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Dell, HP execs lash out at Apple's iOS successes - Page 5

post #161 of 233
This tool is Dell's global head of marketing?
Until they have people lining up each morning to buy a Dell product, they shouldn't really be trashing Apple's strategy.
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post #162 of 233
Puke in Michael Dell's mouth!
post #163 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by RKpro View Post

This tool is Dell's global head of marketing?
Until they have people lining up each morning to buy a Dell product, they shouldn't really be trashing Apple's strategy.

Is the guy who did the Godfathers Pizza commercials still alive? They wouldn't need to change their copy evenThat scowling face and: "You're gettin' a Dell!" (Or Else!)
post #164 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

Notice that while the execs made some comments -- which we may not agree with -- what I find amusing that the Appleinsider folks characterize it as 'lashing out'. The execs didn't 'lash out'. They did make critical remarks about their competitor, but heck...Steve Jobs does that all the time, too. He claimed that the 7" tablets like the Galaxy Tab needed to come with sandpaper to sand your fingers down.

It's all the same. It's business. Of course HP and Dell execs can't praise Apple. Neither can Apple praise their competition.

There's definitely some truth in that, but you have to admit that you wont hear Steve Jobs make comments that are *this* absurd and obviously untrue. Sure enough Steve likes to spin his competitors faults where possible and make a caricature out of them (such as "7 inch is DOA" and "you'll have to offer sanding paper with them so people can sand down their fingertips to use them"), but at least he's not pulling made-up prices out of thin air, mentioning accessory devices that are completely opposite to the idea of a touchscreen tablet, talk about 'open platforms' and 'offering Windows tablets' at the same time, and, last but not least: predicting the failure of a device that sells faster than they can get built, is cheaper than anything that tries to compete with it, while at the same time, not having *any* product whatsoever for sale.

Apple is smug too, but at least they are only smug when they have an actual product to be smug about, and they don't make PR blunders this big by making random stuff up along the way.

These exec comments, if they are actually quoted correctly and not pulled out of context (which I can hadly believe), are an instant classic.
post #165 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

Notice that while the execs made some comments -- which we may not agree with -- what I find amusing that the Appleinsider folks characterize it as 'lashing out'. The execs didn't 'lash out'. They did make critical remarks about their competitor, but heck...Steve Jobs does that all the time, too. He claimed that the 7" tablets like the Galaxy Tab needed to come with sandpaper to sand your fingers down.

It's all the same. It's business. Of course HP and Dell execs can't praise Apple. Neither can Apple praise their competition.

Jobs's comments were smart and had some truth to them. These comments are absurd. More importantly, Jobs waits until he has a shipping product before declaring victory. Doing so before you've shipped anything does, indeed, look like reactionary 'lashing out.' And neither of these companies have an iPad competitor on the market.
post #166 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

The usual saying is something like "don't attribute to malice what is simply ignorance," but in this case most of the commenters here have it backwards: Dell and HP do not believe what they are saying, they are consciously sowing the seeds of "fear, uncertainty, and doubt" (FUD). Enterprise buyers (executives who make purchasing decisions for thousands, even hundreds of thousands of employees) tend to be very risk-averse and very susceptible to arguments like these. Dell, HP, and Microsoft have a long history of pitching their products to these decision makers. They know this "closed system" argument is BS, but they also know that it's the kind of thing that makes corporate buyers very nervous. The old saying was "no one ever got fired for buying IBM" then it changed to Microsoft being the safe choice. These guys are just doing what they can to increase the chance that businesses will think that outfitting their staff with Apple stuff is a risky decision.

I will not be at all surprised to witness the following exchange at my company: CEO: "Hey IT what would it take to give everyone an iPad? Do you think that would make them more productive?" IT: "I understand where you coming from, but it's not clear that the iPad is the right solution. It's a closed platform and doesn't have enterprise support. Dell will be coming out with the product for us shortly." In the meantime, an increasing number of executives (and managers, etc.) are going around IT and buying their own iPhones and iPads.

Well that made sense until I found out your argument more or less hinges on the idea that businesses want to have 'open systems' and telling them the iPad is a 'closed system' will rather make them buy a (currently non-existant) Dell tablet.

Businesses are not interested in open systems at all, except when they really have no choice, such as for specialist technical jobs that need Unix software or services that have Linux implementations. In fact the bigger the business, the more likely it will want to standardize on something that's as closed, proprietary and expensive as possible, as long they can get long-term support contracts on them, and get as much stuff they can get from a single vendor. This has actually been one of the pillars of Dells strategy for years: sell the same laptops you sell to consumers, but in a different case, and with a different (enterprisey) name, for double the money. Slap a 'Pro'-version of Windows on it instead of the 'Home' version you sell to consumers, sign a 5-year contract that makes it attractive for businesses to upgrade from Dell to Dell all the time, then sit back and rake in the money. My company is the perfect example for this, they pay (this is not a joke) $2500 for 'fully decked' Dell Precision laptops, that have the same specs and build quality of their equivalent consumer laptops, which sell for $800.

Businesses don't care about 'open', they care about 'long term support', 'enterprise features', 'standardization', 'single vendors', and all that kind of enterprise bullshit that sounds very important but in practice is just a red herring (try actually getting support from Microsoft if your a small shop, even if you paid good money for it, for example). If big businesses can get a rock-solid Linux-Apache-PHP-MySQL server, fully configured, installed and supported by a professional supplier, for $2500, but the same machine with ISS, ASP, .Net, MSSQL for $25,000, they will actually go for the Microsoft solution, just because its from a 'real vendor' and not made by open-source hippies, it is 'enterprise class', and if it's so expensive, it must be insanely good, right?

So while you are right about Dell and HP trying to downplay iPads as 'toys' and touting their own 'enterprise' solutions, you are very wrong about the 'open' vs 'closed' thing. For large businesses, 'open' is a negative, not a positive.

It's kind of staggering to see that this Dell exec seems to have forgotten what Dell's business model is based on, by playing the 'open' vs. 'closed' card. It makes these comments even more absurd.
post #167 of 233
Sorry I'm late to the party, but it is still early out here in California.

Although Lark is completely clueless he might end up being right about one thing, but only accidentally right, not for any of the reasons he stated.

Apple may end up being just another tablet maker and not necessarily the dominate player it is today. Apple has been promoting open standards for websites and only supports those standards on their tablets. In the long run, everyone else will fall into line as well once the webM H265 issue gets sorted. It is rather like Henry Ford inventing the movable assembly line. It put Ford way out in front for many years but eventually all manufacturers adopted the model and it was no longer an advantage for Ford. It was also many years after the invention of the automobile that we finally got the steering wheel and pedal configuration that are now standard.

Apple has paved the way in tablets but eventually there will be other worthy competitors. I only hope that the standards based business model will prevail.

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post #168 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

Well that made sense until I found out your argument more or less hinges on the idea that businesses want to have 'open systems' and telling them the iPad is a 'closed system' will rather make them buy a (currently non-existant) Dell tablet.

Businesses are not interested in open systems at all, except when they really have no choice, such as for specialist technical jobs that need Unix software or services that have Linux implementations. In fact the bigger the business, the more likely it will want to standardize on something that's as closed, proprietary and expensive as possible, as long they can get long-term support contracts on them, and get as much stuff they can get from a single vendor. This has actually been one of the pillars of Dells strategy for years: sell the same laptops you sell to consumers, but in a different case, and with a different (enterprisey) name, for double the money. Slap a 'Pro'-version of Windows on it instead of the 'Home' version you sell to consumers, sign a 5-year contract that makes it attractive for businesses to upgrade from Dell to Dell all the time, then sit back and rake in the money. My company is the perfect example for this, they pay (this is not a joke) $2500 for 'fully decked' Dell Precision laptops, that have the same specs and build quality of their equivalent consumer laptops, which sell for $800.

Businesses don't care about 'open', they care about 'long term support', 'enterprise features', 'standardization', 'single vendors', and all that kind of enterprise bullshit that sounds very important but in practice is just a red herring (try actually getting support from Microsoft if your a small shop, even if you paid good money for it, for example). If big businesses can get a rock-solid Linux-Apache-PHP-MySQL server, fully configured, installed and supported by a professional supplier, for $2500, but the same machine with ISS, ASP, .Net, MSSQL for $25,000, they will actually go for the Microsoft solution, just because its from a 'real vendor' and not made by open-source hippies, it is 'enterprise class', and if it's so expensive, it must be insanely good, right?

So while you are right about Dell and HP trying to downplay iPads as 'toys' and touting their own 'enterprise' solutions, you are very wrong about the 'open' vs 'closed' thing. For large businesses, 'open' is a negative, not a positive.

It's kind of staggering to see that this Dell exec seems to have forgotten what Dell's business model is based on, by playing the 'open' vs. 'closed' card. It makes these comments even more absurd.

I guess "Enterprise" (F***ing God, how I despise that term!) is the new medicine. I remember in my early days in electronics, you could take an $89 Eico oscilloscope, put a new faceplate on it, and the medical market would pay $400 without batting an eye. Barnum's Law in action.
post #169 of 233
HP is a danger but Dell has no record of success in this area whatsoever. They are just slagging off the iPad in the hope people will buy their PCs instead.
post #170 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stashman View Post

Basically, Andy Lark is a Fucktard. Even my dog knows you don't need a mouse for an iPad.

OMG! I literally LMAO....thanks Stashman! (oh...and I whole-heartedly agree!!)
post #171 of 233
Half the comments here make good fun of Lark's remarks, and the other half actually wastes time demonstrating why his remarks actually make no sense...

If you really think he's that stupid or incompetent, you may be wrong. He knows exactly what he's doing and saying, and regardless how outlandish/retarded his claims are, only people that KNOW a minimum about tablets will laugh at him. The fact is despite the iPad's success, and a great success it is for a product line that didn't exist a year ago, it is still a confidential market. The tablet phenom is starting to really snowball now, and the vast majority of people aren't savvy enough yet to make out facts from pure BS.

He's throwing mud at the iPad and regardless how WE laugh at him, SOME people will give credit to his nonsense..

So I for one am not amused, I infuriates me to see those shameful tactics against a close to stellar product.
post #172 of 233
Actually a few years ago HP bought Indigo from an Israeli company. They are not just a over price ink company anymore. They are an over priced designed to fail digital printer company also.
Check out what $500K will buy you these days!!!
post #173 of 233
I have owned computers from all 3 sources.

HP: The worst machines I've used. I have had two of them (one personal, one at work), and both were troublesome right from the start. It was 10 years ago, so I hope they've improved.

Dell: I have had 3 at work, and 4 in the family. All have been pretty reliable. Most problems were with Windows, not the machines.

Apple: Bliss! We have been using Apple computers consistently since 1981 in my home.
OK, admitting not perfect, but most reliable hardware of the group, and by far the best OS to deal with. After a day at work on XP, it is very pleasant to use my Mac at home.

Dell has been trying to compete with Apple's non-computer products for the past decade, and failed in every case. I doubt Steve is even paying much attention to them. For tablets, they are just another Droid. Nothing special. At least Apple doesn't have to compete with anyone else with iOS devices. Dell must not only convince people that Android is the better solution, but that Dell has something special to offer. That certainly won't be the tablets they offer, but they do have good working business channels. Selling to their business partners is likely the only path they can hope for here.

WebOS could be interesting, and I hope it gets a foothold. I highly doubt it will achieve the success of iOS, but competition is always a good thing.
post #174 of 233
Maybe in addition to his mouse and keyboard he has connected to his iPad he also has a printer, dual screens, and a USB bendable mini-fan.
post #175 of 233
Micheal Dell can never seem not to run his mouth, Maybe he needs a dog snare. Dells are garbage anyways and I would never sell one to any of my customers anyways. HP should worry about their own legal problems rather than mingle off of Apple's secessful product line rather than down play it.



Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Executives from rival technology companies Dell and HP spoke out against Apple this week, with a Dell executive predicting that the iPad will fail, while an HP executive criticized Apple's relationships with its partners.

iPad fail?

Andy Lark, Dell's global head of marketing, told Lisa Banks of CIO Australia on Tuesday that Apple's iPad will eventually succumb to Dell's Android- and Windows-based tablets because of pressure from an open enterprise market.

Lark congratulated Apple for igniting the tablet opportunity with the iPad, while predicting that the device will ultimately fall to more "open" competitors. I couldnt be happier that Apple has created a market and built up enthusiasm but longer term, open, capable and affordable will win, not closed, high price and proprietary, Lark said. [Apple has] done a really nice job, theyve got a great product, but the challenge theyve got is that already Android is outpacing them.

"Apple is great if youve got a lot of money and live on an island. Its not so great if you have to exist in a diverse, open, connected enterprise; simple things become quite complex, Lark added.

According to Lark, the high cost of additional accessories for the iPad makes the tablet inaccessible. An iPad with a keyboard, a mouse and a case [means] youll be at $1500 or $1600; thats double of what youre paying," he said. "Thats not feasible.

Lark's figures, however, are confusing, as it is unlikely that a keyboard, mouse and case would cost the same as an iPad. For instance, purchasing Apple's leather Smart Cover, BlueTooth keyboard and Magic Mouse would cost just $207.

The executive went on to indicate that Dell's long-term approach to tablets relies heavily on enterprise adoption. "Weve taken a very considered approach to tablets, given that the vast majority of our business isnt in the consumer space, he said.

However, Dell is hedging its bets when it comes to tablet operating systems. Our strategy is multi-OS," Lark said. "We will do Windows 7 coupled with Android Honeycomb, and were really excited. We think that giving people that choice is very important.

The PC maker has struggled to gain a foothold with its 5-inch Dell Streak 'tweener' smartphone and tablet. In December, Journalist Walt Mossberg called out the device as last year's worst-reviewed product.

Dell has begun showing off a 10-inch tablet that will compete with the iPad later this year.



HP focus

Promoting the future of its webOS, Stephen DeWitt, senior vice president of HP's Americas Solution Partners, criticized Apple on Monday for its poor relationship with its partners.

"Apple's relationship with partners is transactional, completely. Apple doesnt have an inclusive philosophy of partner capabilities, and that's just absurd," DeWitt said in an interview with CRN's Kevin McLaughlin at HP's Americas Partner Conference in Las Vegas.

McLaughlin checked with several Apple and HP channel partners to test DeWitt's claims. "Unlike Apple, HP is very channel friendly. And if you have an issue with HP you can pick up the phone and talk to someone. That's something that's impossible with Apple. As an Apple partner, I can say that it really feels like they're holding you hostage sometimes," said one source from a solution provider.

Another source, however, was skeptical of HP's ability to compete against Apple and Google with webOS. "I don't hear much about webOS in the marketplace, and it's going to be tough to build a mobility practice around it," said one HP partner. "Apple and Android are the two established marketplaces out there. On the tablet side, why wouldn't you just get an iPad?"

HP has committed to an effectively all-in bet with webOS, a "prized asset" which the company acquired when it purchased Palm last year. Executives at HP, including former Palm CEO Jon Rubinstein, have indicated their plans to "double down" on the operating system.

Last month, HP unveiled a TouchPad tablet and a Pre 3 smartphone in an effort to catch up to Apple in the mobile space.

post #176 of 233
What does one mean when stating that Android is "open"? Seriously, to the end user, why should I care that something is "open"? What will that mean to me? I am never going to make changes to the source, recompile and reinstall my OS. What else does it mean? Are they simply talking about the marketplace? That apps can be sold without any level of validation or testing?

But seriously. I'm not joking. When the Android fans boast about their "open" system, what are they actually boasting about? I'm really not sure.
post #177 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

but longer term, open, capable and affordable will win, not closed, high price and proprietary

you know, just like with the iPod!
post #178 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post

What does one mean when stating that Android is "open"? Seriously, to the end user, why should I care that something is "open"? What will that mean to me? I am never going to make changes to the source, recompile and reinstall my OS. What else does it mean? Are they simply talking about the marketplace? That apps can be sold without any level of validation or testing?

But seriously. I'm not joking. When the Android fans boast about their "open" system, what are they actually boasting about? I'm really not sure.

Emphasis added.

That's exactly what the loudest Fandroids who want to piss in everybody else's cornflakes want to do, or fantasize about doing. It's just like in the days when Apple computers "didn't have enough expansion slots" even though every study showed that a totally negligible percentage of people ever expanded their computer before replacing it. It's all about fantasy. In their minds, since Stallman's Freerunner never transpired, this is the next best thingyou could rewrite and reinstall the OS, even though less than .001% of people ever would.
post #179 of 233
Both HP & Dell are copy cat companies whose efforts in the mobile space are nothing short of attempting to copy the path Apple is blazing and has left all competitors in it's dusty smoke screen!
post #180 of 233
WHAAAAAAaaaaa... WWWWHHAAAAAAaaaaaa... WWWHHHAAAaaaaaaa... Please call a whambulance..1!!

Talk about spitting up in your spilt milk..JJeeezzzz.. Kinda sounds like Craig Mundie over at Nokiasoft saying he thinks tablets are a passing fancy and will pass just like any other 'fad'.... Humm.. as they ALL watch TRILLIONS of dollars in sales steam by their windows...

Apple has worked very hard on this niche of technology and now that they're gaining ground and making boat loads of money for their investors, the rest of the tech mainstream is whining in their collective beers... TOUGH. How does it feel to be an almost me-too??
post #181 of 233
Well, I got my laugh for the day. By the way Andy Lark, how are those Dell Streak's selling?
post #182 of 233
Dell, anyone who works for Dell, anyone
Who owns a Dell, is a loser.
post #183 of 233
Was worth the shot.
post #184 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by s4agilbert View Post

Anyone else notice that the Dell exec mentioned having to get a mouse? Doesn't really get the whole touch screen tablet thing does he?


Agreed: He must be thinking about that large market where a person needs a mouse and keyboard with a tablet.

Duh Dell, if I needed all three, I'd get a portable.
post #185 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obi-Wan Kubrick View Post

Maybe in addition to his mouse and keyboard he has connected to his iPad he also has a printer, dual screens, and a USB bendable mini-fan.

You forgot the Floppy drive and the parallel port.
post #186 of 233
"Dell is great if youve got a lot of money and have an incompetent IT staff that doesn't know how to administer Linux"

Fixed that for you. Hey Andy have you priced one of your Windows servers lately? I will concede that Dell has some decent, fairly reliable hardware. But as soon as you tack on Windows Server--which is WAAAAYYYYYYY overpriced for what it is--it's very expensive. And the only reason that IT departments spend that kind of money on this overpriced hardware/software is because their IT staff is too retarded to figure out Linux/*nix. I know this first hand working as the senior web developer for a large corporation. I was confounded that I had as much IT knowledge in many areas than some of our senior IT staff. This is a great example. I requested that there be some sort of version control implemented in our unit. So I approached our IT VP and he told me that they had looked into ClearCase from IBM but we couldn't work the five figures it will take into our budget. I then said that a Linux comes with open source Subversion and I could install that on an old desktop we have lying around. His response was that they didn't know Linux and if I left the company they would have anyone to be able to administer it. Really?!?!? Most of the IT people that I've met are retarded and if there isn't a Windows snap-in wizard for whatever they are doing they can't figure it out. Dell, Microsoft, IBM, HP depend on these retarded people and specifically build solutions around keeping them retarded.

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post #187 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post


Now Dell, HP, Microsoft, Nokia have a problem. On principle, the CEOs and management of this companies will not use Apple products (see Bill Gates admission that he and his family are not allowed to use Apple products), so they really don't know what a quality product looks and feels like.

If I were these guys, I would be spending a lot of time playing with the iPad to understand why it's so popular (and because it's fun).

Of course, the interesting thing about the Gates admission that they are not allowed to use Apple products is the fact that this rule is only needed because they want to use Apple products. I doubt a similar ban on Coby products has been necessary.
post #188 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

Are you sure you didn't grab this from the Onion? I mean.. this is one of those pieces that's so over the top, it's not even worth commenting on. $1600 with accessories? A mouse? iPad will fail? I'm walking away before my head explodes.



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post #189 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by mknopp View Post

Guys, you need to give Mr. Lark ( ) a break.

The reason it cost him $1500-$1600 dollars was because he bought about a hundred different mice before the five year old down the street took pity on the poor fool ( ) and told him that the iPad doesn't need a mouse. I mean it took him at least a dozen mice before he figured out that the iPad didn't have a serial port.

THIS is a technology exec?

I figured it out. He was quoting the scalper price.
post #190 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

Apple is smug too, but at least they are only smug when they have an actual product to be smug about, and they don't make PR blunders this big by making random stuff up along the way.

I remember watching Jobs giving a product release maybe a year and a half ago. This was pre-iPad, and the launch included a new version of the iPod Touch, and touted its functionality as a great pocketable mini-computer. Then he put a picture up on the screen showing the backside of a guy in jeans with a Dell Mini 9 sticking out of his back pocket -- barely poking the corner in his back pocket. Everyone laughed. The idea was that this mini 9 just wasn't portable.

So what does Apple release within a year of that product launch? The iPad. With a 10" screen that is just as un-pocketable as that Dell Mini 9.

On top of that, Jobs makes fun of the 7" Galaxy Tab with the 'sand your fingers' comment. Well, how is it that iPhone and iPod Touch users use their miniscule machines then? If you have to sand your fingers down for a 7" Tab, what must you have to do to use an iPod Touch?!

The irony is amusing. Apple is just as good at poo-pooing everyone else -- whether it's actual-ware or vapor-ware.
post #191 of 233
Here's a number for you Mr. Lark. The stock price of your company has dropped by 50 percent over the last three years. The only people still long Dell must be the ones dumb enough to keep drinking your Kool-Aid.

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post #192 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmac View Post

I rarely use a keyboard but who, exactly, uses a mouse with a tablet? Has that Dell guy ever touched one?

Well exactly! The main reason everyone is going to this touch screen configuration is because you don't need other "stuff" to use it!!! That's what makes the iPad so great!

But... that's Dell for you... they just don't get it
post #193 of 233
Those who can escape the schoolyard do. Those who can't often pursue petty, mean spirited lives. Envy, scapegoating, dishonesty, and a psychotic need to "win" whatever the cost... these are the characteristics of injured children who no one noticed or understood until it was too late.

Sadly, those who surround themselves with money and sycophants are less likely to overcome such handicaps than others. Perhaps that's just a way of saying that the sickest of us often devote their lives to surrounding themselves with money and sycophants, but either way, once they're trapped in the plush dungeons they create for themselves and surrounded by fawning, cringing guards dressed as courtiers, they hardly ever get out. They spend their lives desperately trying to make more of something they fail to notice never satisfied them in the first place, and gradually go down in bitterness, often doing enormous harm to others along the way.

It's a pity they're too big to spank. They need some sort of catharsis, and a 9 figure salary with bonuses to match combined with stock options obviously doesn't do the trick.
post #194 of 233
Lark may be in lala land about the pricing, but I don't disagree with his comment about a mouse. iPhone and iPad are making huge inroads into the enterprise, and one of the uses there is to manage servers in a data center via remote desktop from iOS devices. Clicking tiny Windows UI elements with one's finger, such as the little expand/collapse + icons, is very difficult and you can easily mis-click on something you absolutely don't want to click on (like executing a database script before it's ready). Selecting several rows of text in an RDP session is also difficult (the native select feature in iOS doesn't work in a remote desktop session).

I definitely need a mouse to work with iOS devices, but currently Apple blocks it (you can pair Bluetooth keyboards, but not mice) -- presumably because it would work even more to negate the need to also own a full Mac. I would buy another iPad 2 right this second if it would support a Bluetooth mouse.

You can jailbreak the iOS devices to enable mouse support, but I do not want to do that.
post #195 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

These are CEOs. Management. They may be clueless but they are no different from most other management types. They are bean counters. They talk to other bean counters. They know quality only available to the super-rich: yachts, Lamborghinis, exclusive restaurants, mansions. For the most part, they have no knowledge of, and care less about the products they sell to their ultimate customers. Their customers are those in their supply chain, the volume purchasers, and distributors.

The rich man has his motor-car,
His country and his town estate.
He smokes a fifty-cent cigar
And jeers at Fate.

He frivols through the livelong day,
He knows not Poverty, her pinch.
His lot seems light, his heart seems gay;
He has a cinch.

Yet though my lamp burns low and dim,
Though I must slave for livelihood
Think you that I would change with him?
You bet I would!

-Franklin Pierce Adams-
-written in 1916-

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post #196 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmac View Post

I rarely use a keyboard but who, exactly, uses a mouse with a tablet? Has that Dell guy ever touched one?

Maybe he was referring to the Lap Mouse / Joystick

.
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post #197 of 233
Such ridiculous statements. It was because of Dell and Microsoft garbage I am now an Apple fanboy. It's because of 6 different HP piece of garbage printers all which broke in less than 2 cartridge cycles and endless conversations with a guy named Bob in India that I now own a Brother all in 1. I can't wait for Lion to come out so I can use the Windows Migrator to get the rest of my PC info into my new amazing MacBook Pro so I can boot the last bit of PC technology (tongue in cheeck) out of the house. It's a lock that Dell or HP garbage will NEVER cross my threshold again. I only wish Apple produced their own printers. Since my first MacBook that is still going strong we now have iPhones, Apple TV, Time Capsule (been working for 2+ years now), MacBook, MacBook Pro, iPad 1 (no mouse or keyboard haha), iPod mini, shuffle and all of them work synergistically without a hitch.
post #198 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnoble View Post

Andy Lark, a VP at Dell
Said the iPad can't possibly sell
With the cost of it's mouse
More than a house
It can't possibly sell very well

On the other hand look at our Streak
Its so small and impossibly sleek
With it's sales off the chart
Dell is doing it's part
To put Jobs out of a job, so to speak

This just in:*Andy Lark, head of global marketing, announces he is leaving Dell for a career in standup comedy. *"I seem to have a real talent for making people laugh" said Lark.

HaHaHa .... Great limerick .... luv it!

Re: Dell exec comments: This is what happens when a company, or a person for that matter, goes into "panic mode"! Logic flies out the window when your brain is in panic mode ... and when that happens, you make illogical/brainless choices ... with decisions or words. ... and trust me, the whole computer industry is in panic mode now. They are just starting to realize that Apple .... has a plan .... and it is not just "lucky' with it's choices .... and that plan is a great one. And since they don't know what the "plan" is .... they can only take a "guess and wait" approach. Ain't that lovely, now.

I am having such a great time being a "fanboy" nowadays ... just in anticipating what Apple's next move will be. The upcoming announcement of the data centre will be interesting, to be sure. I'm still not convinced it will be for Mobile Me in it's entirety .... the sheer size of the present one and of the possibility of expansion already being considered suggests to me that there is something else in the wind.

I know one thing, if I was a competitor of Apple today .... I would keep my mouth shut until I was "out of the panic mode" ... of course if they did that, all the headlines would read: All Is Quiet On The Western Front.
Apple, bigger than Google, ..... bigger than Microsoft,   The universe is unfolding as it should. Thanks, Apple.
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Apple, bigger than Google, ..... bigger than Microsoft,   The universe is unfolding as it should. Thanks, Apple.
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post #199 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post

What does one mean when stating that Android is "open"? Seriously, to the end user, why should I care that something is "open"? What will that mean to me? I am never going to make changes to the source, recompile and reinstall my OS. What else does it mean? Are they simply talking about the marketplace? That apps can be sold without any level of validation or testing?

But seriously. I'm not joking. When the Android fans boast about their "open" system, what are they actually boasting about? I'm really not sure.

I think what we tend to forget on these boards is that, for the most part, the average consumer could care less about what "makes their computer tick" .... they just want to enjoy what their device does.

In the same way that "some" people enjoy " tinkering with their car on the weekends" a lot of people who roam the websites about computers, in all likelihood, feel the same way about their computers. The truth is that the vast majority of consumers feel uncomfortable with the workings of their computers and "just want to get things done. The less people have to do "to make it work better" .... the more time they have to enjoy it .... and Apple is for the masses .... as their ever increasing sales would indicate.
Apple, bigger than Google, ..... bigger than Microsoft,   The universe is unfolding as it should. Thanks, Apple.
Reply
Apple, bigger than Google, ..... bigger than Microsoft,   The universe is unfolding as it should. Thanks, Apple.
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post #200 of 233
[QUOTE=AppleInsider;1838619]Executives from rival technology companies Dell and HP spoke out against Apple this week, with a Dell executive predicting that the iPad will fail, while an HP executive criticized Apple's relationships with its partners.

What a bunch of poor losers. Rather than being negative on Apple, they should try to create something unique in the tablet space. Instead they complain because they can't keep up with Apple's pace of development.

Apple does need effective competition in tablets, these losers obviously aren't gong to be that competition.
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