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Apple cofounded effort to help design and build $2 billion New Sanford Hospital

post #1 of 28
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This month, Apple joined eBay, HP, Intel, Intuit and Oracle in an "unprecedented" joint philanthropic effort to help Stanford Medical Center build a new $2 billion hospital, designed to use the latest technology available in ways mirroring the innovation of Silicon Valley tech companies.

Members of the new Stanford Hospital Corporate Partners Program expect to contribute $150 million over the next decade and plan to raise an additional $400 million in private donation to construct the new project.

More than just contributing resources, the partners will work with New Stanford Hospital planners to develop innovative new approaches to providing patient access, information, education and navigation, a program that "has the ability to change the face of health care," according to Stanford Hospital president and chief executive Amir Dan Rubin.

The project balances new technical innovations with the goal of creating a healing environment "responsive to the emotional, social and psychological needs of patients, families, visitors, medical professionals and staff," said a report by the hospital.

The new complex will supply 600 beds, new intensive care and emergency services, state of the art imaging systems, and a garden floor supplying dining, conference and educational space.



Steve Jobs, chief executive of Apple, said "all of us are very fortunate to have Stanford's world-class medical center right here in Silicon Valley. We are very excited about the development of their new hospital and really want to support their plans."

Speaking about the project, Ron Johnson, Apple's senior vice president of retail, said "they have to solve the problem of 'how do you make what's intimidating, welcoming?' I think Apple's been able to do that through a series of great products, from computers to iPods to phones now. I don't think it's been done well in the healthcare field. And that's the opportunity of the New Stanford Hospital."

Johnson added, "the science in the hospital is the highest level of science that's done in the world. And perhaps done for the most important reason: to provide life. What we're doing is really changing the way people interface with the hospital.

"If you look at the history of Stanford health care, the products that have been created here and their impact on the world is much greater than Apple: radiation therapy used to cure cancer, the MRI. Because that's what you want to do here. You want to enable great new scientific discovery to come to the forefront. You want people to be healed like they couldn't be healed before. And who knows if it will be regeneration or stem cells or what the application will be, but the speed at which things are moving, the work we do today will have a profound impact on our families and people throughout the world. And that's what makes it fun to be a part of."

In an overview video posted by Stanford's YouTube page, Johnson says, "the whole idea behind the Stanford Hospital Corporate Partners Program is to unite the pioneering companies of the Silicon Valley with the New Stanford Hospital to create methods of taking care of patients that really haven't been imagined yet." He noted that the original Stanford hospital was built 50 years ago during the Eisenhower Era, "that was the same time that many of the great companies were just planting their seeds."

Johnson said that companies surrounding the hospital have since grown up with it, "and I think they believe that they can give back. And the impact will be profound."

Planning of the new hospital has been in progress for five years, and construction is expected to take another six, with work slated to begin later this year. A report by the hospital notes that "the new inpatient facility will retain the close proximity of Stanford Hospital to the Stanford School of Medicine, where discoveries ranging from gene splicing to the first report of the successful use of monoclonal antibodies to treat cancer emerged.

"In September 2010, the School of Medicine opened the new Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge, a transformative environment for medical education, followed by the October 2010 opening of the new Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building, the largest dedicated stem cell research building in the country, if not the world."

post #2 of 28
Sounds cool.
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post #3 of 28
Fred Sanford: You just dumb, son. You just dumb.

post #4 of 28
How about changing "Sanford" in the headline and first paragraph to "Stanford".
post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Model A1181 View Post

How about changing "Sanford" in the headline and first paragraph to "Stanford".

Agreed. Normally, I ignore grammar and spelling mistakes, but sir, you've gone too far!
post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Model A1181 View Post

How about changing "Sanford" in the headline and first paragraph to "Stanford".

How about accepting the fact that typos sometimes happen and being a little less snotty about it.
post #7 of 28
cool .
post #8 of 28
Cool! And they say Apple isn't philanthrophic..
post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

..... Stanford Hospital to the Stanford School of Medicine,... opening of the new Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building, the largest dedicated stem cell research building in the country, if not the world."

Yeah, while we ponder over the pathetically legalized, politicized nature of stem cell research in the US (executive orders notwithstanding): http://stemcells.nih.gov/
post #10 of 28
A good deed does not need publicity, that's what I'll say

OTH, I suppose eBay could have some 'bid-for-your-organ' corner somewhere in there.. or ask you if you want to donate to their stake of the hospital when you're paying for your winning items.. I know I'll be drinking Apple's revolutionary iKool-aid when I'm there
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobodyy View Post

How about accepting the fact that typos sometimes happen and being a little less snotty about it.

Nah, it's Stanford we're talkin' about.

Just like:
West Point should not be called "West Punt"
Harvard is not "Harbored"
Annapolis is a far cry from "Anyoldplace"
and the USCGA... Umm.
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobodyy View Post

How about accepting the fact that typos sometimes happen and being a little less snotty about it.

Sometimes happen? Twice in succession?

When someone corrects a mistake they deserve thanks, not reproach. If you think they're being snotty, save yourself the thanks and keep quiet. Otherwise the next wise guy will snap at you, and then there'll be no end to the bickering...
post #13 of 28
This is really cool. I was born at Snodfart Medical Center back in the day. Great to see this happening there.

Whoops, I meant "Stanford", not "Snodfart". Typo!
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

Sometimes happen? Twice in succession?

When someone corrects a mistake they deserve thanks, not reproach. If you think they're being snotty, save yourself the thanks and keep quiet. Otherwise the next wise guy will snap at you, and then there'll be no end to the bickering...


AMEN!

Personally, I would want to be corrected when wrong, just for the sake of making things right! It's only snotty in how the one who goes about correcting you, does it.

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Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobodyy View Post

How about accepting the fact that typos sometimes happen and being a little less snotty about it.

i'll call bull#@!* on your statement. it happens all the time, every day on appleinsider. want to be a professional publication? take the extra time to proof-read and edit.
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"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

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post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobodyy View Post

How about accepting the fact that typos sometimes happen and being a little less snotty about it.

That's right.

Professional journalism died in the early Nineties. We shouldn't be nitpicking tech bloggers over minutiae like this. All the great news writers are six feet under.
post #17 of 28
Looks pretty FUG if you ask me. Either go modern with glass or go classical with greek columns. Don't just build 4 brown boxes.
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post #18 of 28
all the snotty remarks by people on ai... i'm heading to macrumors... adios
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post #19 of 28
"the science in the hospital is the highest level of science that's done in the world."
The general public might think so.
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

Looks pretty FUG if you ask me. Either go modern with glass or go classical with greek columns. Don't just build 4 brown boxes.

Agreed! That is FUG. If Apple's part of it, at least get the designers to put in their 2 cents. But wait, the glass would easily break...
post #21 of 28
That is some seriously uninspiring architecture. I hope it's because the money is going to the equipment and staff.
post #22 of 28
Will the hospital take MediCal and Medicare patients? How about patients with no medical insurance flooding its ER? How long will it take before the costs of seeing patients begin to outweigh what little reimbursement it gets from the state government, insurance companies and HMOs that refuse to cover all sorts of office visits, medicines and procedures?
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtamesis View Post

Will the hospital take MediCal and Medicare patients? How about patients with no medical insurance flooding its ER? How long will it take before the costs of seeing patients begin to outweigh what little reimbursement it gets from the state government, insurance companies and HMOs that refuse to cover all sorts of office visits, medicines and procedures?

Our problem is not the lack of tertiary medical facilities... we have enough of those. It is affording insurance, prescriptions, getting coverage for pre-existing conditions, etc. An ER visit can put somebody in bankruptcy if they do not have insurance. Most so called non profits cost even more.
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splash-reverse View Post

A good deed does not need publicity, that's what I'll say

I think that is exactly Steve Jobs' standard philosophy about philanthropy, yet all the blind haters out there accuse him of being a Scrooge compared to Bill Gates, whose style of philanthropy is much more in-your-face.

Oh, "Snodfart". Why is it that Cal people always have to put their two bitter cents in to any discussion pertaining to Stanford? Petty jealously, most likely. For the record, I'm a Peninsula native who didn't attend Stanford or Cal (though I did graduate from another UC school). I was a neutral most of my life, but the chip-on-the-shoulder attitude of many Cal fans is just too much for me to bear (no pun intended!).

And I agree 100% that the architecture is disappointingly lame. But I guess I'd rather they spend the money on high tech toys than on a Frank Gehry or Santiago Calatrava or whoever.
post #25 of 28
Looks great!

However; "If you look at the history of Stanford health care, the products that have been created here and their impact on the world is much greater than Apple: radiation therapy used to cure cancer, the MRI."

Pedantically; a number of scientists claim to have invented MRI; none worked at Stanford.

Peter Mansfield, at the University of Nottingham (UK) was rewarded with the 2003 Nobel Prize for discoveries concerning MRI.
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtamesis View Post

Will the hospital take MediCal and Medicare patients? How about patients with no medical insurance flooding its ER? How long will it take before the costs of seeing patients begin to outweigh what little reimbursement it gets from the state government, insurance companies and HMOs that refuse to cover all sorts of office visits, medicines and procedures?

Talk about "finding the cloud behind every silver lining" .... jeeeze louise even!
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post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

That is a very generous gift and I hope it results in a lot of good. But at the same time, Stanford is already one of the wealthiest universities in the country and I doubt their hospital is lacking for too much. I would think that instead of giving $2 billion to one single hospital, imagine how many more people could have been helped had they split that money to possibly a hundred or more poorer hospitals around the country that really need basic medical equipment to help their patients. $2B could have bought a lot of MRI, ECG, and other life saving equipment for many poorer hospitals that either lack that equipment or are using machines that are literally falling apart. Seems like a case of some rich companies helping a rich hospital that didn't even need the money.

I think you're missing the point here. It seems to me that Apple & friends are trying to help design, from the ground up, a medical facility that takes advantage of the very latest in hi-tech available. If done properly, there's no doubt in my mind that the level of efficiency and success will increase to the point that that knowledge will be included in future designs. That can only help the whole medical profession. In other words .... Apple is trying to "skate where the puck is going to be .... rather than where it is".
See, in the record business, you can show someone your song, and they don’t copy it. In the tech business, you show somebody your idea, and they steal it. (Jimmy Iovine)
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See, in the record business, you can show someone your song, and they don’t copy it. In the tech business, you show somebody your idea, and they steal it. (Jimmy Iovine)
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post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbee View Post

Talk about "finding the cloud behind every silver lining" .... jeeeze louise even!

I work in a so called modern health care center, and while it has a lot of the latest whiz-bang technology, a health care facility is only as good as the people running it and is useful to patients only if they can afford its services, which is dictated by their insurance companies.
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