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Samsung announces new Galaxy Tab models with iPad prices

post #1 of 140
Thread Starter 
Samsung has ditched the boxy new 10.1 inch Galaxy Tab it debuted just a month ago to announce a new model that is as thin and light as Apple iPad 2 and priced the same, targeted for an early June launch.

As light, thin, cheap and fast as iPad, in two months

Samsung showed off a new but not yet functioning 10.1 inch Galaxy Tab with a case just .33 inches or 8.6 mm thick (iPad 2 is .34 inches thick, a difference of a quarter of a millimeter) and reportedly weighing 1.31 pounds or 595 grams (iPad 2 is 1.33 lbs or 600 grams), after describing its original 2011 tablet products at Februarys' Mobile World Congress as "inadequate" compared to iPad 2.

Also like Apple's currently shipping iPad 2 is Samsung's use of a 1Ghz dual core CPU, which Engadget speculated to be an NVIDIA Tegra 2, despite the fact that Samsung builds its own Hummingbird application processors like the one used in its existing 7 inch Galaxy Tab.

Samsung also fabricates Apple's A5 used in the iPad 2, but does not design that chip nor does it have rights to use it. Samsung's previous Hummingbird is similar but not identical to Apple's A4, indicating that it may likely be building its own equivalent to the A5. However, Google's initial support for NVIDIA's Tegra 2 in Android 3.0 Honeycomb could conceivably push Samsung to use another manufacturer's chips in order to get the product to market quickly.

The new 10.1 inch model will be joined by a 8.9 inch version. Samsung says the larger model will start at $499 for the 16GB version and $599 for the 32GB model (both WiFi-only), while the smaller version will start at $469 and $569 for the same capacities, respectively.



Runs Honeycomb like Motorola Xoom

Motorola disappointed Android enthusiasts hoping for an affordable Honeycomb tablet by pricing its 10.1 inch Xoom at $800, and only bringing prices down towards the iPad after launch. Like the Xoom, Samsung's new tablets ignore the 7 inch tablet market that failed to materialize last fall, just as Apple's chief executive Steve Jobs had predicted.

Samsung will also add a layer of its own differentiated software on top of Google's Android 3.0 Honeycomb, setting the new tablets apart from similar offerings from Motorola and Toshiba. Like those other Honeycomb tablets however, Samsung will use a 16:9 aspect ratio and a 1280x800 resolution, making it more suited to movie playback rather than aimed at general handheld computing like Apple's iPad.

Other differences from iPad include a build in microSD slot and marginally better front and rear cameras with an LED flash, although they're still not adequate for taking photos at just 2 to 3 megapixels each.

Aspects unlike Apple

There's also a number of things Samsung isn't copying from Apple. The company has no retail presence, relying upon big box retailers to sell its Galaxy Tab, something that didn't work well last fall. It also isn't developing its own platform or software store, delegating that task to Google.

And notably, Samsung isn't developing its own apps, as Apple did last year in releasing Pages, Keynote and Numbers, and this year in releasing Photo Booth, FaceTime, iMovie and GarageBand for its latest iPad. There is currently only a small sampling of apps optimized for Android 3.0, providing much less general functionality for tablets that run it. So far, non-iPad tablet sales have been unremarkable, which has done little to stoke enthusiastic commercial development outside of Apple's App Store.

Samsung will be adding its own "Social Hub" layer of software on Android 3.0 Honeycomb, which "will aggregate email, instant messaging, contacts, calendar and social network connections into a single interface," something that is likely to replace rather than encourage third party development.

Android's app market

Android has had problems attracting real development to its existing smartphone platform, despite having a large installed base that is comparable in size to Apple's iPhone. In part, this is due to mistakes Google has made in running its Android Market, something Amazon hopes to correct with its own online store for Android apps.

But fractionalization of Android OS releases, which rarely make their way to handset users within less than 3 to 6 months after they are finished and are often never released for some phones, are also a problem for Android software developers. Most Android smartphone users are still using Android 2.2 Froyo, which was released a year ago.

Google may be able to improve this situation in tablets, where its partners should be able to distribute updates without as much delay from carriers. However, there's still no evidence that there's any real market for tablets outside of Apple's iPad, which is aimed at delivering a "post-PC" product that is very different than the wide array of tablets that have existed before it and continue to be designed, all of which seem to focus on hardware specifications rather than real utility.

Samsung, like Motorola, appears to be primarily targeting web browser users, with emphasis on HD video and Adobe Flash, something that is still promised to be finished soon. But as with smartphones, mobile users seem to be more interested in responsive apps that perform a particular task well rather than just buying a web browser appliance, something that has never really gained traction in the market despite many attempts by Be, Palm, Sony and others.

post #2 of 140
Given the timing and drastic size reduction, is there any reasonable way a person can hope that this doesn't have heat or battery issues?

I mean, if it was that easy to make smaller, wouldn't they have done it that way originally? Apple has been pushing themselves to the limit to get to where they are on size.
post #3 of 140
Even if I were an Apple hater and thus intent on buying a clone, the speed these clone manufactures abandon ship on a product would make me have serious second thoughts about my hate for Apple!
Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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post #4 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by iCarbon View Post

Given the timing and drastic size reduction, is there any reasonable way a person can hope that this doesn't have heat or battery issues?

I mean, if it was that easy to make smaller, wouldn't they have done it that way originally? Apple has been pushing themselves to the limit to get to where they are on size.


and that is the reason they don't mention battery life.
post #5 of 140
This article is genuinely defensive and terribly written. The shots at the Android app market are particularly perplexing, because the market has been growing very rapidly and almost all of the top iPhone apps have or will shortly have Android variants.

It also doesn't mention that the battery is the same size as the iPad 2's and is rated at 10 hours for video like the iPad 2, and it has a superior screen to the iPad 2. If anything, the screen is the highlight. It's the world's first PLS screen in consumer electronics, which is the evolutionary success to the IPS screen in the iPads. PLS screens are 15% cheaper, 10% brighter, and have better viewing angles.

MacRumors reported in February that Apple wanted to use the PLS panel in the iPad 2, but they ultimately didn't. Samsung holds 30 patents on the screen so it is the world's only manufacturer.

Also, Flash is still "soon" for Honeycomb, but the beta is out now and it's GPU-accelerated.
post #6 of 140
Even though I don't know very much about it yet, I would say this is the first tablet that actually is in the same playing field at the iPad.

However, I'm assuming that it matches things set up by Apple, like battery life, performance, and their spin of Android being completely functional (unlike the original Galaxy Tab).

I guess we have to wait until it's released to see.
post #7 of 140
I do not get how Samsung thinks it can compete head to head with the iPad. The only hope Samsung has at sellling these things is to significantly undercut the iPads price. If this thing was selling for $299 it might have a chance, but matching the price of the iPad for a cloner makes no sense. No one in their right mind would buy the cloner if you can get the real thing for the same price.
post #8 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherian View Post

This article is genuinely defensive and terribly written. The shots at the Android app market are particularly perplexing, because the market has been growing very rapidly and almost all of the top iPhone apps have or will shortly have Android variants.

It also doesn't mention that the battery is the same size as the iPad 2's and is rated at 10 hours for video like the iPad 2, and it has a superior screen to the iPad 2. If anything, the screen is the highlight. It's the world's first PLS screen, which is the evolutionary success to the IPS screen in the iPads. PLS screens are 15% cheaper, 10% brighter, and have better viewing angles.

Wow, that didn't take long. I mean to turn this into another childish DED bashing thread.
post #9 of 140
WTF

How did they do that? So fast!

And how did they get it that thin? Without the unibody structure?

They don't have the magnets though and the smart cover. And the Apps. And the integrated user interface.

Good to see iPad 2 has a little friend to play with. It'll make iPad 3 only better.
post #10 of 140
As of now, it's vaporware.

I saw a dumb video on engadget and they were showing both tablets, but they couldn't even be powered on. What's the use of showing a video of two blank screens with nothing on them?
post #11 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr O View Post

WTF

How did they do that? So fast!

And how did they get it that thin? Without the unibody structure?

They don't have the magnets though … and the smart cover. And the Apps. And the integrated user interface.

Good to see iPad 2 has a little friend to play with. It'll make iPad 3 only better.

The Honeycomb UI is the one reason I cancelled my iPad 2 order and will be waiting for the Tab 10.1. I'm far too much of a multitasker to comfortably use the iOS UI. The lack of real tabbed browsing is massively annoying as well -- Honeycomb's Chrome-like browser is a huge plus for me, considering 99% of my use will be web browsing. The fact that it has a superior gmail client and notifications is also what pushes me over the edge, as when I'm not using it to browse the web, I'll be in gmail.
post #12 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherian View Post

This article is genuinely defensive and terribly written. The shots at the Android app market are particularly perplexing, because the market has been growing very rapidly and almost all of the top iPhone apps have or will shortly have Android variants.

Please show me where are the tablet apps out there that can compare with the iPad apps currently in existence. KTHNKSBYE.

Quote:
It also doesn't mention that the battery is the same size as the iPad 2's and is rated at 10 hours for video like the iPad 2

They rated it at 10 hours. Time will tell. They also did not mention flash. Curious, innit? I wonder how is the battery drain with flash. I still have hopes they can pull a "flash without battery drain" stunt, but how I doubt that.

Quote:
..., and it has a superior screen to the iPad 2. If anything, the screen is the highlight. It's the world's first PLS screen in consumer electronics, which is the evolutionary success to the IPS screen in the iPads. PLS screens are 15% cheaper, 10% brighter, and have better viewing angles.

... And perhaps they are still built in small numbers? Which makes me wonder how many of these are Samsung predicting to sell...

Quote:
MacRumors reported in February that Apple wanted to use the PLS panel in the iPad 2, but they ultimately didn't. Samsung holds 30 patents on the screen so it is the world's only manufacturer.

Good luck for them.
post #13 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

As of now, it's vaporware.

I saw a dumb video on engadget and they were showing both tablets, but they couldn't even be powered on. What's the use of showing a video of two blank screens with nothing on them?

The HW itself is running, just in the old chassis. They haven't had time to get any new HW back from the factory in the new chassis because, well, they probably just finished the design last week given the timeline.
post #14 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherian View Post

The HW itself is running, just in the old chassis. They haven't had time to get any new HW back from the factory in the new chassis because, well, they probably just finished the design last week given the timeline.

Yes, they did show the OS running in the old chassis.

The new tablet might be thinner, but it's also larger than the first version was, according to the dimensions.
post #15 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Psych_guy View Post

Wow, that didn't take long. I mean to turn this into another childish DED bashing thread.

It wouldn't happen if DED didn't warp the facts so much that he verges on political al spin. He fails to mention both samsungs are 2mm thinner than the ipad 2. It was only 2 weeks ago that everyone was raving that nobody could unveil a tablet as thin as the ipad. Samsung have just gone and beat it.

No doubt DED would have mentioned it if the ipad was 2mm thinner
post #16 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullhead View Post

I do not get how Samsung thinks it can compete head to head with the iPad. The only hope Samsung has at sellling these things is to significantly undercut the iPads price. If this thing was selling for $299 it might have a chance, but matching the price of the iPad for a cloner makes no sense. No one in their right mind would buy the cloner if you can get the real thing for the same price.

Time will tell. 299 would be ridiculous. You'd still have a point with a 399 price mark.


Even still, I think they will sell quite well at that price point. Google is not Microsoft, it has a good brand among youngsters. They will be able to talk up about flash, about chrome (a better browser, IMHO), about... well that's about it. Apple will show off their apps ecosystem... and thats' about it.

Apple will obviously sell more than Samsung, but this competition is getting better. It's no where near the debacle of the Xoom.
post #17 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuisDias View Post

Please show me where are the tablet apps out there that can compare with the iPad apps currently in existence. KTHNKSBYE.

"KTHNKSBYE"? The kind of maturity one should expect here, I guess.

Obviously Honeycomb doesn't have the iPad app selection right now. Obviously it will rapidly get many applications, just as Android has.

If you need a large selection of apps today, then obviously the iPad is the right tablet for you. Personally, I rarely use any apps on my iPhone 3GS aside from Facebook, Twitter, and Bloomberg so apps aren't a big deal to me. All of the apps I want to use are there already or will be soon.

I'm most interested in the web browsing and email experience. If you want the silly apps and games, then the iPad is the way to go.

Quote:
They rated it at 10 hours. Time will tell. They also did not mention flash. Curious, innit? I wonder how is the battery drain with flash. I still have hopes they can pull a "flash without battery drain" stunt, but how I doubt that.

Flash is GPU accelerated in honeycomb. Regardless, if you don't want Flash, turn it off. I would ask you how long the iPad's battery life is with Flash, but that would be trolling.

Flash is still very useful. I was out condo shopping last weekend with my iPhone and was checking out competing condo sites, some of which are Flash-based websites. Staring at a giant empty box is infuriating to me. Give me the choice if I'd like to use Flash, even if it would hurt my battery.
post #18 of 140
And, again, who, exactly, is going to write GarageBand quality apps for these Android tablets? Not Samsung, clearly. Not Google. Are independent developers supposed to pour millions of dollars of development costs into super polished productivity apps, for a market that seems more interested in widgets and Google services?

I find it extremely ironic that the iPad was initially greeted with shouts of "big iPod Touch" and "what is it for, exactly?", and now that Apple is pushing the software towards desktop class applications I'm supposed to shift my focus to specs.

If tablets are truly going to become the next mainstream computing platform, they're going to have to more than be email, media consumption, and twitter/text clients, but now that Android has competitive hardware serves as nothing more than that, I guess that's plenty.

It will be very interesting to see how the application scene plays out over the next year-- and yes, I said "application" not "app", because that speaks to what's happening on the iPad. Apple clearly intends this platform to supersede OS X, and to do so it will need to do everything that OS can do and more.

Does Google have similar ambitions for Android? Do Android devs have any real insentive to do the heavy lifting to create vastly more functionality? Or are hooks to ad services always going to be enough?
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post #19 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjw View Post

It wouldn't happen if DED didn't warp the facts so much that he verges on political al spin. He fails to mention both samsungs are 2mm thinner than the ipad 2. It was only 2 weeks ago that everyone was raving that nobody could unveil a tablet as thin as the ipad. Samsung have just gone and beat it.

No doubt DED would have mentioned it if the ipad was 2mm thinner

2mm is ridiculous. This is no inverted-wang contest. The diminishing of the thickness is important, but when you get down to such low differences, it's irrelevant. Mind you, Samsung was initially stunned by the iPad's thinness, and talked about redesigning their own tablets. This has probably cost them one month.

Anyways, it's still apple calling the shots. The others are still running behind, despite the fact that Samsung builds many iPad's parts!
post #20 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

And, again, who, exactly, is going to write GarageBand quality apps for these Android tablets? Not Samsung, clearly. Not Google. Are independent developers supposed to pour millions of dollars of development costs into super polished productivity apps, for a market that seems more interested in widgets and Google services?

The people who want apps like GarageBand are already buying iPads. Frankly, I still don't see the allure to those types of apps.

From what I can see, the iPad will get people who like games and kind of silly apps like Garage Band, the Tab/Xoom will go for the web/email crowd. Which is a perfectly valid business model.

I can't say I'm losing any sleep wondering who will write Garage Band for Android... iPad users seemed to get along just fine without it until a couple weeks ago, too.

FWIW, I am an independent developer and I've got my eye towards Android right now. Anyone who has gone to a recent mobile dev conference will see that's where the attention is right now. And for good reason, just look at the marketshare and trends.
post #21 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherian View Post

"
If you need a large selection of apps today, then obviously the iPad is the right tablet for you. Personally, I rarely use any apps on my iPhone 3GS aside from Facebook, Twitter, and Bloomberg so apps aren't a big deal to me. All of the apps I want to use are there already or will be soon.

I'm most interested in the web browsing and email experience. If you want the silly apps and games, then the iPad is the way to go.

Sure, but at some point this becomes untenable. You're actually endorsing the "big phone" theory of tablets, whereas the smart money is on tablets supplanting laptops for a lot of people.

So does that mean everyone just stops doing anything but surf the web and exchange emails? If so, what's the advantage of cool "multitasking"? Not much tasking going on at all, as far as I can see.

More apps will come for Honeycomb, but what sort? More Twitter clients? More web services repackaged as apps?

It would be pretty funny if the iPad became the "productivity, when you want to do real work" tablet and Android became the "whatever, just want to look at the web" device.
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post #22 of 140
I actually applaud samsung's efforts it takes alot for a company to say "look what we got just isnt going to cut it" and then go back to the drawing board and start from square one. How the product actually turns out could be a different story, but judging from the specs it should be a fairly awesome tablet. We cant judge what we dont know so until then we will have to wait.
post #23 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Sure, but at some point this becomes untenable. You're actually endorsing the "big phone" theory of tablets, whereas the smart money is on tablets supplanting laptops for a lot of people.

So does that mean everyone just stops doing anything but surf the web and exchange emails? If so, what's the advantage of cool "multitasking"? Not much tasking going on at all, as far as I can see.

More apps will come for Honeycomb, but what sort? More Twitter clients? More web services repackaged as apps?

It would be pretty funny if the iPad became the "productivity, when you want to do real work" tablet and Android became the "whatever, just want to look at the web" device.

If there's demand, the apps will come. If there's no demand, they won't. The market will work itself out. All of the arguments focusing on the app selection a couple months after a product launches are desperate and pretty silly.

As for tablets supplanting laptops -- I'm not sure the argument is in iOS's favour here. Honeycomb is inarguably a far better laptop replacement than iOS is with its much saner notification system and multitasking implementation. Not to mention support for Flash (like it or not, still important to most people) and ability to get apps from outside a walled garden. The iPad is firmly planeted in the "supplemental device" category until it can mature its UI.
post #24 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherian View Post

The people who want apps like GarageBand are already buying iPads. Frankly, I still don't see the allure to those types of apps.

From what I can see, the iPad will get people who like games and kind of silly apps like Garage Band, the Tab/Xoom will go for the web/email crowd. Which is a perfectly valid business model.

I can't say I'm losing any sleep wondering who will write Garage Band for Android... iPad users seemed to get along just fine without it until a couple weeks ago, too.

FWIW, I am an independent developer and I've got my eye towards Android right now. Anyone who has gone to a recent mobile dev conference will see that's where the attention is right now. And for good reason, just look at the marketshare and trends.

So GarageBand is "kind of silly"? I don't think legions of musicians will fell that way. What else is kind of silly? Keynote? Pages? iMovie?

You're basically dismissing computing as we've known it just to support the reality of Android as it currently exists for tablets. I'm wondering how many people will share your desire for an expensive web client when they can have that and a great deal more for the same price.
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post #25 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherian View Post

"KTHNKSBYE"? The kind of maturity one should expect here, I guess.

Obviously Honeycomb doesn't have the iPad app selection right now. Obviously it will rapidly get many applications, just as Android has.

No it won't. iPad will still largely beat android's tablets this year, if Apple doesn't commit major mistakes in their distributive channells. And given the different market styles, where piracy is rampant on android, developers are probably 10 times more eager to join the app store than the google store.

So albeit the great app bubble in android store will come about, it will still be quite inferior to apple's in 2011.

Quote:
If you need a large selection of apps today, then obviously the iPad is the right tablet for you. Personally, I rarely use any apps on my iPhone 3GS aside from Facebook, Twitter, and Bloomberg so apps aren't a big deal to me. All of the apps I want to use are there already or will be soon.

This is irrelevant, I wasn't speaking as if apps are everyone's "killer app". I mentioned it as an important feature for many other people. You know, consumers.

Quote:
I'm most interested in the web browsing and email experience. If you want the silly apps and games, then the iPad is the way to go.

Because the internetz is seriouzz, and the apps are sillly. And I'm the immature? Puh lease.


Quote:
Flash is GPU accelerated in honeycomb. Regardless, if you don't want Flash, turn it off. I would ask you how long the iPad's battery life is with Flash, but that would be trolling.

Yes it would be. And correction, flash is *going* to be accelerated in honeycomb.

Quote:
Flash is still very useful. I was out condo shopping last weekend with my iPhone and was checking out competing condo sites, some of which are Flash-based websites. Staring at a giant empty box is infuriating to me. Give me the choice if I'd like to use Flash, even if it would hurt my battery.

I might agree with you on this.
post #26 of 140
Somebody's got a bad case of iPad envy... and it's Samsung

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #27 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

So GarageBand is "kind of silly"? I don't think legions of musicians will fell that way. What else is kind of silly? Keynote? Pages? iMovie?

In my opinion, yes. I've never seen anyone use Keynote to do a presentation on an iPad/iPhone, and we have a LOT of iPads/iPhones around the office. Ditto for pages.

iMovie and GarageBand may be useful to some people, but they are undeniably silly. No serious musicians use GarageBand, no serious filmmakers use iMovie. They're for toying around.

Quote:
You're basically dismissing computing as we've known it just to support the reality of Android as it currently exists for tablets.

A bit of a hyperbole, don't you think?

I'm not saying apps aren't important, just that they aren't the be-all, end-all for most people. The iPhone went a whole year without them and still everyone wanted one. The apps will come, they just don't appear overnight. My position is that the people buying Tabs/Xooms are people who don't care much for the volume of apps in the iTunes store. That's all. In a year from now, there will be a tremendous amount of Android tablet apps.
post #28 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherian View Post

If there's demand, the apps will come. If there's no demand, there's not. The market will work itself out.

As for tablets supplanting laptops -- I'm not sure the argument is in iOS's favour here. Honeycomb is inarguably a far better laptop replacement than iOS is with its much saner notification system and multitasking implementation. Not to mention support for Flash (like it or not, still important to most people) and ability to get apps from outside a walled garden.

Bizarre. You're actually championing the mechanics of the OS over what you can do with it. This seems to be a trend in Android circles-- using and Android is its own reward, as you admire your widgets and notifications. Apps? Pffft. Whatever. As long as I've got a browser.
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post #29 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuisDias View Post

No it won't. iPad will still largely beat android's tablets this year, if Apple doesn't commit major mistakes in their distributive channells. And given the different market styles, where piracy is rampant on android, developers are probably 10 times more eager to join the app store than the google store.

So albeit the great app bubble in android store will come about, it will still be quite inferior to apple's in 2011.

Probably. as I said, if you want the apps today, go for the iPad. It's a no-brainer. I find Honeycomb's UI for web browsing far more appealing to me than iPad's array of apps. That's my personal preference.

Quote:
Because the internetz is seriouzz, and the apps are sillly. And I'm the immature? Puh lease.

Take a look at the top 100 free apps and tell me "silly" is not a good word.

Quote:
Yes it would be. And correction, flash is *going* to be accelerated in honeycomb.

It already is. We've got 10.2 beta running on a Xoom in the office. It's far faster than you seem to think, and I haven't seen a noticeable battery hit. For all I know it may only last 7 hours of heavy flash browsing instead of 10 for the vanilla web, but I'm not concerned.

Quote:
I might agree with you on this.

I'm glad. It's never bad to give people choice.
post #30 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherian View Post

The people who want apps like GarageBand are already buying iPads. Frankly, I still don't see the allure to those types of apps.

There are people who really enjoy yellow. We just have to accept them as part of mankind I guess...

Quote:
From what I can see, the iPad will get people who like games and kind of silly apps like Garage Band, the Tab/Xoom will go for the web/email crowd. Which is a perfectly valid business model.

Yes, this is obviously true, except for the small minor detail of conflating the entire iPad's app marketplace as "games and gargebndsmth". Paraphrasing you, I could troll you and tell you that the only apps that android has is wallpapaerrz which in reality are just trojan horses... funnily enough, I wouldn't be too far from the truth.

Quote:
I can't say I'm losing any sleep wondering who will write Garage Band for Android... iPad users seemed to get along just fine without it until a couple weeks ago, too.

Fortunately, the future market demands do not satisfy themselves to the perceived needs of the past, for that would have meant the death of capitalism 70 years ago.

Quote:
FWIW, I am an independent developer and I've got my eye towards Android right now. Anyone who has gone to a recent mobile dev conference will see that's where the attention is right now. And for good reason, just look at the marketshare and trends.

Good luck for you. I think you are *wildly* mistaken, but if you aren't a google paid hack or a blind apologist, and a serious thinking person that reached said conclusion, well then have a shot at it. At least you are betting and working for something.

You could still try to dev for both platforms, since it's quite obvious where the market is right now.
post #31 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Bizarre. You're actually championing the mechanics of the OS over what you can do with it. This seems to be a trend in Android circles-- using and Android is its own reward, as you admire your widgets and notifications. Apps? Pffft. Whatever. As long as I've got a browser.

Web Apps are coming. Be prepared.

The mechanics of the OS fundamentally affect how you use the device. The reason iPhones are way better than Symbian phones is because the "mechanics of the OS" are far better.

You're right in that people who use Android phones are probably less interested in apps. And what's wrong with that? People can use their device as they want. I've little to no interest in apps because I'm surrounded by powerful computers all the time which do most of those things better. I'm not impressed by the novelty of multitouch because I've worked with it for years on a large scale. Apps just aren't my thing, except for a couple notable ones.
post #32 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherian View Post

In my opinion, yes. I've never seen anyone use Keynote to do a presentation on an iPad/iPhone, and we have a LOT of iPads/iPhones around the office. Ditto for pages.

There hasn't been a great way to move media off the iPad onto projector/monitors till now. We're talking about what the future holds. If tablets supplant laptops, do you reckon people will just stop doing presentations?

Quote:
iMovie and GarageBand may be useful to some people, but they are undeniably silly. No serious musicians use GarageBand, no serious filmmakers use iMovie. They're for toying around.

You've obviously never worked with the new GarageBand. And how is something better than nothing? Thank God my Android tablet isn't infested with all those apps that have somewhat less functionality than what I imagine optimal!


Quote:
A bit of a hyperbole, don't you think?

I'm not saying apps aren't important, just that they aren't the be-all, end-all for most people. The iPhone went a whole year without them and still everyone wanted one. The apps will come, they just don't appear overnight. My position is that the people buying Tabs/Xooms are people who don't care much for the volume of apps in the iTunes store. That's all. In a year from now, there will be a tremendous amount of Android tablet apps.

Of course they are. Applications are what allow you to do things with your computer. We're not talking about the dawn of multitouch computing anymore, as when the iPhone was released. We're talking about moving into the next phase of personal computing.

When GUIs supplanted text based interfaces, did anyone argue that being able to move icons around on the screen was plenty cool enough, thank you, and actually doing things wasn't really necessary? How much functionality are you willing to jettison, just because Android can't do it? And why?
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #33 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuisDias View Post

Good luck for you. I think you are *wildly* mistaken, but if you aren't a google paid hack or a blind apologist, and a serious thinking person that reached said conclusion, well then have a shot at it. At least you are betting and working for something.

You could still try to dev for both platforms, since it's quite obvious where the market is right now.

Right now, the going rate for Android apps is about 50% higher than iPhone app development. It's not a bad bet.

Why is that? It's simple:
1) There is a far larger pool of existing iOS developers. Supply/demand.
2) The iOS app market is far more saturated, there's less opportunity and harder to break an app in ans get it popular with so much existing competition and entrenched applications
3) Many companies and apps already exist on the iPhone, but they were caught off guard by the explosion in Android popularity and want an Android app yesterday and will pay a premium for it.
post #34 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

There hasn't been a great way to move media off the iPad onto projector/monitors till now. We're talking about what the future holds. If tablets supplant laptops, do you reckon people will just stop doing presentations?

If we're talking about a hypothetical future, then why do you only look at Android in the present?

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You've obviously never worked with the new GarageBand. And how is something better than nothing? Thank God my Android tablet isn't infested with all those apps that have somewhat less functionality than what I imagine optimal!

This is a strawman. I'd be thrilled if Android had as many apps as the iOS store does. I just personally don't care, and I'm explaining it has little appeal for me and many other people I know.


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Of course they are. Applications are what allow you to do things with your computer. We're not talking about the dawn of multitouch computing anymore, as when the iPhone was released. We're talking about moving into the next phase of personal computing.

Speaking from experience, the next phase of personal computing is not native apps on embedded devices. It's on the cloud and web apps. Apple knows it, too. In fact, they thought we'd be ready for it before we actually were (the original iPhone was all about web apps). Google especially knows it.

Native apps will never go away, but their importance is rapidly diminishing. The New York Time's webapp is way, way better than its iPad app IMO.

Quote:
When GUIs supplanted text based interfaces, did anyone argue that being able to move icons around on the screen was plenty cool enough, thank you, and actually doing things wasn't really necessary? How much functionality are you willing to jettison, just because Android can't do it? And why?

Who is jettisoning anything? I'm not saying Android doesn't need apps. I'm saying I don't need all those apps. My use case is probably different than yours. I own all three gaming consoles and a powerful gaming computer, iPad gaming holds no interest to me. The vast majority of apps I've ever downloaded I use briefly then just leave on my phone with a pretty icon. I've had an iPhone for two years, and I've discovered I'm not an app guy.
post #35 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherian View Post

Take a look at the top 100 free apps and tell me "silly" is not a good word.

It's not. Period. And even if it were, of if we are redefining "silliness" for the sake of argument, then I'd say that "non-silliness" is way overrated.

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It already is. We've got 10.2 beta running on a Xoom in the office. It's far faster than you seem to think, and I haven't seen a noticeable battery hit.

Flash 10.2 beta is not fully hardware accelerated for the Xoom. Many reviews still call it sub-par.

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For all I know it may only last 7 hours of heavy flash browsing instead of 10 for the vanilla web, but I'm not concerned.

Good for you.

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I'm glad. It's never bad to give people choice.

Never said the opposite.
post #36 of 140
so lemme see ...

the POS 7" Galaxy tab that Samsung shipped 2.1 million of late last year - and can't be upgraded to Honeycomb - is still for sale? with probably well over a million sitting unsold in warehouses?

and the not-as-advanced "Galaxy 10.1" tab that Samsung announced in February is - or is not - going on sale soon anyway?

http://www.engadget.com/2011/02/13/s...mb-dual-camer/

while this newer version Galaxy 10.1 tab is going on sale "this summer" on top of that? June or September?

so - who is not going to wait for the next one? which means no one will buy the two prior models that are now destined for the discount bin.

way to go, Samsung!
post #37 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherian View Post

Web Apps are coming. Be prepared.

Shit, I've been hearing this since 2004.
post #38 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuisDias View Post

It's not. Period. And even if it were, of if we are redefining "silliness" for the sake of argument, then I'd say that "non-silliness" is way overrated.

It's clearly a personal judgement.

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Flash 10.2 beta is not fully hardware accelerated for the Xoom. Many reviews still call it sub-par.

I'm willing to bet you're not qualified to speak to the implementation of Flash 10.2. It is HW accelerated. Whether it fully plays nicely with the plugin container for the Android 3.0 browser is another matter, and that's why it's still beta.

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Never said the opposite.

It was certainly implied by your contempt for the presence of Flash on Honeycomb. Why else would you be so up in arms about it?
post #39 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuisDias View Post

Shit, I've been hearing this since 2004.

Technology did not exist in 2004. It does now. Listen to Apple -- HTML5 is ridiculously powerful. You can even do full out 3D.
post #40 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asherian View Post

Right now, the going rate for Android apps is about 50% higher than iPhone app development. It's not a bad bet.

Why is that? It's simple:
1) There is a far larger pool of existing iOS developers. Supply/demand.
2) The iOS app market is far more saturated, there's less opportunity and harder to break an app in ans get it popular with so much existing competition and entrenched applications
3) Many companies and apps already exist on the iPhone, but they were caught off guard by the explosion in Android popularity and want an Android app yesterday and will pay a premium for it.

Can be true. The maths, I have them not.
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