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Verizon iPhone most popular US mobile phone in February

post #1 of 51
Thread Starter 
Apple's CDMA iPhone sold by Verizon Wireless in the US was the nation's top mobile phone sold during the month of February, according to market research firm comScore.

The firm reported that of the top five phone makers, Apple grew its share of mobile subscribers the most in the last quarter, edging up 0.9 percentage points to hit a 7.5 percent share of the American mobile phone market (not just smartphones).

While four makers are ahead of Apple in the US mobile market, only first place Samsung was able to similarly increase its share of the market, by 0.3 percentage points, to 24.8 percent.

LG remained flat at 20.9 percent, while Motorola shrunk by 0.9 percentage points to a 16.1 percent share, and RIM fell by 0.2 points to achieve an 8.6 percent share of all mobiles sold during the three month period ending in February.

In terms of smartphone platforms, Android was up 7 percentage points to take 33 percent of the smartphone market, while Apple's iOS was the only other smartphone platform to register growth, up 0.2 points to a 25.2 percent share of smartphones.

RIM remained ahead of Apple, with 28.9 percent share, but was down 4.6 points compared to three months ago. Microsoft slipped another 1.3 points despite the release of Windows Phone 7, setting down to a 7.7 share, while HP's Palm webOS platform shrank by 1.1 points to take 2.8 percent share of the smartphone market.

The popularity of Apple's Verizon iPhone, which comScore called "the most acquired handset in the month of February," refutes anecdotal figures advertised by BTIG Research analyst Walter Piecyk, who recently claimed that Verizon was selling more HTC Thunderbolt phones than Apple iPhones, based on conversations with retail staff.

Verizon itself claimed the iPhone was its biggest phone launch ever, but has made no similar claim about the Android-based HTC Thunderbolt, which boasts 4G data service via Verizon's new LTE network.
post #2 of 51
Really?
You guys are still pushing this Verizon iPhone thing.
Get it guys, the war is over. AT&T has iPhone, now Verizon has it too.
The good news here is that iPhone outsold the so called phones of the 4G networks.
post #3 of 51
Good news or bad news - unless the numbers come from apple, it's just guessing.
post #4 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The popularity of Apple's Verizon iPhone, which comScore called "the most acquired handset in the month of February," refutes anecdotal figures advertised by BTIG Research analyst Walter Piecyk, who recently claimed that Verizon was selling more HTC Thunderbolt phones than Apple iPhones, based on conversations with retail staff.

The popularity of Apple's Verizon iPhone also refutes the constant drumbeat of posts on this message board that it would be foolish for Apple to release a CDMA iPhone at all.

BUT: Even with having the most popular handset, Apple still barely increased its market share (0.2%) for the month. I honestly thought it would have been much more. Meanwhile Android is up 7%. Very strange.
post #5 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tofino View Post

Good news or bad news - unless the numbers come from apple, it's just guessing.

I agree.
post #6 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

The popularity of Apple's Verizon iPhone also refutes the constant drumbeat of posts on this message board that it would be foolish for Apple to release a CDMA iPhone at all.

BUT: Even with having the most popular handset, Apple still barely increased its market share (0.2%) for the month. I honestly thought it would have been much more. Meanwhile Android is up 7%. Very strange.

But iPhone outsold phones which boast 4G data service.
post #7 of 51
I'm waiting for Apple's official numbers. I suspect iPhone 4 sales were merely good, but not spectacular. Any extra iPhones sold on Verizon is icing on the cake for this quarter. I had hoped a lot of Verizon customers would chuck their Android smartphones and get an iPhone 4, but I suppose that was too much to hope for. I guess it will just have to be a gradual changeover as contracts run out. \
post #8 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

I honestly thought it would have been much more. Meanwhile Android is up 7%. Very strange.

Imagine there are 9 Android phones sitting on the shelf... and 1 iPhone.

Statistically more Android phones will be sold. Not strange at all.

But remember... "Android" is a combination of software from Google... and dozens of phones from many manufacturers.

Any comparison to a single phone from one manufacturer is just silly.
post #9 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

I'm waiting for Apple's official numbers. I suspect iPhone 4 sales were merely good, but not spectacular. Any extra iPhones sold on Verizon is icing on the cake for this quarter. I had hoped a lot of Verizon customers would chuck their Android smartphones and get an iPhone 4, but I suppose that was too much to hope for. I guess it will just have to be a gradual changeover as contracts run out. \

I bet the Verizon iPhone is selling quite nicely.

Verizon has 94 million customers... which means there are about 125,000 people who are ending a 2-year contract every day. I'm sure Verizon is moving some units.

Also, the iPhone started out on only one carrier in other countries too... but ended up on up to 5 carriers today. But that doesn't mean it automatically sold 5 times as many as it did originally.

The iPhone being on Verizon is a good move overall... more carriers never hurt a phone. But I never expected it to change the world.
post #10 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

BUT: Even with having the most popular handset, Apple still barely increased its market share (0.2%) for the month. I honestly thought it would have been much more. Meanwhile Android is up 7%. Very strange.

These are last data sans Verizon iPhone's real impact. Two days (10,11 feb) are just too few. You are going to see the real impact of VZ iPhone in the next two/three PR by comScore (which means 6/9 months).

Android has a great momentum but you have to wait for the end of so many contracts (in whick android's smartphone are involved) to judge. With VZ and the (yet) possible acquisition of T-Mobile by At&t, I think iPhone can go for the 30s.

Remember: till last november, when iPhone was available only on At&t (users have the choice in buying iPhone or Android smartphones) on At&t 65% smartphones sold were iPhones (comScore data). So imagine what happen if the same thing would repeat on VZ.

I think 6/9 months from now you will see iPhone around 30%. Much depends also from WP7, altough Nokia is not so popular in US.
post #11 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Verizon has 94 million customers... which means there are about 125,000 people who are ending a 2-year contract every day.

That's exactly what I mean. comScore data are about 10th and 11st feb. Just too few to judge the real impact of VZ iPhone.

Guys, I mean: look THIS GRAPH.

I mean: when users had the chance to choice, they chose iPhone over Android.

It would be interesting if someone give us the link at the same graph but updated.
post #12 of 51
Considering the fact that the iPhone4 was already 8 months old in February, this is pretty strong. I also suspect that many businesses that were tied to VZ, are starting to replace their aging Blackberrys for the iPhone and that should also increase momentum.
post #13 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmikeo View Post

I also suspect that many businesses that were tied to VZ, are starting to replace their aging Blackberrys for the iPhone and that should also increase momentum.

I went to a conference in January... we have it once a year. Almost every person who had a Verizon Blackberry last year is now rockin' an Android device. There is simply no love for the Blackberry anymore.

It will be interesting to see, in the next year or so, how many people move to the iPhone as well.

I kinda feel bad for RIM. They started out making enterprise messaging devices and phones. Then they got a huge boost a few years ago in the consumer market.

Now, it looks like the Blackberry will revert back to being an enterprise device... as consumers simply want more from their phones.
post #14 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

I kinda feel bad for RIM. They started out making enterprise messaging devices and phones. Then they got a huge boost a few years ago in the consumer market.

Now, it looks like the Blackberry will revert back to being an enterprise device... as consumers simply want more from their phones.

Don’t feel bad for them. It’s Natural Selection at work. If you specialize too much and/or fail to adapt to changes in the environment you can push yourself to extinction. I hope they can find a solution but their touch-based phones have been bad and now the PlayBook isn’t looking so hot.

Android-based vendors have a different issue to deal with. They are all vying for the same resources within their ecosystem. This often has the effect of weakening all within that group without any clear leader as resources are scarce. We’ve seen it with Windows-based PC vendors and it’s likely we’ll see it with Android-based smartphone vendors.

I think this gives Nokia and MS’ WP7, and Apple’s IPhone and iOS a solid advantage. The iPhone is already taking over 50% of all smartphone profits in a market that is growing in popularity and I don’t see that stopping, even if the increase does slow as they reach closer to to financial monopoly.
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post #15 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

I went to a conference in January... we have it once a year. Almost every person who had a Verizon Blackberry last year is now rockin' an Android device. There is simply no love for the Blackberry anymore. [...]

Not surprising if Verizon has a stronger presence there. Or if it was any kind of technical conference. Some techies feel the need to be uber-geeky at all times, and that means carrying the most techno-geeky phone. Right up until about Wednesday that meant Android phones. But now that Android is "post-open" they can safely switch to iPhones since there's no more open source ideology to defend. Free at last!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

[...]Now, it looks like the Blackberry will revert back to being an enterprise device... as consumers simply want more from their phones. [...]

This is exactly what happened to Palm, even though Palm had more of a consumer market presence. What I mean is that RIM, like Palm before it, simply refused to advance their technology in any significant way until it was too late. Palm kept flogging the same old Palm OS horse until the iPhone 2G killed it off. I know. I had a Handspring Visor, Treo 180, Treo 600, and Treo 680. And the only changes Palm made were 1. adding a phone and 2. color. In 10 years of flailing around and doing various random acts of stupidity.

Now RIM is going to try to milk the enterprise market, because they feel that corporate IT customers are locked in. Just the way Microsoft will milk corporate IT for every last penny they can wring out of them. I think RIM might survive in the long term, but in the short term they're going to take heavy damage.

It'll take 2 or 3 years for them to get QNX right and to tweak the PlayBook hardware so it's reasonably competitive with iPad. By then it may be too late, but at least RIM controls their own destiny. They design and build the software *and* the hardware. As for the infrastructure, who cares? If they're pandering to the enterprise market, all they need is Outlook and Exchange.

RIM has even said that they will offer a Java runtime on PlayBook. To run Android apps, of all things. I wonder if Google will grant them Post-Open Android Approval...

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post #16 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


The popularity of Apple's Verizon iPhone, which comScore called "the most acquired handset in the month of February," refutes anecdotal figures advertised by BTIG Research analyst Walter Piecyk, who recently claimed that Verizon was selling more HTC Thunderbolt phones than Apple iPhones, based on conversations with retail staff.

I don't know how it refutes the Iphone being "the most acquired handset in the month of February," considering HTC Thunderbolt wasn't even released in February. Two different metrics.
post #17 of 51
Speculation: The HTC Thunderbolt is selling so well because of so many frustrated Android users who see no other way to upgrade their OS than to buy a new handset. The 4G is just a "bonus", since it can't be disabled, kills battery life, the service isn't widely available, and Verizon 3G is vastly inferior to AT&T's.
post #18 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

Speculation: The HTC Thunderbolt is selling so well because of so many frustrated Android users who see no other way to upgrade their OS than to buy a new handset. The 4G is just a "bonus", since it can't be disabled, kills battery life, the service isn't widely available, and Verizon 3G is vastly inferior to AT&T's.

It’s not fairing well at all. You really can’t turn the 4G off? At least you can turn Spritn’s WiMAX off if needed.

(link)
edit: Verizon and HTC have a solution. A battery backpack that puts it within striking distance of the iPad 2’s weight and the thickness of a MBP :

http://www.engadget.com/2011/03/21/v...-give-your-ph/
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post #19 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

Speculation: The HTC Thunderbolt is selling so well because of so many frustrated Android users who see no other way to upgrade their OS than to buy a new handset. The 4G is just a "bonus", since it can't be disabled, kills battery life, the service isn't widely available, and Verizon 3G is vastly inferior to AT&T's.

While I agree the Thunderbolt is mediocre except having LTE, let's not underestimate the need of 15-25MB/s speed on a smartphone.
post #20 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by drobforever View Post

While I agree the Thunderbolt is mediocre except having LTE, let's not underestimate the need of 15-25MB/s speed on a smartphone.

What Verizon says there network can handle and what the LTE hardware in the device says it will handle will be very different from the real world data rates of these devices. Were still limited to the comparatively slow processing of this low-power mobile HW. The best Ive seen from LTE on Verizon is inline with HSPA from T-Mobile USA.

Here is one video comparison of the Thunderbolt to the Verizon iPhone 4.
http://www.mobilecrunch.com/2011/03/...t-vs-iphone-4/ Whats funny is that the results are inline with my AT&T iPhone while getting industry leading battery life.
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post #21 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

What Verizon says there network can handle and what the LTE hardware in the device says it will handle will be very different from the real world data rates of these devices. We’re still limited to the comparatively slow processing of this low-power mobile HW. The best I’ve seen from LTE on Verizon is inline with HSPA from T-Mobile USA.

Here is one video comparison of the Thunderbolt to the Verizon iPhone 4.

http://www.mobilecrunch.com/2011/03/...t-vs-iphone-4/ What’s funny is that the results are inline with my AT&T iPhone while getting industry leading battery life.

The Thunderbolt is VERY fast. A couple of coworkers of mine have it, and they were getting 18mps down and 25mps up per Ookla's Speed Test app. By comparison, my Verizon iPhone 4 got 2mps down and 1.5mps up. Verizon's LTE kills anything else out there - Sprint, AT&T, or T-Mobile. It remains to be seen though how it performs under load. The Thunderbolt is the only phone on the network so far, besides some aircards and mobile hotspots.
post #22 of 51
And yeah, you can turn the 4G off. It's just not terribly easy to figure out, though you don't have to hack the phone or anything.
post #23 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The popularity of Apple's Verizon iPhone, which comScore called "the most acquired handset in the month of February," refutes anecdotal figures advertised by BTIG Research analyst Walter Piecyk, who recently claimed that Verizon was selling more HTC Thunderbolt phones than Apple iPhones, based on conversations with retail staff.

I think the key word here is Verizon retail staff. I can believe that the HTC Thunderbolt is matching the iPhone sales through Verizon. However, that does not account for all the iPhone sales that are going through Apple. I'd guess that half of iPhone sales go through Apple.
post #24 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

The popularity of Apple's Verizon iPhone also refutes the constant drumbeat of posts on this message board that it would be foolish for Apple to release a CDMA iPhone at all.

BUT: Even with having the most popular handset, Apple still barely increased its market share (0.2%) for the month. I honestly thought it would have been much more. Meanwhile Android is up 7%. Very strange.

Meanwhile, HTC, Samsung, LG, Motorola, and a bunch of Chinese knockoffs nobody has ever heard of, representing dozens of models combined is up 7%. Very strange indeed.

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post #25 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Meanwhile, HTC, Samsung, LG, Motorola, and a bunch of Chinese knockoffs nobody has ever heard of, representing dozens of models combined is up 7%. Very strange indeed.

Spoken like a true iFanboy. Reality is tough to digest for them.
post #26 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

I went to a conference in January... we have it once a year. Almost every person who had a Verizon Blackberry last year is now rockin' an Android device. There is simply no love for the Blackberry anymore.

It will be interesting to see, in the next year or so, how many people move to the iPhone as well.

I kinda feel bad for RIM. They started out making enterprise messaging devices and phones. Then they got a huge boost a few years ago in the consumer market.

Now, it looks like the Blackberry will revert back to being an enterprise device... as consumers simply want more from their phones.

The enterprise ha little interest in Rim..
post #27 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by srathi View Post

Spoken like a true iFanboy. Reality is tough to digest for them.

Reality is the iPone 4 was the #1 handset in the world in 2010 and is still beating the crap out of anything those manufacturers awe making, even when they are giving them away.
post #28 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wovel View Post

Reality is the iPone 4 was the #1 handset in the world in 2010 and is still beating the crap out of anything those manufacturers awe making, even when they are giving them away.

Fact check: Android 33%, Apple 25%.
post #29 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by srathi View Post

Fact check: Android 33%, Apple 25%.

I’ll trade you your fact check for a reality check. Let’s see, you took the word Android which is mobile OS, not a HW device and not a mobile company and compared it with what you wanted to say is iOS, but decided to use not the iPhone device, but instead Apple which is a company.

Who in there right mind would do that? I think you purposely have to be trolling to make that sort of mistake or you simply aren’t in your right mind to know that Android is an open (up until 3.0), freely distributed OS that can be used by company for any product they wish, and which has been used by hundreds of handsets and dozens of companies… yet you compare to one company that doesn’t license or give away its OS. Fact check, indeed!


PS: How is Android doing on PMP devices and tablets or do you just want to stick with smartphones while claiming “spoon” for what will surely be an increased Android presence on both.
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post #30 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

The popularity of Apple's Verizon iPhone also refutes the constant drumbeat of posts on this message board that it would be foolish for Apple to release a CDMA iPhone at all.

BUT: Even with having the most popular handset, Apple still barely increased its market share (0.2%) for the month. I honestly thought it would have been much more. Meanwhile Android is up 7%. Very strange.

It basically confirms what I've always thought: Samsung, Motorola, et al, are successfully up-selling their dumb phone customers to Android but their overall growth is static. So you have Apple growing its number of mobile subscribers, while everyone else is either losing subs or remaining static, but the others are moving their own dumb phone customers to smart phones, which means they show dramatic growth when you just look at smart phones.

The reason Android has such dramatic growth is because it was picked up by a handful of large established players in the market. They could roll it out quickly. They already had deals in place with every carrier, in every territory. Apple is a newcomer and can't compete with these guys in terms of distribution in the mobile phone space (retail space is another matter). So what the manufacturers have managed to achieve is to up-sell customers to phones that need data plans, which is great for carriers (the carriers have been the winners with Android), but they still don't have Apple's margins and that's what they want.
post #31 of 51
I bought a ThunderBolt last week because I tether at home.

With an extended battery that makes my phone look like ass, and weighs a ton, I got a whopping 9 hours of use out of it today as a phone, no tethering.

What a flipping joke.
post #32 of 51
I recently watched Johnny Mnemonic.

Keannu Reeves uses a Thompson iPhone and all the comms are through AT&T.

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post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by srathi View Post

Fact check: Android 33%, Apple 25%.


Let's not forget the iPod touch.

Interesting that no named manufacturer except Samsung increased Market share but that Android did. Attack of the cheap clones. Apple can offset that with a cheaper model, and in post-open Android these devices are stuck on 2.3. Apple will move everything from the 3GS on to iOS 5.

This is pretty good news. Apple tops in feb, maintains it's position against the latest and greatest Android the next month, increases Market share for the quarter even though the V phone is out only in Feb, and if it maintains this steady growth on 2 carriers it should do even better on all 4. And the iPhone 5 , iOS 5, and purported cheap model on the way.

Meanwhile Androids 7% is to unnamed cheap manyfacturers indicating that Apple is taking more of the high end.
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post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sciwiz View Post

I don't know how it refutes the Iphone being "the most acquired handset in the month of February," considering HTC Thunderbolt wasn't even released in February. Two different metrics.

Shhh! Don't tell Mr. "I hate tea party republicans" that!
post #35 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by srathi View Post

Spoken like a true iFanboy. Reality is tough to digest for them.

Where is the average cost per handset?

Where I work Android phones range from $149 and $169 for a Huawei Ideos and SonyEricsson X8, $299 and $349 for Motorola Flipout and HTC legend, $799 and $899 for Galaxy S and desire HD up to $949 for a sonyericsson X10.

iPhones are $749, $849 and $999 for 8GB 3GS and 16 & 32 GB 4's.

These are all outright handset prices, they are priced slightly differently tied to plans ranging from $19 to $100 a month on contract.

The revenue handset makers make on Android phones is split across a wide range of manufacturers, models and pricepoints, it's the area where Apple is comprehensively and undeniably dominating no matter what "marketshare" based on raw handset sales is going to Android.

My company wants us to push Android because they can make money on customised services they build into the handsets, without them Android will be dropped, Google will find it hard to change their sales model to be less friendly to carrier customisation.
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post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by srathi View Post

Fact check: Android 33%, Apple 25%.

Question:

Which would you rather have:

a) 15% or less of the 33% at razor thin margins?

or

b) 100% of the 25% at a hefty margin?

Show us how smart you are...
Hmmmmmm...
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Hmmmmmm...
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post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkalu View Post

But iPhone outsold phones which boast 4G data service.

Not only that, but it's an iPhone model due to be refreshed in four months. It never ceases to amaze me just how many people fully realize that iPhones are updated every June...
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Now, it looks like the Blackberry will revert back to being an enterprise device...

There's no refuge for them in the enterprise...

Quote:
consumers simply want more from their phones.

What makes you think consumers are the only ones who want more?
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post

Not only that, but it's an iPhone model due to be refreshed in four months. It never ceases to amaze me just how many people fully realize that iPhones are updated every June...

This time, iPhone is not going to be updated till 2012 so your argument is moot.
post #40 of 51
Quick question for those who have huge respect for ease of use of iOS:

how easy is it to toggle 3G on/off on an iPhone? I'm sure it is a one touch "easy" step!
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