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Intel details Thunderbolt, says Apple has full year head start - Page 4

post #121 of 132
I am skeptical about them putting Thunderbolt on the iPad. For the simple reason of practicality. The majority of iPad buyers are either PC users or have an existing Mac. None of these people will use this port anytime soon. In fact, it's possible that they might not use this port during the lifetime of their iDevice (or until the very end of it). So most users would be stuck with a port that takes up space but does nothing. Or compels you to use adpators, which would annoy most people. I am willing to bet that most users would rather have a USB connection which lets them plug in their iDevice to any computer than a Thunderbolt connection which they would have little opportunity to use.

Apple has foresight to be sure. But I don't think they'd try to piss off their customers. Moreover, it's one thing to tack on another port on a desktop or a laptop. It's another matter to use a rare connection standard on one of two connection ports on a mobile device (in Apple's case, both not common).

In a year or two though....completely different story.
post #122 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

I am skeptical about them putting Thunderbolt on the iPad. For the simple reason of practicality. The majority of iPad buyers are either PC users or have an existing Mac. None of these people will use this port anytime soon. In fact, it's possible that they might not use this port during the lifetime of their iDevice (or until the very end of it). So most users would be stuck with a port that takes up space but does nothing. Or compels you to use adpators, which would annoy most people. I am willing to bet that most users would rather have a USB connection which lets them plug in their iDevice to any computer than a Thunderbolt connection which they would have little opportunity to use.

Apple has foresight to be sure. But I don't think they'd try to piss off their customers. Moreover, it's one thing to tack on another port on a desktop or a laptop. It's another matter to use a rare connection standard on one of two connection ports on a mobile device (in Apple's case, both not common).

In a year or two though....completely different story.

The iPad could come with a cable that's Thunderbolt at one end and USB at the other...

But, I'd be willing to bet that if Apple includes an iPad Thunderbolt port, and allows external devices (cameras, thumb derive, etc.) to be connected -- 3rd-party manufacturers would stumble over themselves supplying Thunderbolt cables to their devices.


Apple is estimated to sell 40 million iPads in 2011 (I believe it will be over 60 million). But. let's take the 40 number -- that would mean maybe 30 million iPad 2s with Thunderbolt -- that's a pretty good size target market! Not to mention other new iDevices.
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post #123 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

I am skeptical about them putting Thunderbolt on the iPad. For the simple reason of practicality. The majority of iPad buyers are either PC users or have an existing Mac. None of these people will use this port anytime soon. In fact, it's possible that they might not use this port during the lifetime of their iDevice (or until the very end of it). So most users would be stuck with a port that takes up space but does nothing. Or compels you to use adpators, which would annoy most people. I am willing to bet that most users would rather have a USB connection which lets them plug in their iDevice to any computer than a Thunderbolt connection which they would have little opportunity to use.

Apple has foresight to be sure. But I don't think they'd try to piss off their customers. Moreover, it's one thing to tack on another port on a desktop or a laptop. It's another matter to use a rare connection standard on one of two connection ports on a mobile device (in Apple's case, both not common).

In a year or two though....completely different story.

I don't see how adding a port would annoy users. Adding a port at this point wouldn't be about mass adoption, it would be about demoing capabilities.

You say the port would be useless to most, but many people have an HD TV at home and could benefit from mini DisplayPort through a simple mini DisplayPort to HDMI adapter. iOS devices not even supporting 720p video out is a bit of a short coming right now (in before AirPlay comments).
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post #124 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post

I don't see how adding a port would annoy users. Adding a port at this point wouldn't be about mass adoption, it would be about demoing capabilities.

You say the port would be useless to most, but many people have an HD TV at home and could benefit from mini DisplayPort through a simple mini DisplayPort to HDMI adapter. iOS devices not even supporting 720p video out is a bit of a short coming right now (in before AirPlay comments).

I agree with this!

I was going to add the following as an edit to my prior post:

1) I don't follow the PC hardware -- but I think most PCs and laptops have the requisite PCI interface slot in their motherboards. If true, many existing PCs could, with a Thunderbolt adapter, take immediate advantage of the technology -- Apple's advantage is that the adapter will be built-in to all Macs (next refreash).

2) If there are apps running on PCs that could benefit from an iPad co-peripheral (as I described earlier) then these would be great targets for sales of software, hardware, connectors and iPads..


In my history with computers I have had the privilege to experience, first hand, several revolutions -- where the capability was so compelling that it was the only way to go. Cost was not an issue -- the results were not practical any other way!

Apple ][ and VisiCalc -- a $79 program that sold many $3,000 plus computers to run it.

Mac and the LaserWriter -- a $10,000 plus package that created the Desktop Publishing industry.


I believe the joining of the iPad with the Mac (or PC) is another one of these revolutions.

I believe the AutoCads, the PhotoShops and, yes, the Final Cuts have seen what loosely-connected iPads and computers can do... and understand the potential of more tightly joining them as co-peripherals.


That's just the creatives -- haven't even considered the enterprise, educational, medical, defense and gaming potential of co-joined computing.
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post #125 of 132
Hopefully some of your ideas do come to fruition. The iPad could definitely be a great asset for productivity on the mac.
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post #126 of 132
When will they realize these new fangled connections don't last, and go back to LocalTalk?
post #127 of 132
Ethernet, as a backwards compatible connector, has survived a long time. 15 years at least.
post #128 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmsimmer View Post

It will take a year for Dell to find used Thunderbolt parts to put into their machines.

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post #129 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Me? I love everything. Why would you assume there was a complaint embedded in that comment?

After re-reading my post, it's obvious to me that the fact that the first 4 posters were all complaining about the story, and the time of day for me was later in the PM (when my blood sugar gets down to the "bitchy" level) .... I let that dictate the tone of my reply to you. I was wrong for that and you have my apology.
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post #130 of 132
Why do you not READ the article?
Nothing about exclusivity.
Nothing about Apple blocking anything.
Just everybody else sitting on his fat ass waiting to see if this is successful and then decide to join.

You blame the wrong company!
post #131 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hauerg View Post

Why do you not READ the article?

We did.

Quote:
Nothing about exclusivity.

It was edited.

Quote:
Nothing about Apple blocking anything.

It was edited.

Quote:
You blame the wrong company!

You blame the wrong posters.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #132 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Me too, Firewire is far better than USB 2.

Specs sometimes lie. Even though USB 2.0 is supposed to be rated at 480 and the original Firewire is rated at a lower 400, the Firewire beats the USB 2.0 in real life usage, such as when using external drives. Firewire (400) has better sustained throughput and is faster than USB 2.0.

In addition, every packet on USB requires processing by the CPU, impacting your overall system performance the more you send data. Firewire controllers are able to handle the transaction without host CPU involvement, freeing more processing for your applications. This also means that realtime transfers (synchronous data) is really synchronous - no dropped frames in your video. The synchronous data in USB is just mostly synchronous.
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