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T-Mobile USA customers shouldn't expect Apple's iPhone for at least 1 year

post #1 of 48
Thread Starter 
U.S. customers of T-Mobile likely will not have access to Apple's iPhone for at least one year, assuming a proposed acquisition from AT&T is granted federal approval.

Following the announcement on Sunday that AT&T plans to buy T-Mobile to create the largest wireless provider in the U.S., a list of frequently asked questions were posted on the official T-Mobile website. In that list, one question is specifically devoted to the iPhone, which is currently only available to AT&T and Verizon customers.

"T-Mobile USA remains an independent company," the FAQ reads. "The acquisition is expected to be completed in approximately 12 months. We do not offer the iPhone. We offer cutting edge devices like the Samsung Galaxy S 4G and coming soon our new Sidekick 4G."

T-Mobile cannot yet offer the iPhone because its wireless network is not compatible with the 3G radio found in the GSM version of Apple's best-selling smartphone. And that won't change until AT&T's proposed acquisition of T-Mobile is approved by federal regulators -- a milestone that is by no means guaranteed.

The merging of customer bases from AT&T and T-Mobile would create a total of about 130 million users, making AT&T the largest carrier in the U.S. AT&T has touted that the acquisition of T-Mobile will help to speed up its own existing nationwide network.

Though they operate on different radio frequencies, the networks of AT&T and T-Mobile have a common technology base with 3G UMTS. That will make it easier for AT&T to merge the two networks and ensure that handsets from both companies will be compatible on the same network.

T-Mobile's FAQ also notes that the acquisition will offer "significant benefits" for customers, improving network quality and boosting speeds.

"The merger will ensure the deployment of a robust 4G LTE network to 95% of the U.S. population, something neither company would achieve on its own," it reads. "Also, because of our compatible networks and spectrum, the customers of T-Mobile USA and AT&T will experience improved voice and data service almost immediately after the networks are integrated."

Customers were also advised that they should not wait to sign up with T-Mobile or upgrade their handset, as the company remains independent until the deal is approved. The company will also honor all contracted plans that are entered into before the change of ownership.

AT&T announced on Sunday its plans to acquire T-Mobile for $39 billion. The cash and stock deal, if approved, would give Deutsche Telekom, the owner of T-Mobile USA, an 8 percent stake in AT&T.
post #2 of 48
Or... they could expect it now. Or at any time over the last three and a half years.

Yes, "legitimately". It works now. You don't even need a data plan. It's the only respite in an idiotic world.

Originally posted by Relic

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post #3 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

T-Mobile cannot yet offer the iPhone because its wireless network is not compatible with the 3G radio found in the GSM version of Apple's best-selling smartphone. And that won't change until AT&T's proposed acquisition of T-Mobile is approved by federal regulators -- a milestone that is by no means guaranteed.

Or Apple could include the AWS band in a future iPhone. Why is this option being completely ignored without an explanation as to why its not possible?
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post #4 of 48
All I am going to say is expect the unexpected. I have a feeling this will happen quickly. Some back channel persuation will be done and instead of a year the approval will come in months and "tmobile" will have iphone 5. Thats my feeling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

U.S. customers of T-Mobile likely will not have access to Apple's iPhone for at least one year, assuming a proposed acquisition from AT&T is granted federal approval.

Following the announcement on Sunday that AT&T plans to buy T-Mobile to create the largest wireless provider in the U.S., a list of frequently asked questions were posted on the official T-Mobile website. In that list, one question is specifically devoted to the iPhone, which is currently only available to AT&T and Verizon customers.

"T-Mobile USA remains an independent company," the FAQ reads. "The acquisition is expected to be completed in approximately 12 months. We do not offer the iPhone. We offer cutting edge devices like the Samsung Galaxy S 4G and coming soon our new Sidekick 4G."

T-Mobile cannot yet offer the iPhone because its wireless network is not compatible with the 3G radio found in the GSM version of Apple's best-selling smartphone. And that won't change until AT&T's proposed acquisition of T-Mobile is approved by federal regulators -- a milestone that is by no means guaranteed.

The merging of customer bases from AT&T and T-Mobile would create a total of about 130 million users, making AT&T the largest carrier in the U.S. AT&T has touted that the acquisition of T-Mobile will help to speed up its own existing nationwide network.

Though they operate on different radio frequencies, the networks of AT&T and T-Mobile have a common technology base with 3G UMTS. That will make it easier for AT&T to merge the two networks and ensure that handsets from both companies will be compatible on the same network.

T-Mobile's FAQ also notes that the acquisition will offer "significant benefits" for customers, improving network quality and boosting speeds.

"The merger will ensure the deployment of a robust 4G LTE network to 95% of the U.S. population, something neither company would achieve on its own," it reads. "Also, because of our compatible networks and spectrum, the customers of T-Mobile USA and AT&T will experience improved voice and data service almost immediately after the networks are integrated."

Customers were also advised that they should not wait to sign up with T-Mobile or upgrade their handset, as the company remains independent until the deal is approved. The company will also honor all contracted plans that are entered into before the change of ownership.

AT&T announced on Sunday its plans to acquire T-Mobile for $39 billion. The cash and stock deal, if approved, would give Deutsche Telekom, the owner of T-Mobile USA, an 8 percent stake in AT&T.
post #5 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ny3ranger View Post

All I am going to say is expect the unexpected. I have a feeling this will happen quickly. Some back channel persuation will be done and instead of a year the approval will come in months and "tmobile" will have iphone 5. Thats my feeling.

*blink*

Why? What's the point? They're one company in the end. Whether the iPhone supports 1700MHz is irrelevant, as all towers would be changed to do all the same frequencies, anyway.

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post #6 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Or Apple could include the AWS band in a future iPhone. Why is this option being completely ignored without an explanation as to why its not possible?

It is certainly possible. Nokia has phones on the market (the N8 and several others) with five band 3G -all the bands in the iPhone 4 plus T-Mobile's AWS band. If Nokia can do it, I am sure so can Apple.

My hunch is that until now AT&T was actively opposed to Apple releasing an iPhone supporting this band, as once this happened people would have been able to take unlocked iPhones (either unauthorised unlocks, or legitimate ones imported from abroad) and use them with 3G on T-Mobile's network. On the other hand, they now probably want T-Mobile customers to get the iPhone, as they will then become AT&T customers when this deal goes through. I would think Apple would like to support it if they can, as it would allow them to provide iPhones for additional carriers in two or three other countries as well as the US. In addition, AT&T is likely to want to get phones supporting all bands into its customers' hands as soon as possible, as they will work better once once the networks are merged.

However, this press release seems to suggest that there will not be a compatible iPhone this year. It could just be that the author of the press release doesn't know what is going on with various parts of AT&T, Apple, and T-Mobile. Given Apple's liking for secrecy, it is very possible.
post #7 of 48
iPhone 6 at the earliest.....
post #8 of 48
I glad I stopped pulling my hair out and read this timely article.

I hope sprint joins verizon


9
whats in a name ? 
beatles
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post #9 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjj122 View Post

It is certainly possible. Nokia has phones on the market (the N8 and several others) with five band 3G -all the bands in the iPhone 4 plus T-Mobile's AWS band. If Nokia can do it, I am sure so can Apple.

My hunch is that until now AT&T was actively opposed to Apple releasing an iPhone supporting this band, as once this happened people would have been able to take unlocked iPhones (either unauthorised unlocks, or legitimate ones imported from abroad) and use them with 3G on T-Mobile's network. On the other hand, they now probably want T-Mobile customers to get the iPhone, as they will then become AT&T customers when this deal goes through. I would think Apple would like to support it if they can, as it would allow them to provide iPhones for additional carriers in two or three other countries as well as the US. In addition, AT&T is likely to want to get phones supporting all bands into its customers' hands as soon as possible, as they will work better once once the networks are merged.

However, this press release seems to suggest that there will not be a compatible iPhone this year. It could just be that the author of the press release doesn't know what is going on with various parts of AT&T, Apple, and T-Mobile. Given Apple's liking for secrecy, it is very possible.

The iPhone 4 was the 2nd pentaband phone on the market, though only 4 of the 5 bands were ever in use this past year.

The 5th band was for NTT do co mo, Japans largest carrier. Apples currently only with Softbank, their 3rd largest carrier. Maybe this was to leverage a position against Softbank or win favour with NTT do co mo. Or maybe they thought they would ink a deal with them that year but it fell through, or simply a placeholder band for some odd component reason and their contract forbade them from using T-Mobile USAs 1700MHz spectrum.

Since it looks like AT&T will keep T-Mo as a value carrier Id think that AT&T still wouldnt want the AWS band in the iPhone 5. They might not be able to prevent Apple from including that band per their contract* so they might have to pay Apple to not include that band. That would be funny if true.


* The contract or part of the contract that prohibits Apple from offering the iPhone to other carriers or at least to CDMA-based carriers is over, but that doesnt mean the entire contract or all contracts are completed.
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post #10 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Or Apple could include the AWS band in a future iPhone. Why is this option being completely ignored without an explanation as to why its not possible?

One of the reasons often given against a GSM/CDMA iPhone is the need to include antennas tuned to the addtional fequencies and there simply not being enough room (especially given Apple's drive to make things smaller and thinner). The probably becomes even worse if there is a GSM/CDMA phone, which eventually there may need to be to support Verizon's transition to LTE.

Combined with my suspicion that ATT might want to phase out the Tmobile 3G frequencies to use the more standard frequencies, any iPhone support for that band would be even more short-lived than CDMA support (and we all know how strongly many people here held that Apple would be foolish to support CDMA).
post #11 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

I glad I stopped pulling my hair out and read this timely article.

I hope sprint joins verizon


9

That would be interesting. But what would happen to wi-max? Surely Verizon would have no interest in swallowing that pill. It's completely at odds with their LTE plans. Sprint's wi-max network likely isn't extensive enough to stand on it's own, but if it is perhaps it could be spun off as an independent data-only network. Then have the voice/3G Sprint customers merge with Verizon.

The ATT/Tmobile merger makes more sense because the networks are mostly compatible and ATT needed to shore up it's network. From the articles I've read, part of the problem ATT had was they didn't have access to the wireless bandwidth to expand. So instead they simply bought a company that owned part of the spectrum. If Verizon already has the spectrum they need to support their plans, that would be one less reason to consider buying Sprint.
post #12 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

That would be interesting. But what would happen to wi-max? Surely Verizon would have no interest in swallowing that pill. It's completely at odds with their LTE plans. Sprint's wi-max network likely isn't extensive enough to stand on it's own, but if it is perhaps it could be spun off as an independent data-only network. Then have the voice/3G Sprint customers merge with Verizon.

The ATT/Tmobile merger makes more sense because the networks are mostly compatible and ATT needed to shore up it's network. From the articles I've read, part of the problem ATT had was they didn't have access to the wireless bandwidth to expand. So instead they simply bought a company that owned part of the spectrum. If Verizon already has the spectrum they need to support their plans, that would be one less reason to consider buying Sprint.

I seem to recall Clearwire saying that WiMAX could be reconfigured to run as LTE much cheaper than putting up new LTE. I think they were also preparing to test LTE, thus moving away from WiMAX altogether.

Overall, I think getting Sprints customers and becoming the largest US carrier again would be more than enough reason. Besides, even if they have to decommission all the WiMAX in use nearly everyone is still using devices that are on the same 2G and 3G network type and frequencies, which isnt something AT&T can say about acquiring T-Mobile USA.
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post #13 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

..... assuming a proposed acquisition from AT&T is granted federal approval.

It will be. ATT will make some 'concessions' by promising to roll out 4G quickly and to provide extra resources for services to 'rural' areas, and everyone go home happy.
post #14 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ny3ranger View Post

All I am going to say is expect the unexpected. I have a feeling this will happen quickly. Some back channel persuation will be done and instead of a year the approval will come in months and "tmobile" will have iphone 5. Thats my feeling.

Agreed! I'm going to take the optimistic route and hope that it will be a good thing long term. Since I definitely want the iPhone the sooner the better-this will make my new "acquisition" that much smoother!
post #15 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

The iPhone 4 was the 2nd pentaband phone on the market, though only 4 of the 5 bands were ever in use this past year.

The 5th band was for NTT do co mo, Japans largest carrier. Apples currently only with Softbank, their 3rd largest carrier. Maybe this was to leverage a position against Softbank or win favour with NTT do co mo. Or maybe they thought they would ink a deal with them that year but it fell through, or simply a placeholder band for some odd component reason and their contract forbade them from using T-Mobile USAs 1700MHz spectrum.

Well, yes and no. UMTS band VI (usually referred to as "800MHz" in Japan) is just a subset of band V (usually referred to as "850MHz" in North America). Note that the channel numbers are the same and the spacing between the uplink and the downlink is the same, so that hardware that can support one can pretty much automatically support the other. (There are sometimes software issues between Japan and the rest of the world though). They are listed separately in the UMTS spec so they are sometimes described as different bands, but they aren't different in any meaningful sense and I was counting them as a single band. This is consistent with the way Apple describes it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UMTS_frequency_bands

http://www.apple.com/iphone/specs.html

I think Apple provided support for Band VI because they already more or less supported it due to supporting Band V.

In any event, the Nokia N8 (and a couple of other recent Nokia phones) support all bands that the iPhone 4 supports plus one more - the AWS band used by T-Mobile, and a couple of other networks in Canada and elswhere in the Americas.


Quote:
Since it looks like AT&T will keep T-Mo as a value carrier Id think that AT&T still wouldnt want the AWS band in the iPhone 5. They might not be able to prevent Apple from including that band per their contract* so they might have to pay Apple to not include that band. That would be funny if true.

When the merger goes through and the networks are merged, the new AT&T is going to own spectrum and 3G networks operating on 850MHz, 1900MHz and AWS. Regardless of whether they keep T-Mobile as a value brand or not, they are going to want to merge the networks to save money. There may be multiple brands, but there will only be one network. However, this network will likely use spectrum on all three bands, because AT&T will want to provide as much capacity as possible in places like New York and San Francisco and more spectrum equals more capacity. Once this is the case, AT&T is going to want as large a portion of the handsets on its network as possible to support all three bands, as that way will lead to better service for customers and a larger ability to manage traffic on the part of AT&T. This makes me think that AT&T would like AWS support on the iPhone 5 even if there is no use for it yet, because many of those handsets will still be on the network in a year's time, and if they are it will allow AT&T to provide better service then.

But we will see.
post #16 of 48
Believe me... It won't be a year... When my slave contract expires - I'm gone!!
post #17 of 48
Yes, so we the consumers have less choices and we get screwed more. That sounds great.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

I glad I stopped pulling my hair out and read this timely article.

I hope sprint joins verizon


9
post #18 of 48
Everyone except T-Mobile customers who hate AT&T and Verizon and enjoyed T-Mobiles competitive prices.

Most consumers are sheep, so I am sure they will be thrilled with the continue increasing prices and fewer choices.

The government is a joke though and they aren't concerned with anti-competition, so the deal will go through.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

It will be. ATT will make some 'concessions' by promising to roll out 4G quickly and to provide extra resources for services to 'rural' areas, and everyone go home happy.
post #19 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I seem to recall Clearwire saying that WiMAX could be reconfigured to run as LTE much cheaper than putting up new LTE. I think they were also preparing to test LTE, thus moving away from WiMAX altogether.

Overall, I think getting Sprints customers and becoming the largest US carrier again would be more than enough reason. Besides, even if they have to decommission all the WiMAX in use nearly everyone is still using devices that are on the same 2G and 3G network type and frequencies, which isnt something AT&T can say about acquiring T-Mobile USA.

Or Google buys Sprint:

http://www.macworld.com/article/1586...ce_sprint.html
post #20 of 48
This is terrible reporting! T-Mobile getting an iPhone has NOTHING to do with AT&T's acquisition. If anything, T-Mobile users will become AT&T users, and then they will be transitioned into a company that offers the iPhone. But T-Mobile as a company is not getting an iPhone for being bought by AT&T. T-Mobile will get the iPhone IF and WHEN Apple supports the 1700 MHz spectrum. But if this deal goes through, T-Mobile might not be a carrier anymore by the time that happens. Sure, AT&T will use 1700 MHz, and Apple might support it, but it will still be with AT&T's lousy data caps and high prices.
post #21 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnviroG View Post

Agreed! I'm going to take the optimistic route and hope that it will be a good thing long term. Since I definitely want the iPhone the sooner the better-this will make my new "acquisition" that much smoother!

Would make a "One more thing..." Steve Jobs moment at the Keynote of the intro of iPhone 5... maybe?!

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post #22 of 48
Of course it will be approved. AT&T owns enough Congressmen and leaders of regulatory agencies to get it through easily.
post #23 of 48
Anyone have any ideas how this might affect those like me who use unlocked iPhones on T-Mobile and occasionally use Edge for internet? Will my Edge connection still work?
post #24 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by am8449 View Post

Anyone have any ideas how this might affect those like me who use unlocked iPhones on T-Mobile and occasionally use Edge for internet? Will my Edge connection still work?

Sure. You'll be forced to pay for an AT&T iPhone data plan, but otherwise it will still work.

Originally posted by Relic

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post #25 of 48
I think this pretty much clinches that nobody will be able to buy an iPhone on a T-Mobile contract before this acquisition is complete. Apple almost certainly won't build a separate GSM iPhone just for T-Mobile's 3G network that is just going to be acquired by AT&T in a few months anyway. Once the acquisition is complete, customers will be paying AT&T's rates, not T-Mobile's. You can pretty much bet that these customers that are "grandfathered" on T-Mobile plans will probably have to give them up and sign a contract for a new plan the next time they buy a phone.
post #26 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

I glad I stopped pulling my hair out and read this timely article.

I hope sprint joins verizon


9

yea i would love that, too. sprint is the worst phone company in the world.
post #27 of 48
Given the growth in wireless broadband data, maybe AT&T plans something more radical than merely using the AWS to provide the same services as on its existing network ...

The AWS band allocations [from 1710 to 1755 MHz, and 2110 to 2155 MHz] are only used in the US and Canada ... and given the global approach of migrating the 1800 MHz band [1710-1785 MHz and 1805-1880 MHz) to LTE (eg here in Australia with Telstra), it maybe possible over the longer term .... that AT&T is going to 'split' for want of a better word ... and use the 1700 MHz spectrum to provide TD-LTE and the 2100 Mhz spectrum to provide UMTS/WCDMA - TDD ...

Both allocations are within global standards and are consistent with the bursting requirement which AT&T flagged when then bought the Qualcom MediFLO spectrum at 700 MHz .... then AT&T indicated that it intends to deploy this spectrum as supplemental downlink, using carrier aggregation technology. If you are not familar with this see http://lteworld.org/blog/carrier-agg...n-lte-advanced ... Such technology with be used in LTE-Advanced a true 4G technology ...

Obviously this means that existing customers with AWS only handsets (and I am not sure there are many especially in the days of quad and penta band phones... and the move to smatphones) will be required to get new handsets....

So all up AT&T is being real smart, in my book, and securing spectrum for its wireless broadband future....
post #28 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by telecomsroadwarrier View Post

Given the growth in wireless broadband data, maybe AT&T plans something more radical than merely using the AWS to provide the same services as on its existing network ...

The AWS band allocations [from 1710 to 1755 MHz, and 2110 to 2155 MHz] are only used in the US and Canada ... and given the global approach of migrating the 1800 MHz band [1710-1785 MHz and 1805-1880 MHz) to LTE (eg here in Australia with Telstra), it maybe possible over the longer term .... that AT&T is going to 'split' for want of a better word ... and use the 1700 MHz spectrum to provide TD-LTE and the 2100 Mhz spectrum to provide UMTS/WCDMA - TDD ...

That would give us a lot more international uniformity, too. In the US you have the PCS and AWS bands in use (UMTS bands II and IV) and in Europe and much of the rest of the world you have the DCS ("1800MHz", UMTS band III) and IMT-2000 ("2100MHz", UMTS band I) in use. Between them, these bands use more or less the same frequencies, but they are paired differently and use different choices for uplink and downlink. Going to TDD and eliminating the idea of using different bands for uplink and downlink means that US and international allocations become the same. And this takes into account that data services are asymmetric anyway, so it is win-win. I think it is going to take a while to get there from where we are now though. Although the fact that the 1800MHz band does not seem to be being used for 3G/W-CDMA anywhere does provide an opportunity.

I am just writing as I am thinking here. Yes, basically, I agree. That's a good point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by telecomsroadwarrier View Post

Obviously this means that existing customers with AWS only handsets (and I am not sure there are many especially in the days of quad and penta band phones... and the move to smatphones) will be required to get new handsets....

So all up AT&T is being real smart, in my book, and securing spectrum for its wireless broadband future....

I don't think there are many AWS only handsets. Most that I have seen are dual band and support both AWS and IMT-2000 (UMTS band I).

I think AT&T are being smart and securing spectrum however it is going to be used. They merge with T-Mobile, and initially have W-CDMA at 850MHz, 1900MHz and AWS. At some point they refarm at least one of these bands, depending on what technologies are dominant.

This looks a really good deal for AT&T however I look at it.
post #29 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Or Apple could include the AWS band in a future iPhone. Why is this option being completely ignored without an explanation as to why its not possible?

Because T-Mobile is the only company that uses it? It isn't worth it to add that to the radios for just a tiny customer base. If this deal goes through, they will leave that frequency and move to the ones everyone else is using. The only reason they use it is because they couldn't get the bandwidth in the other frequencies.
post #30 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

*blink*

Why? What's the point? They're one company in the end. Whether the iPhone supports 1700MHz is irrelevant, as all towers would be changed to do all the same frequencies, anyway.

There is the little problem of the people using phones from T-Mobile that only use 1700 MHz. When the switch comes, they will be cut off unless their phones also work on the other frequencies.
post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

There is the little problem of the people using phones from T-Mobile that only use 1700 MHz. When the switch comes, they will be cut off unless their phones also work on the other frequencies.

Wha... there are phones that only use 1700?

Okay, then doesn't that make the decision for them? AT&T will have to add 1700 to their towers and the rest of the frequencies to T-Mobile's towers. That'd be pentaband coverage across both networks, then, right?

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post #32 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

Everyone except T-Mobile customers who hate AT&T and Verizon and enjoyed T-Mobiles competitive prices.

Most consumers are sheep, so I am sure they will be thrilled with the continue increasing prices and fewer choices.

The government is a joke though and they aren't concerned with anti-competition, so the deal will go through.

The only reason why both Sprint and T-Mobile have low prices and extra features is because they are both failing carriers. Both companies have been losing customers, and money. Companies that have that problem often use lower pricing as a way of trying to keep customers, and of getting new ones.

But it's not working. Sprint had a better quarter, last, but overall, both companies are doing poorly. Even lower pricing and enticing plans aren't preventing customers from leaving.

So what would happen if AT&T didn't buy T-Mobile? Well, after a couple of years, it might go bankrupt. I can't really say how long it would take, but it's not well. At some point DT, the owner, would have to dump it.

What people aren't understanding about this is these low prices are just artificial contrivances made up in a desperate attempt to save the business. As it hasn't been working, it couldn't last.

If AT&T didn't buy this now, as a whole company, they would be buying bits and pieces in a few years anyway.

The only way Sprint and T-Mobile would be able to stay independent is for the government here to do what the governments in the EU do, that is, give billions away to companies to keep them solvent, and to not do so as a loan, but as a gift. Some of the EU's biggest companies are here today just because of that.

So if those on T-Mobile who are so mad about this want the US to give them billions every few years, well, ok. But then, there will be other companies from other industries who will come knock g on that door as well, with just as good a reason for a bailout. So we can give it to all of them, and pay the higher taxes that come with it.

Really, we're between a rock and a hard place. Tell DT they can't sell the company, and tell others they can't buy it, and see it go down. Or have the Gov. pay for it. Otherwise, we can just let AT&T buy it, even though we're not happy about that either.

And again remember, those low prices aren't being given because they're nice, it's because they're desperate for the business, and it isn't working.
post #33 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by macosxp View Post

This is terrible reporting! T-Mobile getting an iPhone has NOTHING to do with AT&T's acquisition. If anything, T-Mobile users will become AT&T users, and then they will be transitioned into a company that offers the iPhone. But T-Mobile as a company is not getting an iPhone for being bought by AT&T. T-Mobile will get the iPhone IF and WHEN Apple supports the 1700 MHz spectrum. But if this deal goes through, T-Mobile might not be a carrier anymore by the time that happens. Sure, AT&T will use 1700 MHz, and Apple might support it, but it will still be with AT&T's lousy data caps and high prices.

What you're saying isn't completely true. T-Mobile and DT have been saying that their poor performance is due to not having the iPhone. We can't comment on that, because only they know.

As for 1700, it's assumed that it will disappear after the networks are merged. AT&T commented on this.
post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by old-wiz View Post

Of course it will be approved. AT&T owns enough Congressmen and leaders of regulatory agencies to get it through easily.

That's just a ridiculous statement. There are philosophical reasons why Republicans and Democrats have differing opinions on this. Democrats, during the Clinton years imposed a 30% max in each market, which the Bush administration eliminated. It's not a matter of owning anyone. It's a matter of politics overall. Conservatives will approve of this deal, while liberals will oppose it.
post #35 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Wha... there are phones that only use 1700?

Okay, then doesn't that make the decision for them? AT&T will have to add 1700 to their towers and the rest of the frequencies to T-Mobile's towers. That'd be pentaband coverage across both networks, then, right?

Well, I don't know if there are phones that ONLY use 1700, but if there are, it would be a problem.

This stuff costs billions to do. It may not be worth it. If there are people with phones that only use 1700 for 3G, it would be cheaper to give them new phones.
post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

Yes, so we the consumers have less choices and we get screwed more. That sounds great.



apple is doomed

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post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

That would be interesting. But what would happen to wi-max? Surely Verizon would have no interest in swallowing that pill. It's completely at odds with their LTE plans. Sprint's wi-max network likely isn't extensive enough to stand on it's own, but if it is perhaps it could be spun off as an independent data-only network. Then have the voice/3G Sprint customers merge with Verizon.

The ATT/Tmobile merger makes more sense because the networks are mostly compatible and ATT needed to shore up it's network. From the articles I've read, part of the problem ATT had was they didn't have access to the wireless bandwidth to expand. So instead they simply b

ought a company that owned part of the spectrum. If Verizon already has the spectrum they need to support their plans, that would be one less reason to consider buying Sprint.

I was joking


We have 4 to 8 major tele carriers BUILDING out MASSIVE 4g/7g systems that duplicate each others towers fiber optic line and the such .

Billions upon billions spent so hulu can download for 8 minutes and then fade away on me .

The Verizon iphone I just bought has dropped a few dozen calls already . Calls MY verizon crap 23 dollar cellphone never dropped .


the joke is on us


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post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

We have 4 to 8 major tele carriers BUILDING out MASSIVE 4g/7g systems that duplicate each others towers fiber optic line and the such.

You mean we have two telecoms who meet in a room and collude over pricing and features for customer plans.

Quote:
Billions upon billions spent so hulu can download for 8 minutes and then fade away on me .

You mean tens of thousands spent so that we can have 4GB bandwidth caps to render streaming video pointless in the first place, right?

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

You mean we have two telecoms who meet in a room and collude over pricing and features for customer plans.



You mean tens of thousands spent so that we can have 4GB bandwidth caps to render streaming video pointless in the first place, right?

No, neither of those statements you've made are right. Bruce was right this time.
post #40 of 48
oK GLOVES OFF TIME

THIS ARTICLE misses the real point ,

If said merger is approved . Any one can then walk in any brand>newly named tmob/att store and buy a iphone.

The Pimple faced clerk justs signs the buyer up and thats that . No one asks about what system they want unless their from Canada. ATT is also buying T-Mobile'S customer BASE also . THEY MAY want to sell to those dudes to cover the 40 billion they just spent.

So for all you nay sayers one mo time .
You walk into a T-Mobile store and buy a iphone . You pay .You leave with AN iphone and the girl .

The fact that is may not run on aT-Mobile system is MOOT .



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  • T-Mobile USA customers shouldn't expect Apple's iPhone for at least 1 year
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