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Android tops RIM in US smartphone market share, Apple's iPhone third

post #1 of 98
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Google's Android surpassed Research in Motion's BlackBerry to become the largest mobile platform at the start of 2011, while Apple's iOS and iPhone took third before the Verizon iPhone 4 was released.

New market data released by comScore on Monday shows that Google Android was the largest mobile platform in the U.S. for the three-month period that concluded with January 2011. Android's growth of 7.7 percent over the previous quarter pushed the Google mobile operating system to 31.2 percent share, past RIM's 30.4 percent share.

RIM slid 5.4 percent while Apple saw its share of the U.S. market go up 0.1 percent, bringing it to 24.7 percent total domestic share. The market share statistics represent active mobile device subscribers, but the numbers apply to the period before Apple launched a CDMA variant of the iPhone 4 on Verizon in early February.

Apple and Google were the only mobile platforms to see quarter-over-quarter gains, as Microsoft's platform share of the U.S. market dipped 1.7 percent to 8 percent. Palm saw its presence slide 0.7 percent to 3.2 percent total.

In terms of hardware, the survey of 30,000 mobile subscribers found that Samsung was the top overall handset maker with a 24.9 percent share, representing 0.7 percent growth from the October 2010 quarter. Apple came in fifth among device makers, with its 7 percent share up 0.6 percent from the previous three-month frame.



In the January period, 234 million Americans ages 13 and older used mobile devices, and 65.8 million people in the U.S. owned smartphones. Smartphone use was up 8 percent from the preceding three-month period, comScore found.

Most mobile subscribers -- 68.1 percent -- said they used text messaging on their mobile device. Just 37 percent of mobile subscribers used a browser, 35.3 percent downloaded applications to their device, and 23.7 percent played games.

ComScore first reported in January that Google Android had surpassed the iPhone in total active U.S. subscribers for the first time. At the time, Google was still behind the market leader, RIM.
post #2 of 98
Sure, but it's a bit like saying Linux beat the iMac in terms of market share. Are we comparing hardware or platforms? Not disputing Android's success but it seems an odd comparison.
post #3 of 98
How could Apple be so stupid to not to give away their mobile OS for free to any and all beleaguered smartphone manufacturers that are looking to scrape their way back into the black? Why would they want to give up OS marketshare at the expense of making actual profits on their products? The fools… the business savvy fools!
post #4 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Google's Android surpassed Research in Motion's BlackBerry to become the largest mobile platform at the start of 2011....

Wrong!

If it's just smartphone sales (and that's what the chart says), then it cannot by definition be a measurement of the size of the "platform." Even if it was, it's meaningless without including churn and obsolescence, which aren't included.

This is just another recent, dodgy, channel-oriented, inside-industry sales report masquerading as "platform numbers."
post #5 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Sure, but it's a bit like saying Linux beat the iMac in terms of market share. Are we comparing hardware or platforms? Not disputing Android's success but it seems an odd comparison.

Similar to the PC market, OS X does not sell as many units as Windows, but they're up at the top when you compare hardware to hardware - Dell vs Apple vs Toshiba.

Another way to look at it would be by revenue. How much are consumers willing to spend on handsets? "Android" might sell two $99 handsets for every one $200 handset that Apple sells. That might even the numbers out. At the end of the day, revenue/profit is what powers everything. That would be another metric.
post #6 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Wrong!

If it's just smartphone sales (and that's what the chart says), then it cannot by definition be a measurement of the size of the "platform." Even if it was, it's meaningless without including churn and obsolescence, which aren't included.

This is just another recent, dodgy, channel-oriented, inside-industry sales report masquerading as "platform numbers."

Im surprised AI didnt pick up on that. Where does iOS and others fit in that list when you account for its other mobile offerings?
post #7 of 98
The hemmdroids are foolish apple want a bees :-))
post #8 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Sure, but it's a bit like saying Linux beat the iMac in terms of market share. Are we comparing hardware or platforms? Not disputing Android's success but it seems an odd comparison.

useless comparison as ios is only on Apple while android is on many brands.

"Apple people have no objectivity when it comes to criticism of Apple.." Lenovo X1 Carbon is out..bye bye MBAir

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"Apple people have no objectivity when it comes to criticism of Apple.." Lenovo X1 Carbon is out..bye bye MBAir

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post #9 of 98
shouldn't mobile platforms include both the iPod touch and iPad as iOS devices?

it's Android vs iOS, and iOS should still be well ahead.
post #10 of 98
Ok, and this data means just what to me?

I use iOS because Android sucks; looks and feels like it was programmed by a bunch of dudes in a basement playing D&D between compiles.

And that should mean nothing to anyone else. I like iOS; I think Android sucks. The data mean the same thing - it's personal.
post #11 of 98
This article is without meaning or perspective and is just troll fodder for fanboys of different sorts.
post #12 of 98
Give me numbers comparing iPhone to any other PHONE (or even all phones manufactured by a single company) and I'll be interested.
Otherwise give me numbers comparing all Android devices to All iOS devices.

Apple isn't competing against Google... its competing against Motorola, HTC, etc.
And the Android manufactures are competing against each other (as in real dog-fight competition) as much or more than they're competing against Apple.

This is purely a religious, not technological or economic story.
post #13 of 98
This report is pretty good for Apple, a Y-O-Y maintenance ( slight growth) of their position despite the growth of Android, 27% on one carrier ( itself serving about 27% of the entire US phone market), and Android's rate of growth has slowed.

So I expect Apple to at least get to 35%-40% on all carriers, if not on Verizon alone. Maybe more. RIM may go to 20% but I think there is a market for keyboard driven stuff so it will stay there. Android may stay ahead, or be slightly behind the iPhone.

Apple have to reduce prices, though, for sure.

Quote:
Give me numbers comparing iPhone to any other PHONE (or even all phones manufactured by a single company) and I'll be interested.
Otherwise give me numbers comparing all Android devices to All iOS devices.

The first is illusionary, the second is a bit more valid but nobody is going to include the iPod touch in a phone category - however valid that may seem.
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post #14 of 98
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post #15 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2 cents View Post

This article is without meaning or perspective and is just troll fodder for fanboys of different sorts.

This is like posting an article on a Christian site denying the existence of God. They just want to start a flame war.
post #16 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Android may have the lead for now, but just wait till iPhone 4 comes out....

iPhone 4? I can't wait till last year...
post #17 of 98
A herd of sheep can also out number a Lion - that herd can have black sheep, white sheep, gray sheep, small and big - doesn't mean I would want to be a sheep though!
I don't think anyone is surprised by Android eventually outgrowing RIM and Apple in smartphone's specifically. What's news is how well Apple continues to do as only one manufacturer with one phone, as opposed to Google which has a version of Android running on every Tom, Dick, and Harry device out there.

And since the Android, RIM, and iOS platforms are also built for tablets, I'd like to know the complete performance in market shares including tablets?
post #18 of 98
The stats are accurate enough.
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post #19 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by c4rlob View Post

A herd of sheep can also out number a Lion - that herd can have black sheep, white sheep, gray sheep, small and big - doesn't mean I would want to be a sheep though!
I don't think anyone is surprised by Android eventually outgrowing RIM and Apple in smartphone's specifically. What's news is how well Apple continues to do as only one manufacturer with one phone, as opposed to Google which has a version of Android running on every Tom, Dick, and Harry device out there.

And since the Android, RIM, and iOS platforms are also built for tablets, I'd like to know the complete performance in market shares including tablets?

Most people would see tablets and phones as distinct categories. I estimate that iOS is selling more than Android, from last Dec. Just about.
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post #20 of 98
Keep making cheap phones that don't create profits and soon those companies will be out of business.
post #21 of 98
I'm not concerned about this at all, Android can have all the market shares but iOS is still the best in terms of user experience and that's what matters to me as a user.

I wouldn't mind Apple creating more variety of phones though. Differnt materials, different size, different color, etc, just like iPod.
post #22 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post

Ok, and this data means just what to me?

I use iOS because Android sucks; looks and feels like it was programmed by a bunch of dudes in a basement playing D&D between compiles.

And that should mean nothing to anyone else. I like iOS; I think Android sucks. The data mean the same thing - it's personal.

The data is a summary of the preferences of many peope, not just you, therefore it is infinitely more meaningful.

Why does almost everyone here view these numbers as a competition? It's not like many of you actually DO something to advance one system or the other. If Android wins market share, it is not the doing of Android fanbois, but of engineers and programmers. Or, to put it differently, your sports team winning doesn't make you less of a couch potato.

The data should more appropriately be analyzed from the point of view of developers: which OS to target, the one with more users, or the one with more users willing to pay for apps?
post #23 of 98
Android by all accounts is growing like a weed. And although weeds are far more plentiful than cultivated flowers, their value is also far less. Android by its very nature is wild and unrestricted, just like a weed. It only goes to show that if you leave a garden unattended, the end result is usually weeds. I'll take the walled garden, thank you Apple.

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post #24 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by alandail View Post

shouldn't mobile platforms include both the iPod touch and iPad as iOS devices?

it's Android vs iOS, and iOS should still be well ahead.

Well, then you could then throw Android tablets in the mix also though the numbers are tiny at the moment.
post #25 of 98
The iPhone and Apple is still the winner of the phone world. No other phone is as successful, and nobody else has transformed and innovated the entire phone industry like Apple has. The iPhone is the revolution that made all of those other copycat phones possible in the first place. If the iPhone hadn't come along, the other phones would still be looking like they did back in 2007.

The only way somebody can compete with Apple is to compare the iPhone to the phones from every single other android phone manufacturer put together. Good job.

What is that, like 1 VS 50 ? 1 VS 100? And many of those Android phones are dirt cheap, they're practically giving them away. And in some cases, they actually are giving them away. Color me unimpressed.

post #26 of 98
I for one welcome our new Android overlords... Who will now enslave humanity to toil in their Korean smartphone factories, or "Android Birthing Centers."

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #27 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

The data is a summary of the preferences of many peope, not just you, therefore it is infinitely more meaningful.

Why does almost everyone here view these numbers as a competition? It's not like many of you actually DO something to advance one system or the other. If Android wins market share, it is not the doing of Android fanbois, but of engineers and programmers. Or, to put it differently, your sports team winning doesn't make you less of a couch potato.

The data should more appropriately be analyzed from the point of view of developers: which OS to target, the one with more users, or the one with more users willing to pay for apps?

The only problem is that with the iPhone, a developer can still target more phones with one version of your app, which is why most developers till today put the iPhone first.
post #28 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Everyone wouldn't be so defensive here if Android was just a weed.

I think a lot of people here just wish for Apple to finally be the largest maker of something and iOS is the only chance they get. Personally I don't care. Apple continues to have only a small fraction of the PC market, however, Mac computers are the very best in my mind. It wouldn't disappoint me at all if Android became the new Microsoft in terms of mobile market dominance. Apple isn't going to stop making iPhones/iPads just because there are multitudes of low quality copycat devices available. They will hopefully keep raising the bar in quality and sophistication and I will continue to purchase Apple products, regardless of what the masses do.

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post #29 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andykemp View Post

iPhone 4? I can't wait till last year...

LOL!

But back to the point - I can't wait for a refresh of this chart in another month or so when the results of Big Red's launch are added in. ⌘+R
post #30 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by alandail View Post

shouldn't mobile platforms include both the iPod touch and iPad as iOS devices?

Only if we want new arguments about how the iPad is/isn't a big iPod touch...

The mobile categories compete separately, and should be counted separately.
post #31 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by msantti View Post

Well, then you could then throw Android tablets in the mix also though the numbers are tiny at the moment.

that's fine, include everything iOS with everything Android. When you do that, Apple is still ahead.
post #32 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andykemp View Post

This is like posting an article on a Christian site denying the existence of God. They just want to start a flame war.

Except the report is also the top headline on the CNN Money home page, too. And most people can't (or won't) read and comprehend past the headline.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

...The data should more appropriately be analyzed from the point of view of developers...

Which is actually why the data is misleading and poorly represented. If you read the orignal report, they use terms like "smartphone", "mobile device", and "mobile subscriber" interchangably. But those terms are most certainly not equal. A mobile device could include an iPod touch or iPad. A mobile subscriber could be an iPad.

The researchers were clearly not trying to compare hardware sales, they said they were comparing OS (ie, platform) marketshare. But it appears their numbers only refer to smartphones, which in today's world is a hardware distinction...does my mobile device have a phone?

If their target audience for their research is developers to understand which platform to target, their numbers should include all hardare that rus the OS. Not just smartphones.
post #33 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post

LOL!

But back to the point - I can't wait for a refresh of this chart in another month or so when the results of Big Red's launch are added in. ⌘+R

http://labs.chitika.com/iZone/

Steadily climbing all month. Pretty amazing that it's at nearly 10% after such a short time.
post #34 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Android isn't doing well becuase of cheap phones, it's actually the reverse. All the recent HTC, MOTO and Samsung phones are good solid hardware with very good specs. That is why Android is now doing well. Android has been around for a while, if it was about cheap phones it would have been doing well years ago. ...

No offence dude but this is nonsense. Android phones were more expensive in the past than they are now so if it "was about cheap phones" they would be doing better now than they were in the past, which is exactly what's happening actually. Android phones started out roughly the same price as the iPhone and have been dropping in average price ever since. The two for one giveaways, and the free phone with a certain contract stuff as well as a general lowering of the manufactured price are all new things.

What these figures show is just the sales channels being stuffed anyway. They don't actually equate to "Android doing well."
post #35 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by kriskkalu View Post

The only problem is that with the iPhone, a developer can still target more phones with one version of your app, which is why most developers till today put the iPhone first.

I don't see a problem, only possibilities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

...
If their target audience for their research is developers to understand which platform to target, their numbers should include all hardare that rus the OS. Not just smartphones.

In other words, this report is mere flamebait?
post #36 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

The reason Android is doing well like Apple is there is now good hardware to support a good OS.

There is some good hardware out there, but in those cases the OS is still just a knockoff of iOS. When articles like this come out they are comparing hard numbers, not the best of Android compared to the best of Apple as you or I might do in an evaluation for a purchasing decision. With raw numbers you factor in all of the really cheap crap that runs some flavor of Android. Eventually there will be billions of poor quality Android devices in China alone. Why? Because they will be cheap, not because they are better or even marginally acceptable. There will probably even be counterfeit iPhones running Android I would imagine.

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post #37 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

... The first (comparing iPhone to other phones) is illusionary, the second (comparing platform to platform) is a bit more valid but nobody is going to include the iPod touch in a phone category - however valid that may seem.

This is just crazy talk.

The *only* valid comparisons are the two mentioned. That's why these sales figures of "smartphones" (an essentially made-up category who's definition changes from analyst to analyst), are completely irrelevant even if you ignore the obvious issues over sales reporting, channel stuffing etc.

The iPhone is a phone that runs an OS.

Comparing it's sales to all the other phones that run Android ignores the fact that you are comparing one phone's sales figures to the sales figures of dozens and dozens of phones which is unfair by definition. It's like comparing the sales of the Ford F150 to the sales of all Honda's.

If you want to compare Android to iOS on the other hand, you have to include all the devices that run iOS (platform to platform), otherwise it's similarly unfair by definition. It's not like there aren't Android tablets now and Android music players as well.

To compare "how Android is doing" versus iOS you have to include all devices. To compare "how the iPhone is doing" versus an Android phone, you have to compare phone to phone. iOS wins in each category of course.

Judging by the rate of growth, iOS devices will swamp Android devices sooner rather than later, but everyone is so focussed on these bogus sales figures they won't notice it for a while.

RIM is likely to collapse almost completely after they finally get the Playbook out the door for instance. All the signs are there. What happens to the market when those users all have to pick between Android and iOS? Certainly the majority of them will pick iOS if recent consumer surveys are accurate. Same with Nokia when it finally goes down. iOS will pick up the lion's share of users with each collapse IMO.
post #38 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

In other words, this report is mere flamebait?

Nah, the report was an incomplete analysis with poorly defined scope. I'm sure they intended on performing a legitmate analysis. But they missed the mark.

The AI article about the report, on the other hand, was flamebait.
post #39 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

This is just crazy talk.

The *only* valid comparisons are the two mentioned. That's why these sales figures of "smartphones" (an essentially made-up category who's definition changes from analyst to analyst), are completely irrelevant even if you ignore the obvious issues over sales reporting, channel stuffing etc.

The iPhone is a phone that runs an OS.

Comparing it's sales to all the other phones that run Android ignores the fact that you are comparing one phone's sales figures to the sales figures of dozens and dozens of phones which is unfair by definition. It's like comparing the sales of the Ford F150 to the sales of all Honda's.

If you want to compare Android to iOS on the other hand, you have to include all the devices that run iOS (platform to platform), otherwise it's similarly unfair by definition. It's not like there aren't Android tablets now and Android music players as well.

To compare "how Android is doing" versus iOS you have to include all devices. To compare "how the iPhone is doing" versus an Android phone, you have to compare phone to phone. iOS wins in each category of course.

Judging by the rate of growth, iOS devices will swamp Android devices sooner rather than later, but everyone is so focussed on these bogus sales figures they won't notice it for a while.

RIM is likely to collapse almost completely after they finally get the Playbook out the door for instance. All the signs are there. What happens to the market when those users all have to pick between Android and iOS? Certainly the majority of them will pick iOS if recent consumer surveys are accurate. Same with Nokia when it finally goes down. iOS will pick up the lion's share of users with each collapse IMO.

Refering to the part I highlighted above, I think you could compare all iOS phones to all Android phones, which is what the report does. However:

1) You have to be clear that is what you are comparing. The original report is a little vague, but seems to indicate that is what they are comparing. All iOS phones to all Android points. The AI article obscures that even further making it uncertain if the numbers include all iOS devices. And the CNN reporting of this report (http://money.cnn.com/2011/03/07/tech...roid/index.htm) is even worse when it implies the numbers include all iOS devices when they say, "In November, Android overtook Apple's iOS, which runs on the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad." But the analysis in the report only includes iPhone iOS devices.

2) If you are going to compare all iOS phones to all Andoird phones, then I would ask...WHY? What point are you trying to make? Who is the audience for the analysis? Is it meaningful to anyone other than as an academic statistical exercise? You can't put it in context of hardware sales, because you are lumping together Android hardware from multiple vendors. It's not about OS marketshare because you are ignorning a sizeable number of non-phone mobile devices. It can't be about user experience or preference because each Andfoid device is different.

It's a fine statistical analysis (other than poorly defined scope). But what's the point of it?
post #40 of 98
why all of the guessing, the actual US mobile market browser share numbers are here

http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_os...-201002-201102

Apple has a sizable advantage. And worldwide the gap is even larger

http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_os...-201002-201102
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