANYTHING that is not specifically declared illegal (US Constitution). Unless you live in another country, it's not hazy at all......

Then are murder, rape, child abuse, and pillaging legal acts? Slavery was also "legal" until it was abolished by the 13th Amendment to the Constitution.

Treason is one illegal act that is defined in the Constitution:
Quote:
Article III, Section 3
1: Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort.

....the others are not. These crimes are found in each state's civil, penal, business & professional etc codes & laws. The laws of the US are found in US Codes. Cornell's site @ http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
post #100 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

As we used to say in grade school - "Nice move, Ex-lax"

Were you in Special Ed?

The phrase is "smooth move, Ex-Lax."
post #101 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfkw View Post

...Maybe Apple/AT&T should at least make an unlock code available once we have completed our contract. This just pisses me off every time it comes up...

This option exists on carriers in countries where the governments have legislated so.

Get involved and talk to the politicians to make it so.
post #102 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by jubei_nj View Post

I'm not sure how pirating eBooks is a problem, you can technically do it without jailbreaking. ePub books are available all over and sync easily through iTunes.


Where? and tell me how, thanks, I'm tired of paying these prices
post #103 of 164
iBooks is so far behind Kindle that apple is having to force out the competition to give iBooks a shot. You are much better off not updating your iOS and jailbraking, after apples move what do you gain? Now I can use a wide selection of book apps from different vendors, if i play apples game I can use only one. One they have exclusive rights to, one that has less content, one that is alot more difficult to find a non-top ten release in, one that works only in apples stable. If I don't play apples game, I have book apps that work on my mac, pc, blackberry, web, android, Symbian, and windows phone. Hmmm, they have more content for cheaper, easier to find and sync last page read across devices, and also work with one click purchase. The choice seems clear, don't update your device, jail break it, and have a much better and more capable device.
post #104 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Quote:
To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.

That would be a quote from Article I of the U.S. Constitution. You'd think that would settle the basic issue, but it somehow never does.

PREAMBLE
Quote:
We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

The Preamble of the Constitution does not confer any powers to any portion of the Federal Government.

Article I defines the Legislative branch and powers delegated to it.
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
post #105 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkling View Post

A vaguely worded error message like that reminds me of the equally vague error message that Windows betas issued back in the 1990s when they detected competitor, Dr. DOS, on a PC. A clear message would have told users that the only reason it was appearing was to crush a competitor whose product was actually compatible. A vague message left them feeling that there was something wrong with Dr. DOS. Having created FUD, Microsoft turned off that error message in the shipping version of Windows.

This seems to be the same sort of game. A proper error message would honestly state, "To ensure copy protection, iBooks will not run on iPhones that have been jail-broken."

Vaguely worded?

It is a very concise message with the inclusion of how to fix it.

I don't recall DOS errors including instructions on how to fix them.
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #106 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by jberry View Post

As a developer I work long hours on my apps to make them good, and to attract legitimate purchasers to purchase the apps so that I can get a reasonable return for my efforts.

Yes. As a jailbreaker, I agree with you. I'm also a content producer and developer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jberry View Post

When I consistently see (as I do) that in excess of 25% of the running copies of my app are cracked (stolen) copies, it gives me reason to wish that Apple would come down much harder on the jailbreakers who facilitate app stealing, on the crackers who crack these apps, and on the websites that distribute them to the users who accept and use the stolen apps. Using stolen apps is no different than buying stolen cars, or from stealing the dollar bills directly out of my pocket.

Right. Apple should stop selling iPhones because they're used to pirate your apps. Apple should stop selling computer, and ISPs should shut down. That's how silly it sounds. Jailbreaking != piracy any more than any of these other things. Apple could go after warez sites and apps like Installous, but also as a developer, you should consider looking at how your can deal with the issue of piracy yourself. It's really not that hard.

First, take a look at the 25%. How much of that is really hurting you? There's a good percentage of that who never would've paid for your app to begin with, but their use may contribute to influencing others to buy. Likewise of that 25%, a percentage will like the app and then buy it later. Here's a hint: update often and require more recent versions of iOS.

Finally, take a look at what others are doing through code to prevent piracy. Be nice about it. Let your app continue to run in Trial mode until purchased or serve ads and nag messages.

If you really want to take a hard line, don't let your app run at all, or pollute the warez scene with bad cracks.

Really, it's not that hard to combat, but you may find that doing so causes more harm than good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jberry View Post

Jailbreaking, while perhaps not illegal in itself, is the key that facilitates app stealing.

There's no perhaps about it. Jailbreaking an iPhone is not illegal. The key that facilitates app stealing is actually stealing the app. That's the crime. Cracking apps, posting cracked apps, etc... that's all illegal with the sole purpose of committing a crime. Jailbreaking no more facilitates the act of the crime than buying an iPhone, using a computer, having an internet, etc... Jailbreaking, like any of these other things, provides all kinds of features and functionality that is perfectly legal and causes harm to no one.
post #107 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by lamewing View Post

I have a jailbroken 3GS. I pay for ALL of my apps!!!! I also buy my music on iTunes nowadays. I have no desire to steal software. I want to see hard data that shows the actual numbers of jailbroken phones that have stolen apps on them.

I have only bought 2 books on iBooks. Mostly I used it for view PDFs. Now I will buy from Amazon and use Goodreader, etc.

Thanks Apple, I hope it is worth it to alienate customers. By the way, I think there is already a hack for this nonsense on Cydia.

Of course you do, everyone does and I only use Bit torrent for Open Office.

The world is a wonderful place full of kind and gentle people.
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #108 of 164
The Kindle Store already has a significantly better selection of books than iBooks, so all this does is force more users to Amazon. This doesn't have anything to do with DRM or Amazon would have to do the same thing. This is just Apple busting chops over the 100s of 1,000s who have jailbroken their phones.
post #109 of 164
There are other reader apps besides iBooks but I wouldn't buy from amazon I'd get epubs.

Amazon ebooks only read from kindle or kindle app. Better to buy ePub which will read from every reader except kindle.

When iBooks gets fixed, it'll play those epubs.

And while your at it, check out Good Reader app for .PDFs. Awesome.
2011 13" 2.3 MBP, 2006 15" 2.16 MBP, iPhone 4, iPod Shuffle, AEBS, AppleTV2 with XBMC.
Reply
2011 13" 2.3 MBP, 2006 15" 2.16 MBP, iPhone 4, iPod Shuffle, AEBS, AppleTV2 with XBMC.
Reply
post #110 of 164
Jailbreaking is indeed legal. There are no guarantees that all other legitamate functions need to be supported once jailbroken.

In other words, it's also legal for Apple to not fully support JBd devices.
post #111 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Without copyright and patent protections in place, the economic incentive for creating content and inventions disappears and you end up with a non-competitive market as developed as Afghanistan.

The few thousand years of recorded human history where no copyright and patent protection exist, yet literature and scientific discovery were actively pursued, and competitive market existed seem to counter this argument.
post #112 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetim View Post

What I hear apple saying here is they want me to buy kindle books from now on.

Why should we even consider buying iBooks, when they can't even be read on a Mac? I guess Apple is now confident the Mac and Windows versions of iBooks will be available by the June deadline for third parties?
post #113 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

PREAMBLE

The Preamble of the Constitution does not confer any powers to any portion of the Federal Government.

Article I defines the Legislative branch and powers delegated to it.

I'm sorry, was there a point to this remark? The text is precisely where I said it was, and is precisely what I said it was. Perhaps you have some novel theory about what it means.
Please don't be insane.
Reply
Please don't be insane.
Reply
post #114 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeltsBear View Post

Jailbreaking is 100% legal. Using jailbreaking to steal is not. VCR's are legal. Taping a pay per view and selling it is not. Almost everything on the planet has an illegal use...

This is pretty much what I said, but the analogy you are using would be better stated as:

- VCR's are legal. Buying a VCR with intent to do something illegal is also perfectly legal.

but on the other hand:

- Jailbreaking is legal. Jailbreaking with intent to do something illegal, is illegal.

So in the case of jailbreaking your *intent* matters, whereas you can buy a VCR anywhere and what you intend to do with it is your own business.
post #115 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

This is pretty much what I said, but the analogy you are using would be better stated as:

- VCR's are legal. Buying a VCR with intent to do something illegal is also perfectly legal.

but on the other hand:

- Jailbreaking is legal. Jailbreaking with intent to do something illegal, is illegal.

So in the case of jailbreaking your *intent* matters, whereas you can buy a VCR anywhere and what you intend to do with it is your own business.

Yep. I agree.

Buying a car is legal, but buying a car with the intent to drive it off a cliff and collect insurance is illegal. Car manufacturers, however, don't stop cars from driving TO cliffs. That seems to be the rub here.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #116 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post

There is no legal requirement for Apple to support your jailbroken device. Jailbreaking being legal means you can't be prosecuted for doing so, not that Apple has to ensure your device is fully functional after you do so. They haven't denied you access to your books. That's something you did when you jailbroke the device.

That's categorically incorrect. They have denied users access to their books based on the status of their phone. This didn't happen because the device was jailbroken. This happened because Apple checked for the existence of the jailbreak and actively disabled functionality.
post #117 of 164
This is now a NON-issue:
See PwnageTool 4.2:
http://blog.iphone-dev.org/
post #118 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

I'm sorry, was there a point to this remark? The text is precisely where I said it was, and is precisely what I said it was. Perhaps you have some novel theory about what it means.

Just correcting a minor technicality. You stated that the quote was found in Article I, and it's not. The quote used a portion of the Preamble which is separate from Article I. Also it was not a direct quote from the Preamble. If I'm incorrect, please direct me to the paragraph in Article I you reference.

Article I starts:

Quote:
Article. I. Section. 1. All legislative Powers herein granted shall be
vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.......

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/constitutio...nstitution.pdf
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
Reply
post #119 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

Just correcting a minor technicality. You stated that the quote was found in Article I, and it's not.

It most certainly is. Section 8 of Article I.
Please don't be insane.
Reply
Please don't be insane.
Reply
post #120 of 164
Too bad iBooks will get fixed by the jailbreakers. It is a very simple fix and so i can continue to buy my books just like usual.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › iOS jailbreakers thwarted by Apple's latest version of iBooks