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Adobe releases Flash-to-HTML5 conversion tool to support Apple's iOS

post #1 of 87
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Adobe's newly released "Wallaby" application aims to expand support for Apple's line of iOS devices, including the iPhone and iPad, by converting Flash files into HTML5.

The new application available from Adobe Labs carries a codename and is dubbed "experimental technology." It converts artwork and animation contained in Adobe Flash Professional files with the ".fla" extension into an HTML format that can be opened on the mobile Safari Web browser on iOS devices.

"This allows you to reuse and extend the reach of your content to devices that do not support the Flash runtimes," Adobe wrote.

Once Flash files are converted to HTML, they can be edited with an HTML editing tool, or by hand. Content can then be viewed on a supported browser like Apple's Safari.

Adobe noted that not all Flash Pro features are supported in the HTML5 format, like 3D transforms, ActionScript, streaming sound, and embedded or external video. Supported features include images, layers, scenes, font embedding and FrameSets.

Wallaby is best used with Apple's iOS 4.2, as previous versions of the mobile operating system have known masking issues with HTML files converted from Flash. Remaining issues, Adobe says, are a result of a bug in the mobile Safari browser, and include artifacts when zooming and borders around masked artwork.



The lack of support for Adobe Flash on the iOS platform has been a major point of contention between Adobe and Apple. The debate came to a head last year, when Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs penned an open letter in which he slammed Flash as technology unfit for the modern era of low-power touchscreen computing devices like the iPhone and iPad.

Apple even went as far as to stop shipping Macs with Flash preinstalled, claiming the change ensures that users will install the latest version of the software for enhanced security and performance. But tests also found that the removal of Flash from the new MacBook Air boosted battery life by two hours.

As an alternative to Flash, Apple has pushed the HTML5 standard for its mobile devices, as it does not require any special plugins for a browser. Flash was also touted as a major feature of the new Motorola Xoom tablet, though the hardware shipped last month lacking support for Adobe's plugin.
post #2 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Adobe noted that not all Flash Pro features are supported in the HTML5 format, like 3D transforms, ActionScript, streaming sound, and embedded or external video. Supported features include images, layers, scenes, font embedding and FrameSets.

In other words, "enough for annoying full-page Flash rollover ads."

Can't wait to see those on my iPhone, I'm sure that will enhance the mobile browsing experience.

post #3 of 87
Seeing as how Action Script doesn't carry over... it makes this pretty much pointless, as every time I've designed a flash piece on a site I've USED ACTION SCRIPT to make damn near anything happen. Back to the drawing board Adobe.
post #4 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urinal Mint View Post

In other words, "enough for annoying full-page Flash rollover ads."

Can't wait to see those on my iPhone, I'm sure that will enhance the mobile browsing experience.


That's the danger of getting what you wish for. So many people on here have been clamoring for the death of Flash. But the advertisers aren't going to give up so instead of using a plug-in that can be disabled, you'll be stuck with HTML5 ads that can't be disabled.

Isn't progress wonderful?
post #5 of 87
nice interface.

and feature list.... it converts anything that was done with macromedia future splash. YAY!
post #6 of 87
inch by inch by bit by bit

adobe kicking and screaming moves to html 5

crumble tumble, 10 years and waiting as they bumble
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post #7 of 87
It's very funny to see that Apple, who used to refuse ported apps when a conversion tool was used, wants that people who spend time coding in Flash use their program, so that a lot of iOS users can enjoy all that content they couldn't see because of Apple's decision. If I were a Flash developer, I would never use that.
post #8 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by rigogibson850 View Post

Seeing as how Action Script doesn't carry over... it makes this pretty much pointless, as every time I've designed a flash piece on a site I've USED ACTION SCRIPT to make damn near anything happen. Back to the drawing board Adobe.

yes, w/o AS support, that is a joke! I think, that is maybe a trick of Adobe, cause there is so few support for real cover, so they could say, you see, there is so few developer like cover their FLASH to HTML5, so iOS does not support FLASH is a incorrect choose....,
post #9 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post

It's very funny to see that Apple, who used to refuse ported apps when a conversion tool was used, wants that people who spend time coding in Flash use their program, so that a lot of iOS users can enjoy all that content they couldn't see because of Apple's decision. If I were a Flash developer, I would never use that.

How is that a bad thing?
post #10 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by xsu View Post

How is that a bad thing?

I misread the title of the post and read "apple releases" instead...
post #11 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

, or by hand. Content can then be viewed on a supported browser like Apple's Safari.

Adobe noted that not all Flash Pro features are supported in the HTML5 format, like 3D transforms, ActionScript, streaming sound, and embedded or external video. Supported features include images, layers, scenes, font embedding and FrameSets.


So with other words, nothing that makes Flash interresting will be supported. Why does Adobe bother to bring this tool out at all. I don't understand them anymore.
post #12 of 87
I would imagine any client these days who hires a developer to build a site wants their site viewable on iPhones, iPads, etc. This sort of Flash-to-HTML5 converter tool is just a stop gap for lazy developers who don't want to learn HTML5 (and a way for Adobe to cash in on the declining dependence of Flash). One needs only to look at Apple's own website for an example of a rich, interactive e-commerce site that is completely Flash-free (there are many others). Apple's exclusion of Flash is derided by such nerdy/developer types who hate change. Too bad for them, Apple is looking out for the consumer, at the expense of some developer relations.
post #13 of 87
Cool. So now your can convert your existing flash stuff and switch to HTML5 full-time. Thanks adobe!
post #14 of 87
I can't believe they haven't done this yet. They're touting html5 but without tools, how do they expect it to take off?
post #15 of 87
Great! You can convert your timeline animations, but you can't convert those annoying, counter-intuitive, search-engine unfriendly, show off-ish Flash-Based Navigation sites!

Adobe Is Wise!
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post #16 of 87
I hate Flash and Flash based sites.

For the most part they are annoying and lame. Confusing to navigate, stupid sounds and can't make text larger. Completely useless.

Flash can't die soon enough for me.
post #17 of 87

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 5/4/12 at 1:09pm
post #18 of 87
deleted
post #19 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Adobe noted that not all Flash Pro features are supported in the HTML5 format, like 3D transforms, ActionScript, streaming sound, and embedded or external video. Supported features include images, layers, scenes, font embedding and FrameSets.

Hmm... If only there were a vendor neutral HTML5 tag that supported <video> and <audio> natively...

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post #20 of 87
Is it not possible for Adobe to make an app that allows for creation of animation (timeline) directly in HTML 5? Not a nerd here but doesn't Dreamweaver create html code for websites already, why does HTML 5 appear to so intimidating to some developers and Adobe? Can anyone help here?
post #21 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

That's the danger of getting what you wish for. So many people on here have been clamoring for the death of Flash. But the advertisers aren't going to give up so instead of using a plug-in that can be disabled, you'll be stuck with HTML5 ads that can't be disabled.

Isn't progress wonderful?

You forgot the part in the progress where some hacker figures out how to create a html5 ad block.

As for the main article, I was rather hoping that Adobe would stick to their guns a while longer. I do hate Flash but was a little proud of them for having the balls to flip Jobs the finger. And I was really hoping they would make Flash work to shut up the naysayers. This just feels like Jobs was right along and they are too lazy to do it right so they are giving up.
post #22 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I can't believe they haven't done this yet. They're touting html5 but without tools, how do they expect it to take off?

Coda, TextMate and others all support HTML 5 editing just fine.
post #23 of 87
Jobs has it right regarding Flash but I think that if there was a thought that blu-ray would fail, guess again.

Blu-ray is superior to downloading HD content on several levels and appeals to people who like to collect things. Buy a movie on a professionally-prepped blu-ray disk and you have a secure medium with a long life span. Get the file digitally and you get a compressed version of the file and then have to deal with storing it in a stable manner. If you want an impressive-looking collection, good luck making much of an impression by hauling out your digital library.

Apple certainly is right to turn its back on Flash. Within the next couple of years, the Internet will have left Flash behind. But at some point, like it or not, Apple will have to incorporate blu-ray support into its products.

I think it's sad, really, that there was an attempt by Microsoft to kill blu-ray with Apple standing on the sidelines, pretty much letting it happen.

I thought it was puzzling at the time that we had the HD-DVD vs. blu-ray battle but it became obvious later on that Microsoft's intent in being a major backer of HD-DVD was to cripple the adoption of blu-ray as the next generation of optical storage. This has been shown by the fact that Microsoft appears to have no intention of making blu-ray a part of the xBox eco-system, arguing that digital downloads will render blu-ray irrelevant. Nonsense. Blu-rays will flourish and now that pricing has reached reasonable levels, they literally can't make them fast enough.

So while I have no problem with Apple choosing to shut down Flash, I do think that Jobs' position on blu-ray needs to shift. I now have a decent number of blu-ray titles and I'd love to watch them on a very good recent-vintage Cinema Display. It's not that I think having files stored on Optical discs is for everyone but on the other hand, if it is a part of how many of us have chosen to purchase our movies, surely there is something rather insidious about refusing to at least allow for someone to set up to enjoy that material on an Apple system. Even if the future, as envisioned by Jobs, is computers not including a built-in drive, software support would allow the rest of us to plug in an external drive if we so choose.

Forcing the Internet to drop Flash is one thing but refusing to support a format that consumers are going to embrace, whether Jobs likes it or not, is another matter entirely.

By the way, lately I've been buying blu-rays for a lot less money than it would cost me to purchase a quasi-HD version off of Apple via iTunes. What's wrong with this picture?
post #24 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

That's the danger of getting what you wish for. So many people on here have been clamoring for the death of Flash. But the advertisers aren't going to give up so instead of using a plug-in that can be disabled, you'll be stuck with HTML5 ads that can't be disabled.

Most people don't know what HTML5 actually is. Javascript and CSS they mistakenly call HTML5. There are some new tags in HTML5 but none of them are at all related to moving things around on the screen as in Flash-like animations.

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post #25 of 87
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Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

You forgot the part in the progress where some hacker figures out how to create a html5 ad block.

As for the main article, I was rather hoping that Adobe would stick to their guns a while longer. I do hate Flash but was a little proud of them for having the balls to flip Jobs the finger. And I was really hoping they would make Flash work to shut up the naysayers. This just feels like Jobs was right along and they are too lazy to do it right so they are giving up.

Maybe it just doesn't make business sense for them to do it.
post #26 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

You forgot the part in the progress where some hacker figures out how to create a html5 ad block.

As for the main article, I was rather hoping that Adobe would stick to their guns a while longer. I do hate Flash but was a little proud of them for having the balls to flip Jobs the finger. And I was really hoping they would make Flash work to shut up the naysayers. This just feels like Jobs was right along and they are too lazy to do it right so they are giving up.

Its great to stick to your guns when you are able to handle the guns without shooting yourself in the foot. Unfortunately, not only did they react badly (and rightly so - they didn't take Apple guidance seriously) to Steve losing patience with their lack of prioritizing Flash for "smart" mobile but then they cobble together Flash 10.1 and throw that at the Android platform as their solution in order to show Apple they aren't the boss of Adobe. Some ridiculous semi-adolescent behavior which demonstrates the simple fact they don't take the paradigm shift to mobile seriously.
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post #27 of 87
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Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post

Some ridiculous semi-adolescent behavior which demonstrates the simple fact they don't take the paradigm shift to mobile seriously.

Paradigm shift? You do realize that mobile accounts for almost 3% of web traffic?

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post #28 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by rigogibson850 View Post

Seeing as how Action Script doesn't carry over... it makes this pretty much pointless, as every time I've designed a flash piece on a site I've USED ACTION SCRIPT to make damn near anything happen. Back to the drawing board Adobe.

well actionscripting does not work with touch-based systems, and have been saying this for years. We used to use Director for touch-based kiosks. Flash was designed web-centric with an input device....

Yea i have asked all these fandroids how you use a flash WEBSITE on a touch-based systems. All they ever talk about are flvs, even a fandroid insulting for me for bringing up a .swf for being old technology, yet he didnt realize that anything with flash animation and scripting involves a .swf to view on the web or even locally....

This is how misinformed these people supporting android is. They want freedom to be trapped in a proprietary format that does not even work in the world of touch. Flash's older brother Director is more capable of handling touch-based systems and kiosks.

Yet all these punks think flash is only .flv, which means all they do is youtube and redtube and have no idea what was intended for, or how it is properly implemented.
post #29 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I can't believe they haven't done this yet. They're touting html5 but without tools, how do they expect it to take off?

The iAd Producer is almost exactly that: an authoring tool for interactive/animated html 5 content.

I still believe Apple might extend iAd Producer and make a full-blown HTML 5 authoring tool out of it some day.
post #30 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by crift2012 View Post

Flash's older brother Director is more capable of handling touch-based systems and kiosks.

Lingo is not even close to being as full featured as today's Actionscript. You can do anything you want with Actionscript with the exception of writing files to disk which Lingo can do, but that has nothing to do with programming a touch capable interface.

I'm am a bit surprised that Wallaby does absolutely zero Actionscript since the language is almost identical to Javascript.

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post #31 of 87
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Originally Posted by Urinal Mint View Post

In other words, "enough for annoying full-page Flash rollover ads."

Can't wait to see those on my iPhone, I'm sure that will enhance the mobile browsing experience.


I don't see why AdBlock won't be able to take care of HTML5 spam with some modifications.
post #32 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

The iAd Producer is almost exactly that: an authoring tool for interactive/animated html 5 content.

If you read the user agreement you are only allowed to make iAds with it and cannot use it for any other purpose.

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post #33 of 87
Finally. Maybe this means Adobe is recognizing that Flash sucks.
post #34 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Most people don't know what HTML5 actually is. Javascript and CSS they mistakenly call HTML5. There are some new tags in HTML5 but none of them are at all related to moving things around on the screen as in Flash-like animations.

Actually you are wrong. HTML5 is HTML, Javascript, CSS3, and several other technologies.
post #35 of 87
Couple other points of interest is that it makes use of SVG for a lot of functionality. SVG is somewhat problematic when it comes to Windows servers, since by default Windows does not include the mime type. No big deal if you have Administrator access to the IIS manager, but many people will not be able to configure their server to actually serve SVG files created by Wallaby.

One of the major differences between Flash and HTML is that Flash has much better text rendering with all kinds of nice typography features like ligature, glyphs, kerning pairs, type on a path etc etc. For obvious reasons none of that is supported either.

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post #36 of 87
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Originally Posted by AdonisSMU View Post

Actually you are wrong. HTML5 is HTML, Javascript, CSS3, and several other technologies.

It does integrate MathML, XML (XHTML), Unicode and describes implementations for hooking into CSS, however both JS and CSS are separate specifications and not included in the current HTML5 draft. HTML5 is Hypertext Markup only.

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post #37 of 87
How do you spell "whipped"?

A-D-O-B-E
post #38 of 87
HTML5 is Javascript?

What kind of misinformation is that?
post #39 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

I still believe Apple might extend iAd Producer and make a full-blown HTML 5 authoring tool out of it some day.

What I don't understand is why Adobe isn't creating their own "full-blown HTML 5 authoring tool", as this should be right in their wheelhouse...

OTOH, it wouldn't be the first time hubris got in the way of a prime business opportunity.

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post #40 of 87
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Originally Posted by John.B View Post

What I don't understand is why Adobe isn't creating their own "full-blown HTML 5 authoring tool", as this should be right in their wheelhouse...

Flash is a virtual monopoly for Adobe. Very few companies have the foresight or nerve to develop products that challenge their own monopoly. Furthermore, strictly speaking, HTML5 specification is not official final yet. It's one thing to release a free browser to support features that might or might not be official. It's another thing to sell an authoring product that may produce HTML5 code/features that may change.
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