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thunderbolt

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
As a newbee please tell me exactly what does Thunderbolt perform if you are an average computer user like myself?Do you need more cables to use this?thanks
post #2 of 18
It's a new port. You obviously need new cables. And new computers. And new hard drives, gadgets, and accessories to take advantage of it.

It's backwards compatible (with adapters) with existing accessories, but obviously won't give you Thunderbolt speeds with non-Thunderbolt devices.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

It's a new port. You obviously need new cables. And new computers. And new hard drives, gadgets, and accessories to take advantage of it.

It's backwards compatible (with adapters) with existing accessories, but obviously won't give you Thunderbolt speeds with non-Thunderbolt devices.

You are talking about a lot of money here to use this.thanks sir
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

You are talking about a lot of money here to use this.thanks sir

$5 for an adapter. Not a big deal.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #5 of 18
First, Thunderbolt has replaced the Mini DisplayPort on the side of the new MBPs. Any existing or previously purchased Mini DisplayPort-compatible cable/adapter will work with the new Thunderbolt port.

What's the difference? Two big things: speed and daisy-chaining. For example, if you buy a new Thunderbolt-compatible external drive (say, the upcoming LaCie Little Big Disk), then you plug your Thunderbolt cable into your port on your MBP and into your port on your external drive, and you get 10Gbps transfer speeds- that's twenty times as fast as USB. Then, say if you have an Apple LED Cinema Display, you can plug that into the second port on your backup drive. (That's the daisy-chaining).

Go to apple.com/thunderbolt to get more info.

Quote:
$5 for an adapter. Not a big deal.

I think marvfox was referring to the claim that you would "obviously need new cables. And new computers. And new hard drives, gadgets, and accessories to take advantage of it." Really, if you purchase a Thunderbolt-enabled MBP (granted, a large cost in itself) with a $200 backup drive... not that much for 30-second backups. I know I'll be getting it this summer...
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

$5 for an adapter. Not a big deal.

That's quite a price drop :

http://forums.appleinsider.com/showp...8&postcount=62

I suspect with TB being an Intel-backed standard that adaptors may be cheaper more quickly. I wonder if other manufacturers will have to adopt MDP too. That would be an interesting scenario.

Quote:
Originally Posted by liamd27

Really, if you purchase a Thunderbolt-enabled MBP (granted, a large cost in itself) with a $200 backup drive... not that much for 30-second backups.

Thunderbolt will only max the transfers up to the speed of the drive. FW800 already does this for platter drives, although eSATA can get slightly faster actual rates. You'll only see a large benefit to backups with an SSD backup and an SSD internal. You'd probably get a 128GB SSD for $200 though and if your internal is within that and an SSD then the backups will be quick. Still likely 1/5th what TB offers though even with SSD.

Thunderbolt won't do much for say a 1TB platter backup of a 1TB platter internal. At best you're talking a 20% improvement over FW800.

The immediate consumer benefit of TB is as a docking solution - one plug for display, backup drive, mouse/keyboard, printer etc. The high speed will be a benefit when the drive manufacturers catch up and get SSD prices down.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

That's quite a price drop :
http://forums.appleinsider.com/showp...8&postcount=62

What can I say, I'm a sucker for Monoprice.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamd27 View Post

First, Thunderbolt has replaced the Mini DisplayPort on the side of the new MBPs. Any existing or previously purchased Mini DisplayPort-compatible cable/adapter will work with the new Thunderbolt port.

What's the difference? Two big things: speed and daisy-chaining. For example, if you buy a new Thunderbolt-compatible external drive (say, the upcoming LaCie Little Big Disk), then you plug your Thunderbolt cable into your port on your MBP and into your port on your external drive, and you get 10Gbps transfer speeds- that's twenty times as fast as USB. Then, say if you have an Apple LED Cinema Display, you can plug that into the second port on your backup drive. (That's the daisy-chaining).

Go to apple.com/thunderbolt to get more info.



I think marvfox was referring to the claim that you would "obviously need new cables. And new computers. And new hard drives, gadgets, and accessories to take advantage of it." Really, if you purchase a Thunderbolt-enabled MBP (granted, a large cost in itself) with a $200 backup drive... not that much for 30-second backups. I know I'll be getting it this summer...

Correct if you do not own of these other components you mentioned than this thunderbolt is not that important to a average computer user like myself.The real key is your IPS connection right?
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

Correct if you do not own of these other components you mentioned than this thunderbolt is not that important to a average computer user like myself.The real key is your IPS connection right?

Well, by asking what you could use Thunderbolt for, I was assuming you realized the cost of a new computer was necessary; my point was if you had purchased a computer with Thunderbolt (obviously you can't use Thunderbolt accessories without a Thunderbolt computer), then a $200/300 backup drive for the speed and daisy-chaining wouldn't necessarily be out of the question.
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamd27 View Post

Well, by asking what you could use Thunderbolt for, I was assuming you realized the cost of a new computer was necessary; my point was if you had purchased a computer with Thunderbolt (obviously you can't use Thunderbolt accessories without a Thunderbolt computer), then a $200/300 backup drive for the speed and daisy-chaining wouldn't necessarily be out of the question.

I just purchased a new MBP 13 inch 3 weeks ago with the core 2 duo processor.This does not have the port Thunderbolt.Would i have to buy a new MBP with Thunderbolt now and sell mine? Thanks
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

I just purchased a new MBP 13 inch 3 weeks ago with the core 2 duo processor.This does not have the port Thunderbolt.Would i have to buy a new MBP with Thunderbolt now and sell mine? Thanks

100% yes. You can't add Thunderbolt to a laptop that doesn't have it. Intel would have you believe you can't add Thunderbolt to a desktop that doesn't have it, either.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

I just purchased a new MBP 13 inch 3 weeks ago with the core 2 duo processor.This does not have the port Thunderbolt.Would i have to buy a new MBP with Thunderbolt now and sell mine? Thanks

It's unfortunate that you purchased a new computer 2 weeks before the refresh. Within 14 (or is it 10 now?) days of purchase at an Apple Store you can take your computer back, and they'll give you 100% money back. If you tried now they might do it, since the hardware launch was just last week... (or at least with a restocking fee)
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamd27 View Post

It's unfortunate that you purchased a new computer 2 weeks before the refresh. Within 14 (or is it 10 now?) days of purchase at an Apple Store you can take your computer back, and they'll give you 100% money back. If you tried now they might do it, since the hardware launch was just last week... (or at least with a restocking fee)

We returned our Core Duo iMac for a Core 2 Duo of the same size after they came out and we had purchased exactly one month prior.

They'll very likely take it back.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

We returned our Core Duo iMac for a Core 2 Duo of the same size after they came out and we had purchased exactly one month prior.

They'll very likely take it back.

They told me NO at the store because I have it for over 2 1/2 weeks already.They told me to get the new 15 inch MBP which is much better than mine now. I guess I am stuck.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

They told me NO at the store because I have it for over 2 1/2 weeks already.They told me to get the new 15 inch MBP which is much better than mine now. I guess I am stuck.

:c Well, lesson learned, I suppose... if you're going to purchase a new Apple device, check the rumors for upgrades. FYI, iPhone is June, iPods/TV/iTunes is September, iPad is (?)March, and there's always some kind of new MacBook in October. MBP is usually April, so it was rather a surprise they did it in February this year.\\

If you still have the original box and packaging and the computer is in like new condition, you might try to sell it on Ebay/CL... you could probably get pretty close to what you paid for it.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

They told me NO at the store because I have it for over 2 1/2 weeks already.

Screw the store; they're never on top of things, anyway. We e-mailed customer relations and had the entire transaction handled digitally. We shipped it back on our own and they shipped out the replacement.

Don't give up just yet!

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Screw the store; they're never on top of things, anyway. We e-mailed customer relations and had the entire transaction handled digitally. We shipped it back on our own and they shipped out the replacement.

Don't give up just yet!

But that was, what, 5 years ago? Steve probably told them to crack down since then.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

As a newbee please tell me exactly what does Thunderbolt perform if you are an average computer user like myself?Do you need more cables to use this?thanks

Would you like to transfer a Blu Ray movie in 30 seconds. Backup up TB harddrives rapidly.

Thunderbird addresses these current, and future, long range needs of speed and connectivity (really two high speed channels in one connector... video and data transfer and signalling... and interfacing via a hubbing arrangement in other devices in the serial chain that in turn connects to a wide variety of older and current technologies (ethernet, USB 1.1, 2.0, 3.0, SATA, Firewire, vga, DVI, HDMI, etc)

One small, dual channel connector can interface with all kinds of devices, display, controllers, and storage, along with interfacing other computers. Each getting what it can understand at the ability of the device ... but also the newer devices (many are coming) can also get what they need ... all in this elegant cable concept. This takes time, money and standardization and acceptance by the community. Standardization is the key here.

Apple implemented TB in the new Macbook Pro series (first computer ever). Not likely to be used in iPAD (touch screen tablet technology ... no PCI express architecture for now).
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