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Apple granted invention of scratch-proof nitride metal device coating - Page 2

post #41 of 54
I don't see what's wrong with Stainless Steel, as-is. The beauty of use has its own aesthetic, and is not something that has to be, or even should be, avoided. The back of my old 1st-gen ipod touch is a network of scratches. It's broken-in, comfortable, and quite beautiful.

"Looking like new" isn't the highest aesthetic. What's the first thing you did with a new pair of sneakers as a kid?
post #42 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

So you imagine an industrial scale assembly line giving each unit a private bath, one at a time? more likely it would either be 100 (or more) dipped into a large bath all at the same time - or a continuous ride through a bath for 90 seconds - with one unit entering every second on the front end and another emerging every second at the back end for 1 unit every 1 second through the bath = 60 a minute = 3600 an hour = 86,400 a day = 604,800 a week = over 30 million a year.

Come back when u can read either the article or my comment
you only have freedom in choice when you know you have no choice
Reply
you only have freedom in choice when you know you have no choice
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post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by xsu View Post

You don't have to dip just one casing in the bath at the same time, my friend.

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

It's not a big deal. Industry does this in volume. One bath might hold a hundred or more at once. They might have one, ten, or fifty baths in a plant.

Um, yeah. I already wrote that

Baths capable of taking multiple units...

Regardless if it is personal baths or a large bath or a traveling bath it is a big ass amount of bath, nitrate and lots of heat. Yes that is industry, that is my point, the logistics of it.

Do a quick calc on how many tonnes of sand/glass is being delivered for assembly of iPhones per day. The points of failure are huge, the logistics planning awesome.
you only have freedom in choice when you know you have no choice
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you only have freedom in choice when you know you have no choice
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post #44 of 54
Being magnetic or not has no impact on WiFi and cell signals. Being magnetic blocks static magnetic fields. Conducting electricity blocks modulated fields. The only feature that would notice a difference in the metal type would be an electronic compass.
post #45 of 54
I agree, it's incredible to consider the logistics of creating all this glass, stainless steel, and aluminum. Then consider the fit and finish of Apple's products. Sometimes I just look at all the seams and curves and derive satisfaction at the touch and feel of the buttons and surfaces.

It's truly amazing. What an incredible asset Apple is to the U.S.

I think IBM wins in the patent award area, but Apple drives this industry forward and breakneck pace. Awesome. No wonder Cook (and others) gets such big bucks.
post #46 of 54
.

To my post of ...

" ... something that's impossible to penetrate ... My ex's thick skull "


You said ... " her wasteful arse "

Also ... " made my day ... i'm still laughing "


Good - glad turned into


BUT ... after thinking about it for a minute





We maybe talking about the same Woman ?


AND - are we're alone ?





Quote:
Originally Posted by enjourni View Post


Sorry to say ... dumb


Yea, that fits


This too

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


... brittle by default. If you ... harden ... becomes more brittle.


Hell yea, that was par for the course


But ...

Was that day when came home early

To the - SURPRISE ...


Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


... does this in volume. One bath might hold a hundred or more at once.

AND

Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post


... fingerprints ... hundreds of greasy fingerprints


Yea - was tempted ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


... a good smack


But, naw

Not made no difference anyway ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


... so dense ... could throw into a black hole


Yep

Sure sounds like a LOT of you know her too


Well, as Ol' Pappy always said ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post


... next time you buy ... ask if it is high quality ... can now test on the spot


Good Advice - Very Good Advice





.

P.S.

To any Freudian Analyzers of Comparative Verbology

Go Nutz - but don't forget

To do a complete job, need the entire thread on your 'couch'



.

P.S.S.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cy_starkman View Post


Baths capable of taking multiple units ... the logistics planning awesome.


Hey cy - you too were there that afternoon ?

.
post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

I really wonder how defensible this patent is. This seems like a rather normal materials engineering process. I'd bet that there's a lot of aerospace and/or automotive companies that might use similar treatments for certain parts.

It's of course a great way to improve durability. But a patent for the process seems rather sketchy to me.


No discolorization would be quite an accomplishment. If will likely reduce the corrosion resistance.
post #48 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ulfoaf View Post

No discolorization would be quite an accomplishment. If will likely reduce the corrosion resistance.

The purpose of the process is to provide surface hardness. Corrosion resistance is just a bonus. In something such as we are speculating about, the time in the process would be comparatively short to avoid hardening it so deeply that the material becomes brittle. Besides, the "frame" will not be subjected to the same sort of use as industrial products.

A big rig diesel crankshaft or those on a Mercedes auto diesel are hardened perhaps 0.015" (fifteen thousandths). Much more and there is a risk that the crank would be subject to shattering due to the shockwave of the diesel ignition cycle. I suspect that an iPhone frame/antenna would need much less than that.
post #49 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

I really wonder how defensible this patent is. This seems like a rather normal materials engineering process. I'd bet that there's a lot of aerospace and/or automotive companies that might use similar treatments for certain parts.

It's of course a great way to improve durability. But a patent for the process seems rather sketchy to me.

Process patents are an old and respected area of industry. If this methodology is different from the way it's being done now, then it deserves a patent. But Nitriding has been around for awhile. I even have a small machine that allows me to nitride small parts.
post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by agolongo View Post

Im a Mechanical Eng. Nitriding is not exotic (even some stainless derivitive, with some tweaked alloying elements), this should not have been granted a patent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RBR View Post

You are exactly correct that this patent was, in the parlance, "improvidently awarded".

Everything imaginable has been nitrided from aircraft propellers to diesel crankshafts and a lot of things in between. This is nothing new and nothing but hype anyway.

Neither of you guys knows enough about this patent to be able to say that. Patents have nothing to do with whether something is being done or nor. You should know that. It has to do with whether a different way has been found do do it. Or, whether some combination of previous work, and possibly something new has been been combined in a way that provides a unique way of doing it, or a unique result.

So, unless you both have completely read the patent(s), and are thoroughly familiar with the methodologies used, you can't comment knowledgeably about the patent's validity.
post #51 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by cy_starkman View Post

Um, yeah. I already wrote that

Baths capable of taking multiple units...

Regardless if it is personal baths or a large bath or a traveling bath it is a big ass amount of bath, nitrate and lots of heat. Yes that is industry, that is my point, the logistics of it.

Do a quick calc on how many tonnes of sand/glass is being delivered for assembly of iPhones per day. The points of failure are huge, the logistics planning awesome.

Your post seemed to show amazement it could be done. I simply pointed out that it's quite common, and no big deal at all.

What is even more amazing is that Apple could get tens of millions of cases machined out of metal cheaply enough, as each one must be done singly, as well as being polished singly before going to the anodizing baths.
post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by BC Kelly View Post

.

To my post of ...

" ... something that's impossible to penetrate ... My ex's thick skull "


You said ... " her wasteful arse "

Also ... " made my day ... i'm still laughing "


Good - glad turned into


BUT ... after thinking about it for a minute





We maybe talking about the same Woman ?


AND - are we're alone ?








Yea, that fits


This too




Hell yea, that was par for the course


But ...

Was that day when came home early

To the - SURPRISE ...




AND




Yea - was tempted ...




But, naw

Not made no difference anyway ...




Yep

Sure sounds like a LOT of you know her too


Well, as Ol' Pappy always said ...




Good Advice - Very Good Advice





.

P.S.

To any Freudian Analyzers of Comparative Verbology

Go Nutz - but don't forget

To do a complete job, need the entire thread on your 'couch'



.

P.S.S.




Hey cy - you too were there that afternoon ?

.

Heh! Not quite sure I understand that post, but interesting.
post #53 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Heh! Not quite sure I understand that post, but interesting.

.

Appears when you quoted my quote - least from what I'm looking at

The quotes I quoted did not show up in your quote

Was that something you did ?

Or could those quotes only showing up in what I'm seeing ?

And your confusion is because you don't see everything I thought was there ?

Dig ?

.
post #54 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Neither of you guys knows enough about this patent to be able to say that. Patents have nothing to do with whether something is being done or nor. You should know that. It has to do with whether a different way has been found do do it. Or, whether some combination of previous work, and possibly something new has been been combined in a way that provides a unique way of doing it, or a unique result.

So, unless you both have completely read the patent(s), and are thoroughly familiar with the methodologies used, you can't comment knowledgeably about the patent's validity.

Actually, you are the one who just proved his ignorance of the subject matter.

"Prior Art" is proof that an application should not be granted, or, if granted, should not have been and is a basis for withdrawal of the grant of the patent.

Even the USPTO has conceded that it has not done its job well in recent years and has, on its own initiative, withdrawn a number of patents "improvidently awarded".

A patent is nothing but a piece of paper giving one the right to sue and one runs the risk of having it invalidated in trying to enforce it as has happened a number of times in recent years.

Have a nice day.
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