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Japan and the Japanese People - Page 6

post #201 of 249
All people will care about in 2012 is whether they're paying more than they were when Obama took office.

Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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post #202 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzguru View Post

All people will care about in 2012 is whether they're paying more than they were when Obama took office.

And they probably won't be. Food prices will drop with oil - there is no reason for oil prices to be so high. Worldwide oil storage is very high, speculators have used up all the storage:

2,680 million barrels of oil in storage, near the all time high of 2,777 million barrels.

http://omrpublic.iea.org/
45 2a3 300b 211 845 833
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45 2a3 300b 211 845 833
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post #203 of 249
Oh, well.

My posting here comes to an end.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

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Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

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post #204 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

Oh, well.

My posting here comes to an end.


Stick with it, please.

Your updates are a unique perspective for people here.
We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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post #205 of 249
"The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant is facing yet another problem with its wastewater filtering system. The system came to a halt again on Sunday.

Tokyo Electric Power Company has been filtering highly contaminated water in basements to remove radioactive material and then pump the water back into the reactors as coolant.

Shortly after 7 AM on Sunday, some of the pumps in a US decontamination device stopped and could not be restarted. The equipment is used to remove radioactive cesium.

About an hour later, a pump in a French device also stopped working.

A back-up pump also failed to work, bringing the whole decontamination system to a halt.
TEPCO says it is continuing to inject cooling water into reactors by using treated water.

The decontamination system has faced earlier problems. On Thursday, another pump stopped at one time. On Friday, an alarm went off and the system stopped operating."
~ http://www3.nhk.or.jp/daily/english/07_11.html
We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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post #206 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

Oh, well.
My posting here comes to an end.

Don't let them put you off. Please continue. People really need an insider's perspective on what the heck is going on with Japan. And to see how "clean, renewable, safe and essential" nuclear energy is.
post #207 of 249
The US Empire and Its Japanese Province

Quote:
Writes Allen Mendenhall:
Quote:
"As of August 29, Japan has a new prime minister: Yoshihiko Noda. Noda, who will step down from his position as Japan’s Finance Minister, is the sixth Japanese PM in five years and the third consecutive leader of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) to assume the country’s highest office. He comes to power following a party runoff that took place just three days after the former Prime Minister, Naoto Kan, announced his resignation. Noda will face a number of issues during his tenure, but one of the most pressing is the “Futenma base dispute” that has not gone away.

"The Obama administration has demanded that the air station known as Futenma remain on the island of Okinawa, despite longstanding and heated local resistance to the air station and to the U.S. military generally. The Futenma air station is the product of the Futenma Accord, itself a product of American and Japanese negotiations in the wake of a 1995 incident in which three U.S. soldiers on Okinawa gang-raped a twelve-year-old girl. Since that incident, the Futenma air base has managed to upset local mayors and the Okinawan populace, whom Tokyo-based politicians treat as second-class citizens. U.S. administrations have been complicit—indeed facilitative—in Tokyo’s dismissive treatment of Okinawans. That’s why Doug Bandow, among other commentators, has referred to the Washington-Tokyo alliance as collusive and colonial.

"Two PMs ago—yes, at this point one might as well start using Japanese PMs as units of time—Yukio Hatoyama stood up to the United States and challenged Obama on the Futenma issue. He campaigned on the promise of base relocation. Not long into his tenure, however, the Obama minions—most notably Hilary Clinton, Robert Gates and company—went great lengths to silence Hatoyama and to turn public opinion against him. That seemed to work in Japan proper, but in Okinawa protests against the base began to mount, and local mayors began to gather petitions to mail directly to Obama. In the end, Obama’s heavy-handed foreign policy prevailed. Hatoyama stepped down. Okinawans were furious. After all, wasn’t this U.S. president the recipient of a Nobel Peace Prize?

"In light of Obama’s triumph over Hatoyama, Naoto Kan—one PM ago—avoided the Futenma issue, prevaricating whenever it came up. Despite repeated media insistences that the Futenma issue has been settled and that relocation will take place within (not outside) Okinawa, the future of the Futenma air station remains uncertain. Furthermore, U.S. facilities continue to occupy prime real estate on this tropical island, and U.S. troops continue to pollute the beaches, commit crimes, and carry out noisy and dangerous fighter jet training exercises.

"All of this has happened in part to circumvent Article 9 of the Japanese Constitution, which prohibits Japan from maintaining troops or using military force as a means of settling international disputes. In effect, Tokyo-based politicians have allowed the U.S. military to function as a de facto Japanese military—and U.S. military leaders and politicians seem to enjoy this role because it gives them wide latitude to influence Japanese public policy, both domestic and international.

"Now it’s time to see whether Noda will, as he ought to, stand up to Obama and defy the Tokyo-Washington elites of which Noda is currently a part. It’s time to see whether Noda will demand that Futenma be moved to Guam, a U.S. territory that has expressed interest in hosting the base. It’s time to see whether Noda will demand total withdrawal of U.S. troops from Okinawa and his entire country. I, for one, won’t get my hopes up. Noda will be the next impeccable suit in a long line of impeccably suited leaders who pander to U.S. interests at the expense of impoverished and angry Okinawans. Let’s hope I’m wrong. Futenma needs to go. And Okinawans need a chance to live free from occupation."

Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

Reply
post #208 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzguru View Post

The US Empire and Its Japanese Province

With China and North Korea just around the corner, in this day and age unfortunately the reality is that Japan will probably want to keep a US military presence... Simply as you mention as a proxy for the Japanese military. But also because of the US wanting a base right next door to China and North Korea.

That said, on Okinawa or other locations in Japan, can they at least reduce the base size, or relocate to some other part of Japan that is less polluting or "invasive"?
post #209 of 249
Today marks the 1st anniversary of the quake and tsunami.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #210 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

Today marks the 1st anniversary of the quake and tsunami.

This people that survived the quake and tsunami are heroes indeed and the rest who perished will always be thought as of heroes as well.
post #211 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

This people that survived the quake and tsunami are heroes indeed and the rest who perished will always be thought as of heroes as well.

Why are they heroes? Aren't the people that risked their lives saving others heroes? Aren't the workers at the nuclear plant heroes? When you label everyone who died in the tragedy a "hero," it cheapens the term.
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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post #212 of 249
I am reminded of why I stopped posting here.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

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post #213 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDW2001 View Post

Why are they heroes? Aren't the people that risked their lives saving others heroes? Aren't the workers at the nuclear plant heroes? When you label everyone who died in the tragedy a "hero," it cheapens the term.

I'm on board with that. Victims of a tragedy aren't automatically heroes.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
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“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
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post #214 of 249
Agreed too. Dying does not a hero make. Let's not forget though that their are many many, whether property developers or nuclear power trumpeters, who cared about their wallets, not the lives of people. They are criminals, and they should not be forgotten either.

It's sad to hear the talk of re-building in these areas. You would have thought they'd have learned their lesson. I guess cheap land holding the promise of the "Japanese Dream", is just too irresistible for many. The world seems to be losing it's senses more as every day passes. It doesn't exactly honour those who died either to carry on with the sham.

Meanwhile, sensibly, Japan has turned off most of it's reactors (54 of 56) for the time being, but that's causing problems for business, and so they're fleeing in droves.

They need to invest in green energy. That's the best way to honour the lives lost from this horrendous, but largely preventable disaster.
We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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post #215 of 249
Those were old nuclear plants. New plant designs are green. What you propose would be like banning all modern Ford automobiles because someone was still driving around a Pinto and the gas tank caught fire, but only after the most horrific accident that has happened in 40 years.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #216 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by BR View Post

Those were old nuclear plants. New plant designs are green. What you propose would be like banning all modern Ford automobiles because someone was still driving around a Pinto and the gas tank caught fire, but only after the most horrific accident that has happened in 40 years.

You know you can still die in a 2012 Buick, right?

How safe do you think these modern reactors are? Be honest. None of this failsafe stuff please.
We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
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post #217 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hands Sandon View Post

You know you can still die in a 2012 Buick, right?

How safe do you think these modern reactors are? Be honest. None of this failsafe stuff please.

Good point. We don't just stop driving cars because accidents can happen. Neither should we just stop using nuclear power, although I agree we should do much more to develop solar, wind, and especially geothermal power.

Meanwhile, we should get off oil and coal way before we get off nuclear.
post #218 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hands Sandon View Post

You know you can still die in a 2012 Buick, right?

How safe do you think these modern reactors are? Be honest. None of this failsafe stuff please.

There exist reactors that, through their very nature, via the laws of physics, will slow down their reactions if the reactions start ramping up too much. Modern reactors are incredibly safe.

Also, I don't think you understood the analogy. You don't stop driving modern cars because an old car, known to have design flaws, still is being driven, and suffers a gas tank explosion in an incredibly rare crash circumstance.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #219 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Meanwhile, we should get off oil and coal way before we get off nuclear.

Absolutely.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #220 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzguru View Post

All people will care about in 2012 is whether they're paying more than they were when Obama took office.

The economy is the most important issue today to decide if Obama gets in or not.Not religion.
post #221 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by BR View Post

There exist reactors that, through their very nature, via the laws of physics, will slow down their reactions if the reactions start ramping up too much. Modern reactors are incredibly safe.

I agree, and have read about these in business mags and Wired.

What I don't understand is why all the development of these things seem to be occurring outside North America.

Silicon Valley is still located in California, right? Why are we lagging on this tech?
The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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post #222 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Meanwhile, we should get off oil and coal way before we get off nuclear.

Again...why? Because you say so?!

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #223 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

Again...why? Because you say so?!

Coal is filthy and dangerous.

And I've answered about oil already. If you keep asking the same questions and ignoring responses, what the fuck is the point in conversing with you?

Again. Oil causes deadly pollution, is limited in supply, and is bad economy. Don't ignore the response this time.
post #224 of 249
There has to be a way to extract energy from coal in a safe, environmentally friendly way.

Nobody's found it yet, but at some point, it will happen. It simply must.
The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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post #225 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Coal is filthy and dangerous.

And I've answered about oil already. If you keep asking the same questions and ignoring responses, what the fuck is the point in conversing with you?

Again. Oil causes deadly pollution, is limited in supply, and is bad economy. Don't ignore the response this time.

I didn't ignore the response last time. I simply expected you to explain why this great resource which has many, many great benefits should not be used because it has some negatives which appear to be greatly outweighed by its benefits. Instead you prefer to simply declare it to be all bad with no benefit...or at least to have us simply accept your claim that the bad outweighs the good without you actually supporting this claim.

P.S. You are free to "get off oil and coal" any time you want. Knock yourself out. Let us know how that goes.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #226 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hands Sandon View Post

Agreed too. Dying does not a hero make. Let's not forget though that their are many many, whether property developers or nuclear power trumpeters, who cared about their wallets, not the lives of people. They are criminals, and they should not be forgotten either.

It's sad to hear the talk of re-building in these areas. You would have thought they'd have learned their lesson. I guess cheap land holding the promise of the "Japanese Dream", is just too irresistible for many. The world seems to be losing it's senses more as every day passes. It doesn't exactly honour those who died either to carry on with the sham.

Meanwhile, sensibly, Japan has turned off most of it's reactors (54 of 56) for the time being, but that's causing problems for business, and so they're fleeing in droves.

They need to invest in green energy. That's the best way to honour the lives lost from this horrendous, but largely preventable disaster.


About the rebuilding... Discussions are proceeding, albeit not quickly, and sadly, the central government, currently with power in a not so intellectually endowed group, isn't helping to expedite things.

Japan has a population roughly half that of the US. Japan has a land area roughly the size of California. Over 75% of the land is too mountainous to use.

I urge any of you who is interested to use Google Earth to fly over the impacted areas to get a feel for the terrain. Most of Japan is mountainous, leaving precious little space usually along the coast for people to live, thus creating a recipe for disaster. Find Tokyo, go east over to the coast, and move north to the tip of the main island (Honshu). With an eye height of 20 kilometers, you can see a lot fast. Or search for KESENNUMA and look around there (well north of the nuke plant and closer to where the larger waves were).

Many areas are considering moving to higher ground but that means flattening out some mountains. They are thinking to use the coastal areas for farming and industry. Of course, the ports for fishing. How to ensure safety in the low areas? Evacuation routes need to be secured and practiced. Some sturdy buildings may be used as evac shelters. Some researchers are looking hard into the survivability of buildings; last year, some buildings made it through the tsunami while others, once thought to be sturdy, were uprooted or crushed.

Then there is the problem of debris. There is quite a bit of it and some is contaminated, requiring all to be checked before any other areas will accept it. A slow process.

Yes, most of the reactors are off-line and if I'm not wrong, the other two will go off in the next couple of months. Talks are underway to get a couple up and running, but resistance is strong. Sadly, businesses are leaving. The companies will survive, but the people and regions may not. There has been some talk about getting large companies with large plots of land to install generators, but that seems to have faded. A kind of apathy seems to be developing and it is worrisome.

I go back to the government. The current ruling party is a disaster unto itself and that makes the whole recovery that much harder. In fact, it is so depressing to watch, I have no resistance remaining to watch the wild show that is the GOP primaries back in the States. I can't take both so I follow that which impacts me the most. Many here, though, are deeply worried about the GOP regaining power in the US after watching the rhetoric of the primary runs and the GOP's antics since Obama took office. Japan depends greatly upon the US so they want a stable US.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #227 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

I didn't ignore the response last time. I simply expected you to explain why this great resource which has many, many great benefits should not be used because it has some negatives which appear to be greatly outweighed by its benefits.

Don't pretend you're too dumb to realize that if there are alternatives that don't have as many negatives, then that is obviously preferable.

And just imagine the huge boost in freedom we will have if we no longer have to deal with OPEC and the middle east. And no amount of drilling in Alaska, Canada the pacific coast and the gulf will allow us to be independent from the ME.
post #228 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Don't pretend you're too dumb to realize that if there are alternatives that don't have as many negatives, then that is obviously preferable.

If the benefit to detriment ratios were the same then you'd have a case. Obviously they aren't.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

And just imagine the huge boost in freedom we will have...

Since when did you become interested in freedom?

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #229 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

If the benefit to detriment ratios were the same then you'd have a case. Obviously they aren't.

Yes, obviously, because that's what the oil lobby want you to believe. Outside of the US, it's happening. The US is holding itself behind. Obviously.
Quote:
Since when did you become interested in freedom?

I'm just as interested in it as you are, we just have a different definition of it. Guns, for instance. I have much more freedom here in hong kong than you have in the US with regard to threat of firearms related crime. Health care. I have more freedom in hong kong to see a doctor when I get sick and to have tests done when I suspect a problem, simply because I can afford it here. Transportation. I have way more freedom of transportation here, because of the excellent public transport systems. And I have the freedom to not own a car (you don't realize how much better that is until you've experienced it).

You don't know freedom. What you call freedom is anarchy.
post #230 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Yes, obviously, because that's what the oil lobby want you to believe. Outside of the US, it's happening. The US is holding itself behind. Obviously.

Obviously. Then everyone will soon surpass the US and these new approaches will soon be dominant.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

I'm just as interested in it as you are, we just have a different definition of it.

Of course.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

You don't know freedom. What you call freedom is anarchy.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #231 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

You don't know freedom. What you call freedom is anarchy.

Freedom is slavery.
War is peace.
Ignorance is strength.

Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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post #232 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzguru View Post

Freedom is slavery.
War is peace.
Ignorance is strength.

To be honest, the Republicans strongly identify with all three of those. I don't identify with any.

Freedom is slavery -> PATRIOT Act.
War is Peace -> Pre-emptive attack.
Ignorance is strength -> Attacks against 'liberal elitism', the 'left wing media', and all things scientific that might question a literal interpretation of religion or the sanctity of the free market.

Yep. You've made a damn good point.
post #233 of 249
That was a reference from a book. Do you know which book?

Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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post #234 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzguru View Post

That was a reference from a book. Do you know which book?

What's especially ironic is how tonton was recently arguing that people doing peaceful things were not actually being peaceful at all. It's also interesting how his examples of freedom (for himself) appear to require using the threat of violence against and enslaving others to provide the "freedom" he speaks of ("free" transportation, "free" education, "free" healthcare, etc.) and how limiting the right of persons to own devices that can be used in their own defense but allowing only official sanctioned persons to own such devices is some form of "freedom."

Its more and more clear all the time that tonton (and his philosophical brethren) subscribe to a position of what can be called positive liberty and positive rights. I, personally, do not. I believe in negative liberty and negative rights and have concluded that there are fundamental flaws, inconsistencies and contradictions inherent in the positive liberty and positive rights school of thought.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #235 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzguru View Post

That was a reference from a book. Do you know which book?

Oh, please.

And there's no irony here when you look at my post. Those are the things republicans stand for. Go ahead, deny it.
post #236 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Oh, please.

And there's no irony here when you look at my post. Those are the things republicans stand for. Go ahead, deny it.

No, seriously. Do you know which book?

And the only difference between Republicans and Democrats is in which ways they want to use government to control everyone else.

Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

Reply
post #237 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzguru View Post

No, seriously. Do you know which book?


Quote:
And the only difference between Republicans and Democrats is in which ways they want to use government to control everyone else.

Fair enough. Republicans want to instill control to make themselves richer and to punish or oppress the people they don't like. Democrats (in theory) want to instill control for the greater good, especially for those who are underprivileged.
post #238 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Republicans want to instill control to make themselves richer and to punish or oppress the people they don't like. Democrats (in theory) want to instill control for the greater good, especially for those who are underprivileged.

What's scary is that you actually believe that.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #239 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post



Fair enough. Republicans want to instill control to make themselves richer and to punish or oppress the people they don't like. Democrats (in theory) want to instill control for the greater good, especially for those who are underprivileged.

And I'm the one who doesn't think for myself.

(Which book, tonton?)

Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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post #240 of 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzguru View Post

And I'm the one who doesn't think for myself.

(Which book, tonton?)

Dude I know more about dystopian literature than you know about libertarianism. Fuck off. You know as well as I do that if for some reason I were an uneducated moron, I could have just googled it. And Orwell is way overrated. Huxley is better philosophically as well as linguistically. At least Orwell is better than that hack Bradbury, who wrote using strictly elementary school vocabulary and narrative flow. Loved the story though.

Besides Huxley, I greatly recommend Houellebecq (and his translators).
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