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Inside Mac OS X 10.7 Lion: New Dock, Finder & Desktop

post #1 of 143
Thread Starter 
Mac OS X 10.7 Lion reverses a trend toward user interface complexity, delivering a desktop computing environment that not only incorporates graphical elements of iOS, but also copies the intuitive simplicity of Apple's mobile operating system.

This overall simplification of the Lion user interface doesn't strip away existing features as much as it streamlines the process of using them, making it easier to actually access the power of various components. Two prime examples are Dashboard, a widget feature added in 10.4 Tiger, and Spaces, a virtual desktops feature Apple added to 10.5 Leopard.

While both features added new kinds of functionality to the Mac OS X desktop, they also involved more complexity, requiring users to remember special key commands to invoke and dismiss them while also creating new modes that can be difficult for non-technical users to visualize and comprehend. For many users, that complexity barrier simply means that Apple's development efforts go untapped.

In Mac OS X Lion, Dashboard and Spaces are integrated visually into the "all windows" view of Exposé, which Apple is now calling Mission Control. Additionally, the concept of Full Screen Apps is expanded into what is essentially a single app Space, which like Dashboard and other defined Spaces, is just as easy to call up and then escape from with a four-fingered swipe of the trackpad.

A simpler new Dashboard

Under Lion, instead of depicting Dashboard as a special mode that whisks in above the desktop as a visual overlay, the widget layer simply a panel that slides in from the left (evoking the left-most strip of audio playback and screen orientation lock controls accessible from the iOS multitasking bar).

This strips the desktop of some whizzy eye candy (including the watery layer that since Tiger has rippled when you drag out a new Dashboard widget, and the translucent background of the Dashboard itself), but it simplifies the user experience so that its very easy to remember how to get in and out of the Dashboard interface quickly; it can even be done via an intuitive multitouch gesture (very similar to the one Apple is experimenting with as an iPad gesture for switching between its full screen apps).

There's now no distractingly busy desktop behind your Dashboard widgets, just a simple panel that looks like a starting point for constructing Lego buildings. The Widget strip from Tiger is still there for grabbing new widgets to arrange in the Dashboard area, and the Dock is always available as well, making it even easier to jump back out to a particular app. Movie on page two.

On page 2 of 4: Automatic Spaces and Mission Control.

Automatic Spaces and Mission Control

Apple indicated that it worked hard in Leopard to deliver a new virtual desktop feature without introducing too much additional complexity. The problem, however, is that virtual desktops are innately confusing for most users because they act as modal representations of parallel worlds, each with its own desktop of icons.

Apple's implementation, named Spaces, shares the same desktop for each Space, merely grouping a set of app windows (or apps themselves) into different screens. Spaces work for power users who switch between different types of tasks, but they're confusing for most users because there's an explicit, invisible step required to move between each space.

Mission Control, a renaming and enhancement of the F9-invoked "all windows" Exposé screen, simplifies Spaces by making it visually simple to see each space in the context of running apps and all document windows. An important part of this simplification is the use of multi-fingered gestures to navigate through the screens visually. This makes Spaces much easier to visualize and navigate between.





On page 3 of 4: Full Screen Apps.

Full Screen Apps

Additionally, Apple has added Full Screen controls to content-oriented apps such as Mail, Safari, iPhoto, and iCal which effectively turn their single window into a full screen app reminiscent of the iPad. When an app goes full screen, it creates a private space for itself rather than simply obscuring other windows. This allows the user to take specific apps full screen and then easily switch between them, the Desktop, Dashboard, and other defined Spaces using intuitive gestures.

In Lion, apps lose the upper right pill icon, with many now getting a Full Screen button that takes the window and turns it into a fully utilized private space. This also trims away the window's title bar and close buttons, erasing all the windowing chrome to present just the app's functions with as broad of an open canvas as possible. To jump out of Full Screen, the user can mouse up to display the hidden Menu Bar, where a new Full Screen button in the top right returns the app into its normal window view. Or alternatively, the use can swipe between full screen apps, Dashboard, the Desktop and other Spaces via gestures.

Integrating Full Screen Apps, Spaces, Dashboard and Exposé, Mission Control is a welcomed point of Singularity that builds upon ideas that have been evolving within Mac OS X over the past decade, and within the iOS, iPhone and iPad over the last few years, finally delivering a cohesive, intuitively familiar way for non-technical users to handle several desktops of active content without getting lost looking for key commands, keyboard shortcuts, or mousing around through menus.





On page 4 of 4: Launchpad, Finder icon dragging.

Launchpad

One final step in merging the iPad experience with the Mac OS X desktop is Launchpad, a new app that simply blurs the Mac desktop out and displays an array of app icons very similar to the iPad Home page. Multiple screens of apps can be slid between with a two-fingered swipe navigation, each with rows of icons that can be grouped into iOS-style Folders by dragging them on top of each other.

There's no need to touch and hold apps to enter a "jiggle" mode in order to rearrange them; the user can simply click and drag apps into their preferred location, or within organizing Folders. Using Launchpad is still a bit rough around the edges, with some remaining quirks related to dragging apps around, and no obvious way to remove apps you don't want to appear. The app shows every application you have installed within your Applications folder, so there is currently going to be a lot of stuff you probably don't want to access quickly.

Despite its work in progress status, Launchpad is a welcomed improvement over trying to find an app (that's not in your Dock) manually, particularly for users who don't understand the concept of digging through the filesystem to locate a program, and aren't aware they can use Spotlight to call up an app by name (or for users who want to launch an app they recognize by icon, but can't recall the name). The new feature is essentially the Applications folder as a Dock Stack, but with more simplicity and familiar commonality with iOS.

Finder icon dragging

In addition to the flexible new window controls that appear everywhere in Lion, and the new source list and view controls present in the Finder, the new update also enhances how selections of files are dragged between or within Finder windows.

New in Lion, when a selection of files is dragged to the source sidebar, or to the desktop, or to another window, the selection is represented as a collection, badged with a count of the items in the selection, and with a display that transforms to reflect the view settings it is dragged over.

For example, a selection of icons dragged to the source sidebar is shifted to a set of small icons listed in a an easily readable row, but when dragged to the desktop, the icons morph into larger sized representations in a stack. Dragged to a different Finder window, the same stack takes on the characteristics of its destination.



post #2 of 143
Really nice write-up, and the screencasts are sharp! thanks!

This'll be an interesting release (to discuss and to have), so much focus on usability and 'editorial' ui decisions. And the OS keeps evolving.
post #3 of 143
Maybe I missed something, but the title implies there was new features to the Dock, but nothing is said about it.
post #4 of 143
One thing this means is that all new Macs will ship with some sort of trackpad/mouse, like the laptops have. Apple's committing big to gestures now, it's officially part of the user interface.
post #5 of 143
Am I the only one who thinks that dumbing down a system for people who don't want to learn how to use their computer is bad? AppleInsider, stop sucking off Apple. There are no "complex key commands" for Spaces, it's ctrl+arrow keys. Apparently, because I still use a keyboard, I am no longer part of Apple's target audience. Similarly, there is absolutely nothing hard about "Macintosh HD --> Applications" to find all of my programs. The only problem with this is that OS X hides mounted disks on the desktop by default, which is idiotic anyway.
My 50 year old mother, who clicks and drags scroll bars because she doesn't know how to use a scroll wheel, can use Spotlight to find anything because it is literally that easy.

Also, I bought a MacBook Pro with a 17" display for a reason. Making things like iTunes, iCal, and Mail be full-screen apps is fucking stupid, and a waste of the 2.3 million pixels on my screen. I love Apple, but they need to get it together,

And finally, fuck gestures. Keyboard shortcuts are faster and easier, and require less movement.
17" i7 Macbook Pro (Mid 2010), Mac Mini (early 2006), G3 B&W, G3 Beige Tower, 3 G3 iMacs (original, bondi, snow), Power Mac 7600/132, Power Mac 7100/100, Power Mac 6100/60, Performa 5280, Performa...
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post #6 of 143
By default now the dock doesn't show the lights for running apps, although you can turn these back on.

Mission Control is really very, very nice, especially if you're a heavy Spaces user

Here's a tip: each Space can now have it's own desktop picture. It's a little cumbersome to set them, as you have to open, or drag, the System Preferences on each Space separately. Worth it tough, as it makes it easy to tell them apart.

It does seem now that Spaces are just in a linear order, instead of being in a grid, which could make navigation lots of spaces a bit harder, although it also makes things a lot easier to understand for the majority of users
post #7 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

One thing this means is that all new Macs will ship with some sort of trackpad/mouse, like the laptops have.

Why? The Mac Pro's gonna have a mouse for a decent long while yet.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #8 of 143
@ AppleInsider,

Thank you for not requiring the Flash plug-in for watching videos.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #9 of 143
Either a million people are watching those videos or your server is running on an iBook. It shouldn't take 5 minutes to load a 30 second video.
post #10 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post

Am I the only one who thinks that dumbing down a system for people who don't want to learn how to use their computer is bad? There are no "complex key commands" for Spaces, it's ctrl+arrow keys. Apparently, because I still use a keyboard, I am no longer part of Apple's target audience.

God, c'mon, they are just adding more options to do stuff. I actually find it easier to use gestures because my hand is already probably in the trackpad (when I'm not writing). And it's not the fact that it's 'complex', but it can be made faster & easier for those who prefer gestures.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post

Similarly, there is absolutely nothing hard about "Macintosh HD --> Applications" to find all of my programs.

Again, it's not that it's hard or complex to go to Macintosh > Applications (though I'm sure there are people that cannot do it), but calling up Launchpad with gestures (just like calling Expose, showing the Desktop, and all the other 3 finger swipes) can make something faster and/or easier FOR SOME who prefer gestures.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post

And finally, fuck gestures. Keyboard shortcuts are faster and easier, and require less movement.

I find gestures a more natural and faster way to do stuff. Besides, it's not like they took out the option to do it with Keyboard shortcuts, or did they?
post #11 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post

Am I the only one who thinks that dumbing down a system for people who don't want to learn how to use their computer is bad? AppleInsider, stop sucking off Apple. There are no "complex key commands" for Spaces, it's ctrl+arrow keys. Apparently, because I still use a keyboard, I am no longer part of Apple's target audience. Similarly, there is absolutely nothing hard about "Macintosh HD --> Applications" to find all of my programs. The only problem with this is that OS X hides mounted disks on the desktop by default, which is idiotic anyway.
My 50 year old mother, who clicks and drags scroll bars because she doesn't know how to use a scroll wheel, can use Spotlight to find anything because it is literally that easy.

Also, I bought a MacBook Pro with a 17" display for a reason. Making things like iTunes, iCal, and Mail be full-screen apps is fucking stupid, and a waste of the 2.3 million pixels on my screen. I love Apple, but they need to get it together,

And finally, fuck gestures. Keyboard shortcuts are faster and easier, and require less movement.

You sound like MS-DOS advocates in 1990. In any case, all of the features you hate are optional. Keyboard shortcuts still work, an application enters full-screen when the user decides, etc.
post #12 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post

Am I the only one who thinks that dumbing down a system for people who don't want to learn how to use their computer is bad? AppleInsider, stop sucking off Apple. There are no "complex key commands" for Spaces, it's ctrl+arrow keys. Apparently, because I still use a keyboard, I am no longer part of Apple's target audience. Similarly, there is absolutely nothing hard about "Macintosh HD --> Applications" to find all of my programs. The only problem with this is that OS X hides mounted disks on the desktop by default, which is idiotic anyway.
My 50 year old mother, who clicks and drags scroll bars because she doesn't know how to use a scroll wheel, can use Spotlight to find anything because it is literally that easy.

Also, I bought a MacBook Pro with a 17" display for a reason. Making things like iTunes, iCal, and Mail be full-screen apps is fucking stupid, and a waste of the 2.3 million pixels on my screen. I love Apple, but they need to get it together,

And finally, fuck gestures. Keyboard shortcuts are faster and easier, and require less movement.

Have fun in 1985 cowboy.
post #13 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post

Am I the only one who thinks that dumbing down a system for people who don't want to learn how to use their computer is bad? AppleInsider, stop sucking off Apple. There are no "complex key commands" for Spaces, it's ctrl+arrow keys. Apparently, because I still use a keyboard, I am no longer part of Apple's target audience. Similarly, there is absolutely nothing hard about "Macintosh HD --> Applications" to find all of my programs. The only problem with this is that OS X hides mounted disks on the desktop by default, which is idiotic anyway.
My 50 year old mother, who clicks and drags scroll bars because she doesn't know how to use a scroll wheel, can use Spotlight to find anything because it is literally that easy.

Also, I bought a MacBook Pro with a 17" display for a reason. Making things like iTunes, iCal, and Mail be full-screen apps is fucking stupid, and a waste of the 2.3 million pixels on my screen. I love Apple, but they need to get it together,

And finally, fuck gestures. Keyboard shortcuts are faster and easier, and require less movement.

just don't use the new features

Steve
- sent from my iPhone
post #14 of 143
Out of interest have you guys heard of NDAs?

Either you're breaking one yourself or assisting someone else break one.
post #15 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulSorensen View Post

Out of interest have you guys heard of NDAs?

Either you're breaking one yourself or assisting someone else break one.

I actually haven't heard of anyone talk about Lion's NDA - I don't think it exists.
post #16 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post

Am I the only one who thinks that dumbing down a system for people who don't want to learn how to use their computer is bad? AppleInsider, stop sucking off Apple. There are no "complex key commands" for Spaces, it's ctrl+arrow keys.

Er... that's complex!
I tried Lion out today and loved it - very intuitive. Might actually start using Spaces and Expose at last, as well as widgets.

Keyboard shortcuts are still there if you want them and if you don't like gestures, you'll see little real difference.
New books out now! www.jonathanbaldwin.co.uk
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New books out now! www.jonathanbaldwin.co.uk
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post #17 of 143
Worrying.

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #18 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbarriault View Post

I actually haven't heard of anyone talk about Lion's NDA - I don't think it exists.

I think you are mixing up NDA and DNA...
post #19 of 143
Am I the only one who finds Mission Control a bit unintuitive. Sure, it's for power users, but Apple usually makes even powerful stuff simple. You'd know it's beta.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #20 of 143
I have to admit it. I am starting to like Lion a lot.
post #21 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

One thing this means is that all new Macs will ship with some sort of trackpad/mouse, like the laptops have. Apple's committing big to gestures now, it's officially part of the user interface.

Good question. I was wondering about that as well. A lot of this isn't so easy without a trackpads. But how easy will it be to convince most people to learn all of this?
post #22 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post

Am I the only one who thinks that dumbing down a system for people who don't want to learn how to use their computer is bad? AppleInsider, stop sucking off Apple. There are no "complex key commands" for Spaces, it's ctrl+arrow keys. Apparently, because I still use a keyboard, I am no longer part of Apple's target audience. Similarly, there is absolutely nothing hard about "Macintosh HD --> Applications" to find all of my programs. The only problem with this is that OS X hides mounted disks on the desktop by default, which is idiotic anyway.
My 50 year old mother, who clicks and drags scroll bars because she doesn't know how to use a scroll wheel, can use Spotlight to find anything because it is literally that easy.

Also, I bought a MacBook Pro with a 17" display for a reason. Making things like iTunes, iCal, and Mail be full-screen apps is fucking stupid, and a waste of the 2.3 million pixels on my screen. I love Apple, but they need to get it together,

And finally, fuck gestures. Keyboard shortcuts are faster and easier, and require less movement.

Please watch your language! I'm not going to delete it as so many have already quoted it. But please don't do it again.
post #23 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Please watch your language! I'm not going to delete it as so many have already quoted it. But please don't do it again.

Thanks, melgross.

I find the gratuitous repeated use of the "f" word to add nothing to a discussion. It simply reflects poorly upon the one whose vocabulary is so restricted that he cannot express his views with more appropriate language.

John
post #24 of 143
Has anybody got some chill pills? MS-DOS advocate I think is perfect.

More to the point, apparently, there are many people who don't think thoroughly before they post their comments.

All the features discussed here are actually in addition to and are optional. Plus, I'm confident there are some developers out there who share your view and would do something about it.
post #25 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post

Am I the only one who thinks that dumbing down a system for people who don't want to learn how to use their computer is bad? AppleInsider, stop sucking off Apple. There are no "complex key commands" for Spaces, it's ctrl+arrow keys. Apparently, because I still use a keyboard, I am no longer part of Apple's target audience. Similarly, there is absolutely nothing hard about "Macintosh HD --> Applications" to find all of my programs. The only problem with this is that OS X hides mounted disks on the desktop by default, which is idiotic anyway.
My 50 year old mother, who clicks and drags scroll bars because she doesn't know how to use a scroll wheel, can use Spotlight to find anything because it is literally that easy.

Also, I bought a MacBook Pro with a 17" display for a reason. Making things like iTunes, iCal, and Mail be full-screen apps is fucking stupid, and a waste of the 2.3 million pixels on my screen. I love Apple, but they need to get it together,

And finally, fuck gestures. Keyboard shortcuts are faster and easier, and require less movement.

With all due respect, you're utterly and completely clueless about how the majority of people use and interact with a computer, as well as their abilities and willingness to use and discover features. I deal with these people everyday, and those who use keyboard shortcuts are a minority. I know several people with macs who didnt even know about spotlight, nor where to find t
post #26 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

One thing this means is that all new Macs will ship with some sort of trackpad/mouse, like the laptops have. Apple's committing big to gestures now, it's officially part of the user interface.

You mean like http://www.apple.com/magictrackpad/?
post #27 of 143
Could someone explain why I can't see the videos, please. I am using Firefox 3.6 on my Mac with Snow Leopard. Interestingly, I can see the videos in Safari. Do I need a plug-in or something? All I get is a grey box with an 'X' in the middle.
post #28 of 143
I have to admit. Lion does seem to be growing on me. Apple has never really let me down in the innovation department. Well, except that tiny iPod Nano. That was dumb. But in terms of software intuition, this looks pretty promising. Like they're getting ready to take their next big leap ahead of Windows.

Of course, that kind of sucks for Windows users, cause you know Dell is going to be bundling third party software to mimic Macs and it's just going to slow things down even more.

But, I'm still a bit anxious. I'm definitely a power user, and I find very little useful about gestures as I need more precision and comfortable longevity than a trackpad seems to provide me. I'm also a die hard fan of spaces and it's worked its way into my muscle memory now. Hopefully, if I don't like the changes, there might be a way to switch to the classic mode or something.

Also, to add to the discussion of Mr. DOS' comment, it's really difficult as a computer savvy person to understand how someone less savvy doesn't get it. But, I know plenty of people who simply don't use the beef of Apple's workflow innovations because they just don't spend enough time on the computer to really get used to it all. And, if you're used to Windows XP or something earlier, you've grown quite accustomed to never, ever searching your computer for something because it will literally take hours and no one needs a picture of their poodle that badly. So, I'm betting when people get to Mac, search functionality isn't even on their radar.

All this stuff looks like it's going to be a pretty big improvement.

But I have to wonder, if they're only at 10.7, and they're dubbing this version 'Lion', does that mean it's technically the end of the OS X line? I mean, in the chain of big cats, I don't think you can get much higher than Lions.
post #29 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by petruzzo View Post

But I have to wonder, if they're only at 10.7, and they're dubbing this version 'Lion', does that mean it's technically the end of the OS X line? I mean, in the chain of big cats, I don't think you can get much higher than Lions.

There's always the Sabretooth!
post #30 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Please watch your language! I'm not going to delete it as so many have already quoted it. But please don't do it again.

My apologies. Will not happen again. Though, for what it's worth, "f***" (which i see enough people here using) is no less offensive than actually spelling the word out.

But I stand by my original points: probably 90% of apps do not need to be full-screen on a Mac, ever. Apple should focus on adding features like Hyperdock's window-arranging features, or a multitude of other things that I can't think of right now, before adding a useless full-screen iCal, or a redundant Launchpad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

With all due respect, you're utterly and completely clueless about how the majority of people use and interact with a computer,as well as their abilities and willingness to use and discover features.

I work in the IT field at a big university. I help these people every day, and I know exactly how they use computers. I also know that very few people are willing to try to figure out how to do anything by themselves, and I never said anything to the contrary. People should learn how to use their computers though.
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post #31 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post

My apologies. Will not happen again. Though, for what it's worth, "f***" (which i see enough people here using) is no less offensive than actually spelling the word out.

But I stand by my original points: probably 90% of apps do not need to be full-screen on a Mac, ever. Apple should focus on adding features like Hyperdock's window-arranging features, or a multitude of other things that I can't think of right now, before adding a useless full-screen iCal, or a redundant Launchpad.


I work in the IT field at a big university. I help these people every day, and I know exactly how they use computers. I also know that very few people are willing to try to figure out how to do anything by themselves, and I never said anything to the contrary. People should learn how to use their computers though.

People 'should' learn how to use their computers, fine, but they won't. Plain and simple. Either they're not curious enough, too ignorant, or just plain don't care, but thats the truth. So whats the bottom line then? They simply will not be aware, or will be too troubled to use 90% of the features of an OS. Using the argument of 'they should' is silly. I just find it odd how you're so up in arms about Apple giving users another way to do things, a way that may just be more intuitive and thus have a higher chance of being used. I don't see anything like keyboard shortcuts being stripped out, and your frustration is utterly irrational. This is something that will probably benefit the MAJORITY of users, not geared towards people like us who visit apple fansites and post on message boards (although I personally like everything I see in Lion). ios devices have had wild success for their ease of use, and it makes sense for Apple to exploit some of these new paradigms for the desktop. They're adding functionality and discoverability, not removing them.
post #32 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

One thing this means is that all new Macs will ship with some sort of trackpad/mouse, like the laptops have. Apple's committing big to gestures now, it's officially part of the user interface.

Magic Mouse has a track pad on top already. Hopefully it will be able to accommodate all that is required in Lion.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #33 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbarriault View Post

There's always the Sabretooth!

Yeah, the original Snow Lion
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #34 of 143
JakeTheRock, you're not addressing the point of full screen. It's not just to isolate the app with no distractions -- I agree that not all apps need that kind of undivided attention. A full screen app creates its own dedicated space. In the grand universe of the new OS X "desktop", that means that you can quickly swipe from space to space, from app to app very easily.

Contrary to your argument, I find that casual users will never use a keyboard shortcut, but will quickly adopt gestures. I don't know how many times I've had to show friends the CMD+Q shortcut only to see them still go to the dock or menu to look for the Quit command. Gestures on the other hand are easily learned and adopted long term. The 2 finger scroll is genius!

As a pro user myself, I find myself using gestures instead of keyboard shortcuts more and more. I still use shortcuts when I'm working in Aperture, but navigating the OS, I barely touch my keyboard now.

As for LaunchPad, I think it's the most important UI addition to OSX since the Dock. 1 button (or a gesture) on your Mac will bring forward your favourite apps and as quickly disappear out of sight. No more overcrowded dock. No more workaround using a stack. No more typing your app into Spotlight. No more opening a Finder window, hitting Applications and scrolling to your app -- does anybody still do that?

The world of terminal commands and keyboard shortcuts is quickly being outmodernized by touch gestures and UI. One can remain closed minded and be left behind or join the future, where the majority of people will live. JakeTheRock, I find it amusing how you feel so threatened by innovation. Don't worry, your terminal and shortcuts will still be there where you can find it and the rest of us can forget about.
post #35 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post


I work in the IT field at a big university. I help these people every day, and I know exactly how they use computers. I also know that very few people are willing to try to figure out how to do anything by themselves, and I never said anything to the contrary. People should learn how to use their computers though.

Your experiences show why Apple are wisely making everything simpler and more intuitive. Learning 'how' has to be separated from 'learning complex stuff just because we IT people feel needed when they can't'.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #36 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post

AppleInsider, stop sucking off Apple.

I'm likely doing a bad thing responding to a troll, but grow up. Phrase your opinions like an adult and someone might listen or and or care.
post #37 of 143
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Originally Posted by mbarriault View Post

There's always the Sabretooth!

Don't forget about the mysterious Liger!
post #38 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeTheRock View Post

Am I the only one who thinks that dumbing down a system for people who don't want to learn how to use their computer is bad?

In a way I agree with you.

I can understand wanting to make things more iOS for the switchers that are used to their phones and such.

But I have been at this since System 7. Do I have the option to not use these features and to have things scroll, swipe etc like a normal computer.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #39 of 143
I thought most of what was shown in those videos looked terrible.

- The dashboard background idea. This means having to click another app to come out of it.
- Mission Control doesn't look that great with the little windows and big one at the bottom. The current Exposé is much better IMO.
- the menu system overlapping the title bar of a full-screen app and moving the spotlight icon in fullscreen mode. Have they got a Windows UI designer working on this now?
- icons reshuffling based on context, why would you need that? It's distracting as you move things and you are going to think that you've let go the mouse or something by accident.

This is not what I imagined this system to be like at all. I guess I'd get used to it but so far I don't like it much beyond the scrollbars.

With more gestures, I hope they stick the trackpad onto the keyboards in future though as long as they keep the numpad.
post #40 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

In a way I agree with you.

I can understand wanting to make things more iOS for the switchers that are used to their phones and such.

But I have been at this since System 7. Do I have the option to not use these features and to have things scroll, swipe etc like a normal computer.

Yet, there's a reason why you're not still using System 7... There's always a segment of users that resist change and then eventually fall in line and would refuse to go back to the older way of doing things.

Nonetheless, Lion will allow you to get your old scroll bars back and keyboard shortcuts will still be there like they are today. If you don't want to use gestures, don't.
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