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Gartner's iPhone, Android predictions radically revised in a year and a half

post #1 of 209
Thread Starter 
Gartner recently issued a new prediction of the direction of the smartphone industry, but its last one from 2009 doesn't suggest the company has very accurate foresight.

This week, Gartner said it believes that Google's Android platform would be used by 49 percent of all smartphones by 2012 and that by 2015, Microsoft's Windows Phone would leap to second place among smartphone platforms (not counting tablets or media players), overtaking Apple's iOS iPhone. The firm supplied very precise numbers for its claims, down to the thousands of units.

Last prediction wasn't very accurate

Just a year and a half ago, the same firm made similar bold predictions about the smartphone industry that suggested the same dramatic turn around for Microsoft. In fact, the only real similarity between the company's 2009 predictions and its 2011 predictions is the idea that Microsoft would be selling about 68 million phones by 2012, and taking around 12 percent of the smartphone industry.

Every other predicted element in Garner's outlook has changed significantly in the last year and a half. Nokia's Symbian, once seen as holding on to the lion's share of smartphones in 2012 (with more market share than it managed to retain last year) is now expected to dry up and blow away, given Nokia's plans to drop support for it and focus on WP7 later this year.

Android, originally expected to reach essentially a dead heat with Apple, Microsoft and RIM (all reaching within one percentage point of having 13 percent shares of the market), is now seen as taking half of the market, while Apple's share is now expected to grow much faster than Gartner originally predicted just 18 months ago (grabbing 19 percent as opposed to just 13 by 2012).

Gartner also revised its outlook for RIM, suggesting less of a loss in market share than originally anticipated back in 2009. The firm also slashed its collective outlook for Palm's WebOS and other smartphone operating systems (such as non-Android Linux) in half.

It foresees so little growth among WebOS, other (non-Android) Linux, and other mobile operating systems that it now dumps them all into one category. Note that prior to Android's release, many of Google's licensees (including Motorola) were already broadly using Linux, which Android incorporates.



Gartner's vision in 2009: open wins, but mostly Microsoft does

Gartner's most recent prediction is an acknowledgment that it had no real notion of what was going to happen just 18 months ago. Gartner's original prediction in late 2009 essentially just plotted continued, conservative growth paths out for Apple, RIM and Palm, the three major vendors who own their own operating system. It drew tremendous growth in sales for Nokia's platform, likely due to the company releasing Symbian as an open source project, even though Nokia continued to be the primary (and almost exclusive) user of Symbian.

Android was also given a dramatic projection of unit growth of nearly 11x over three years, as it was just beginning to gain traction. In late 2009, Verizon Wireless was gearing up to replace its former dependance upon RIM's BlackBerry platform with new Android-based partnerships with HTC and Motorola under its "Droid" branded campaign.

However, the biggest and most difficult to fathom prediction by Gartner was Microsoft's reversal of fortune for Windows Mobile. That platform had already clearly lost its initial momentum, with sales remaining flat since the iPhone debuted in 2007. Despite those dim prospects, while Gartner suggested in 2009 that RIM's sales would nearly double and Apple's would almost triple, it stated that Microsoft's would grow more than 4.5x in the same three year period.

Rather than that happening, Microsoft's Windows Mobile platform continue to decline through 2010 despite a heavily promoted deal with LG. And when Microsoft released WP7 as its improved new version of the platform and ended compatibility with previous versions of Windows Mobile, sales tanked completely.

Gartner's 2009 predictions were essentially a bet that openly licensed platforms would make tremendous gains in the market while Apple and RIM would only make incremental progress. While Gartner was correct in guessing that Android would make big gains, it also stated that both Microsoft and Nokia would also grow their platforms at a dramatic rate.

Given that Android, Symbian and Windows Mobile all compete to served the same finite group of phone makers, the prediction that all three platforms would each explode and far outpace the growth of the independent Apple and RIM doesn't appear to have a solid logical foundation. In the end, Gartner's 2009 prediction made three bold claims about change in the smartphone industry's trajectory, two of which were completely wrong and one of which wasn't bold enough. It also clearly underestimated Apple and RIM.



Gartner's vision in 2011: open wins, but mostly Microsoft does

Gartner has now corrected its vision with a new set of predictions that now see Symbian collapsing rapidly, following Nokia's announcement that it would stop promoting its use internally and more recently that it is shutting down its open source project supporting it.

The second major correction in vision sees Android continuing to explode in adoption, growing nearly as fast as it did in 2010, when it was protected from much direct competition with the iPhone in the US, while it was being exclusively backed by Motorola, and while Microsoft and Symbian were both experiencing retooling fiascos.

Gartner also corrected its expectations of the iPhone. It now expects Apple to nearly double its sales this year, leaping from 47 million to 91 million. Next year however, it says Apple will only grow by an additional 28 million units, and then continue to expand by just over 35 million per year through 2015. The means that over the next five years, Gartner thinks the iPhone will grow by just 4x.

Instead of projecting three years into the future, Gartner is now peering a full five years out. That's when it sees Microsoft nudging past the iPhone by 35 million units to become the second place mobile operating system behind Android. Microsoft's resurrection of WP7 is expected to come via help from Nokia, with the fruits of their partnership resulting in a doubling of sales this year alone, despite the fact that Nokia doesn't expect to deliver its first WP7 model until the end of the year at the earliest.

Across five years, Microsoft's unit sales are expected to grow by an astounding 17.9x, more than twice as fast as Android and 4.4x faster than Apple.



Gartner's profitable projections

Gartner's projection of WP7 overtaking the iPhone and outpacing Android growth by 2015 is literally the only good news available for Windows Phone 7, which has completely flopped as a consumer platform despite a half billion dollar ad campaign.

Even Microsoft's leading partner LG called its launch as disappointing and the software itself as being "a bit boring."

If Gartner's historical predictions were more accurate, it would be harder to suggest that the firm was simply concocting its numbers to fit a particular outcome for profit rather than modeling numbers to deliver a useful outlook for the market.

It certainly wouldn't be the first time. Microsoft's confidential memos leaked during its monopoly trial state that the company paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to Gartner as it "lobbied" the firm to change its outlook to flatter Windows NT and denigrate competing Network Computers in the late 90s prior to that trial.

More recently, Gartner analysts began predicting in 2005 that Windows Mobile 5 would cause big trouble for Symbian, something that never happened. In 2009, the outlook for Windows Mobile was so bleak that even Gartner refused to say it would surpass the iPhone in three years. The situation for Microsoft has only grown worse over the last year and a half, with the company's Nokia deal seeing little positive comment in the tech media.

Gartner's latest prediction now claims Microsoft's WP7 will grow by more than 1,790 percent over the next five years, significantly faster than Android or the iPhone over the same time period, faster than Android grew last year, and faster even than Gartner incorrectly predicted Windows Mobile would grow back in 2009.
post #2 of 209
I really don't see a bright future for windows phone 7, it may end up being one of microsofts biggest failures yet.
post #3 of 209
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post #4 of 209
JUST like it has been for the past 25 years in the PC business and now into a FAR MORE fluid market than has EVER existed before, Gartner still holds firm to the Microshaft-funded view of the world. They have been spewing this line of PROVABLE LIE for decades... Didn't believe them then (having been proven a good bet) and don't believe them now.... AND, probably never will...
post #5 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

The Digler Rule:

If an analyst revises his claims in ways that favor Apple, he's "gained insight".
But if an analyst revises his claims in ways that are unflattering for Apple, he's "not very accurate".

Danny can play with his spreadsheet all he wants,staying up late to try to find the most alarming-looking charts he can muster from his selective portrayal of the data, but none of his button-pushing can change the most salient fact which seem to have him so upset: Android is currently outselling iOS.

Poor Danny.

You just can't seem to absorb the fact that there is no such thing as "Android"! "Android" is a mish-mash of dozens of mutually incompatible platforms that you like to throw into a blender and turn into the Google-Aid™ smoothies that have addled your brain cells so thoroughly.
post #6 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac-sochist View Post

You just can't seem to absorb the fact that there is no such thing as "Android"! "Android" is a mish-mash of dozens of mutually incompatible platforms that you like to throw into a blender and turn into the Google-Aid smoothies that have addled your brain cells so thoroughly.

Dang, that's some serious case of denial. So what OS are all those not-iOS phones using? Feeling that Apple's system is superior, or that the ecosystem serves users better is one thing. Claiming Android doesn't exist?
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post #7 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

The Digler Rule:

If an analyst revises his claims in ways that favor Apple, he's "gained insight".
But if an analyst revises his claims in ways that are unflattering for Apple, he's "not very accurate".

Danny can play with his spreadsheet all he wants,staying up late to try to find the most alarming-looking charts he can muster from his selective portrayal of the data, but none of his button-pushing can change the most salient fact which seem to have him so upset: Android is currently outselling iOS.

Poor Danny.

The Market Rule:

Which Android? There are many? Which handset? There are many. That's like saying more people drink water than Coke? Yes they do.

Also I thought the article was about Gartner? Are you a Gartner analyst or someone who buys a lot of Gartner subscriptions and has a highly rated product? you know, the upper right quadrant of the copyrighted "Magic Quadrant"

The market rule says Apple, AT&T and Verizon make a lot of money on iPhones, companies using the many variations of Android, not so much
post #8 of 209
When Apple re-releases the iPhone 3GS as a $200 contract-free smartphone, Android growth will flat-out

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post #9 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

The Digler Rule:

If an analyst revises his claims in ways that favor Apple, he's "gained insight".
But if an analyst revises his claims in ways that are unflattering for Apple, he's "not very accurate".

Danny can play with his spreadsheet all he wants,staying up late to try to find the most alarming-looking charts he can muster from his selective portrayal of the data, but none of his button-pushing can change the most salient fact which seem to have him so upset: Android is currently outselling iOS.

Poor Danny.


yes, "outselling" !! the FREE product is OUTSELLING !! LOL LOL LOL
Make sure I never hire you : here boss, sales are up 5000% since we started giving it away !

post #10 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

The Digler Rule:

If an analyst revises his claims in ways that favor Apple, he's "gained insight".
But if an analyst revises his claims in ways that are unflattering for Apple, he's "not very accurate".

Danny can play with his spreadsheet all he wants,staying up late to try to find the most alarming-looking charts he can muster from his selective portrayal of the data, but none of his button-pushing can change the most salient fact which seem to have him so upset: Android is currently outselling iOS.

Poor Danny.

In all fairness, what does this article say that is a) about Android or b) unflattering to Android?

I think the point, if you have basic reading skills, is that Gartner's predictions are not any sort of effort at scientific modeling, but rather just numbers to back up Microsoft, with Android thrown in to capture headlines.

Attacking the author of the article, particularly with such a baseless accusation that has nothing to do with the article, just makes you look like an ignorant mouthy moron.

If anything, DED pointed out that Gartner's first prediction under-estimated the growth of Android in 2009 and its correction (clearly being criticized) was corrected to indicate Apple and RIM would do far better than Gartner originally said. So what exactly are you bleating about?
post #11 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Android is currently outselling iOS.

No, Android is outselling iOS on phones. Overall iOS is still winning by a large factor, if you count all iOS devices (iPod touches, iPads and iPhones). This matters because the app market includes all of these devices.
post #12 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by NormM View Post

No, Android is outselling iOS on phones. Overall iOS is still winning by a large factor, if you count all iOS devices (iPod touches, iPads and iPhones). This matters because the app market includes all of these devices.

That's a basic error right there. Android isn't OUTSELLING anything. It's given away free to anybody who will use it, including Mama San's Homebrew Smartphone (with fried rice). Sure, if you give something away, you'll get lots of users, but that doesn't mean their products compete with a professional, secure, reliable and highly functional ecosystem like Apple's iOS.

It doesn't mean someone has SELECTED Android in preference to iOS. They've just used something that's free to get their (often junky) hardware shipped.
post #13 of 209
I think Gartner’s estimes for WP7 are quite high but I wouldn’t count MS out of the running completely. WP7 has a lot going for it.

I think we need to wait to see what Nokia and MS come up with before we can get firm grasp on what to expect for the future of those companies. Even Dell has finally managed to turn out a decent looking and functioning smartphone.
I’m going to put this one out there - of the current crop of Windows Phone 7 devices, the Venue Pro is my favorite. It’s exceedingly well designed and well built, but the biggest difference between this and similarly well designed products from HTC and Samsung is that the Dell is the one device that’s really new.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4151/t...ue-pro-review/ If Dell can better itself in HW design then I can’t count out MS+Nokia in a future arsenal of WP7 devices.


Quote:
Originally Posted by seanie248 View Post

yes, "outselling" !! the FREE product is OUTSELLING !! LOL LOL LOL
Make sure I never hire you : here boss, sales are up 5000% since we started giving it away !


Right?! A free OS v an OS that isn’t even sold or giving away to any vendor. MS has 90% marketshare with a paid for desktop OS and Gartner isn’t even predicting that Android can manage 50% despite being free and apparently so incredibly superior. What the hell is wrong with Android that it hasn’t become a monopoly at this point? I think he’s been hit on the hit head by that Museum Glass® he’s always rambling on about. Hell, he can’t even spell Dilger’s name correctly.

I’m not sure why AI allows this guy to post. He doesn’t ever add anything to the thread and will attack Dilger and AI on every thread regardless of what is stated. Just yesterday he attacked AI for being wrong for posting a rumour as a rumour.
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post #14 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukeskymac View Post

When Apple re-releases the iPhone 3GS as a $200 contract-free smartphone, Android growth will flat-out

Just curious: Android growth will flat out what? Flat out triple its share? Flat out die? Flat out prove Jobs right|wrong?
post #15 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

The Digler Rule:

If an analyst revises his claims in ways that favor Apple, he's "gained insight".
But if an analyst revises his claims in ways that are unflattering for Apple, he's "not very accurate".

Danny can play with his spreadsheet all he wants,staying up late to try to find the most alarming-looking charts he can muster from his selective portrayal of the data, but none of his button-pushing can change the most salient fact which seem to have him so upset: Android is currently outselling iOS.

Poor Danny.

This article is about pointing out the false accounting of data by gardner. Not about flavoring Apple. You are such a Apple hater, fanboy! Just relax already.
post #16 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by NormM View Post

No, Android is outselling iOS on phones. Overall iOS is still winning by a large factor, if you count all iOS devices (iPod touches, iPads and iPhones). This matters because the app market includes all of these devices.

Actually it is conceivable that Android devices are outselling all iOS devices combined. In the 4th quarter of last year Apple was reported to have sold 33 million iOS devices (iPods, iPhones, iPads). At around the same time Google showed 300,000 devices sold per day. So a straightline projection of iOS devices for twelve months of this year would be 132million. Doing the same with Android figures yields 110 million. But Android tablets just came to market. It would only take a very few million of several different tablets to let Android overtake Apple's iOS devices in totality. Add to that Android currently growing at a faster pace than iOS. Could that 300,000 Android devices per day three months ago have grown to 350,000 or more per day now? The clear lead that iOS had in the middle of 2010 may be much more tenuous now. IMHO, it is a possibility that Android is currently outselling all iOS devices combined.

Who's selling more devices really doesn't matter of course. It's plain that Apple is making much more profit from their devices, especially combined with iTunes music and AppStore revenue. But making the statement "overall iOS is outselling Android by a wide margin" may not be true.
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post #17 of 209
Joke Of The Day
post #18 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

If Dell can better itself in HW design then I cant count out MS+Nokia in a future arsenal of WP7 devices.

Hey Soli, thanks for the laugh!

I can't speak about the current Dell way of doing things (e.g. committing much of a budget to R&D) but Michael Dell used to speak proudly about how his company had a minimal R&D budget because the simply ordered stuff off the shelf from various mfrs, got some cheap lalor to slap everything together, then load a Windoze OS onto it. He used to think that was the way to do do it, differentiating Dell from the crowd by selling by mail order and providing decent customer service, certainly not by coming up with any ground-breaking designs.

Is it truly different now?
post #19 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Dang, that's some serious case of denial. So what OS are all those not-iOS phones using? Feeling that Apple's system is superior, or that the ecosystem serves users better is one thing. Claiming Android doesn't exist?

They're using dozens of partially or completely incompatible OSs with enough of a family resemblance that people like to lump them together with a one-word descriptorbut thinking "Android" is a single, monolithic OS is just delusional.

Suppose the 90% of the market that Windows PCs represent had dozens or hundreds of somewhat incompatible versions so that you couldn't be sure that any given software would run on your machine? (Kind of like the early DOS days, which I'm old enough to remember.) Would you crow about "Windows" having 90% of the market? Maybe you would, but who would benefit? Not the end-user, just Microsoft.

Similarly today, The only ones benefiting from "Android's" marketshare are Google and the spammers they're pimping your eyeballs to.
post #20 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by steftheref View Post

Android isn't OUTSELLING anything. It's given away free to anybody who will use it

It doesn't mean someone has SELECTED Android in preference to iOS. They've just used something that's free to get their (often junky) hardware shipped.

iPhone 3GS is available for free in Europe and for $49 in US.
post #21 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by srathi View Post

iPhone 3GS is available for free in Europe and for $49 in US.

And where are the two-year-old "Android" phones that are "selling" at all, even for free?
post #22 of 209
Seems to me the primary basis for this set of forecasts is the manufacturing capacity of the companies offering each platform. It thus assumes that whoever is capable of building the most smart phones sells the most smart phones. Such a curious concept; assuming that customers do not care between one model and another and that a mfrs ability to crank out widgets determines its ability to sell them. Despite all these iPod/iPhone/iPad killers that have shriveled up and died in the middle of their journey down the birth canal.
post #23 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ecphorizer View Post

Hey Soli, thanks for the laugh!

I can't speak about the current Dell way of doing things (e.g. committing much of a budget to R&D) but Michael Dell used to speak proudly about how his company had a minimal R&D budget because the simply ordered stuff off the shelf from various mfrs, got some cheap lalor to slap everything together, then load a Windoze OS onto it. He used to think that was the way to do do it, differentiating Dell from the crowd by selling by mail order and providing decent customer service, certainly not by coming up with any ground-breaking designs.

Is it truly different now?

Looking at the Streak heck no, but looking at the Venue Pro it very well could be, though that is just one not completely bad device which I think is a big step for Dell though well have to see if they can make it an upward trend and not a one time event.
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post #24 of 209
So they expect every Nokia customer to buy a crap cloner Windows 7 Phone. LOL. People who have Nokia phones now had a choice of buying Windows Mobile and now Windows Phone 7. And they did not, they bought a Symbian based phone. So Gartner is saying people who rejected the crap Windows cloner OS before are going to magically forget the reasons they did not buy a cloner Windows 7 Phone and buy one? I do not think so.
post #25 of 209
It's actually safe to write off anything Gartner says. At least in this case DED is correct, and there is no empirical evidence to suggest anything Gartner says about Win7 will change.
post #26 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac-sochist View Post

And where are the two-year-old "Android" phones that are "selling" at all, even for free?

Do you accept that iPhone is also available for 'free', and is junk?
post #27 of 209
I guess the thing to remember is that Apple is still the (or a) winner here since IOS only runs on Apple hardware. Gartner shows big increases in IOS adoption which means big increases in Apple hardware sales. How could this possibly be bad? Plus Windows Mobile will run on many different hardware models most of which won't be made by Microsoft right? Doesn't seem like that big of a win for MS.
post #28 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac-sochist View Post

They're using dozens of partially or completely incompatible OSs with enough of a family resemblance that people like to lump them together with a one-word descriptor—but thinking "Android" is a single, monolithic OS is just delusional.

Suppose the 90% of the market that Windows PCs represent had dozens or hundreds of somewhat incompatible versions so that you couldn't be sure that any given software would run on your machine? (Kind of like the early DOS days, which I'm old enough to remember.) Would you crow about "Windows" having 90% of the market? Maybe you would, but who would benefit? Not the end-user, just Microsoft.

Similarly today, The only ones benefiting from "Android's" marketshare are Google and the spammers they're pimping your eyeballs to.

Well, that's not really true. The latest Google OS distribution chart shows a total of seven versions since it was first released for mobile devices. Only about 6% of current devices still use a version incompatible with many of the Android Market applications. Even an estimated 15% of iPhones are using an old unsupported iOS version. No telling how many iPods are no longer supported. So the problem isn't so much Android itself. It's the phone manufacturers that use it. To make their product "unique" many insist on adding another layer of functions, a UI specific to their company. It's the phone suppliers themselves that are causing delays in extending the very latest OS updates to their already sold devices in a timely manner. The few smartphones that use a "pure" Android interface are seeing updates as quickly as the Android Open Source Project releases them. While there's some advantages to having an "open" (?) development platform, there's also inherent problems. Who know at this point if Google, as the primary developer, can overcome them.

As far as no one making money, the phone manufacturers are not donating phones to the Telcos. If the Sprints, AT&T's and Verizons of the world wish to use them as promotion tools, making thousands in contract fees for every one moved, then fine by the consumer. You have to assume it makes business sense for them to have a few as BOGO deals, pulling in customers they might not have otherwise. Most phones are NOT free tho, with the better devices going for $200-$250 with new 2-year contracts. But companies like HTC who actually build those phones are seeing record profits, with the telcos eating some of the cost just as they do with the iPhone.

So again, arguing for iOS as more stable, a better user experience, easier to understand or a better overall value with more available applications than Android? Valid. The points you use for your argument? Not really IMHO.
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post #29 of 209
There was a recent article with 92% of 2000 employees of Clorox choosing iphones. 6% android and 2% windows. When people are thinking about market share obviously price is factoring in when people are buying android. That and the fact that some carriers do or did not have iphone for a while.
post #30 of 209
Folks - the significant takeaway here is *not* what's going on in Android-land, or nearby.

What is important to remember is that Gartner's credibility is near zero. At least in markets such as this. Maybe they're OK in the more traditional, business-oriented IT stuff where you can look at trends and extrapolate. However, that is not where we are in this case. We're in a period of disruption and major change and Gartner doesn't have a good track record in that space recently.
post #31 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by srathi View Post

iPhone 3GS is available for free in Europe and for $49 in US.

on big contracts. iOS is way ahead in Europe in any case.
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post #32 of 209
It's really getting old listening to analysts try and force old analysis on a new product field that bears little or no resemblance to the old market.

Like in this case, windows was not and never has been an open OS. It was open in that any parts you found on the street could be used by the OS, but the code itself was very proprietary.

So, because google claims android is an open OS, people compare it to windows. This is ridiculous, even of android were open, then it would be Linux, not windows. Yet, android isn't open software. 2nd, there will never be a market of home built/self upgraded phones, the primary advantage windows provided over Mac. Plus there are carriers involved in the phone game, there was none if this for PCs.

Additionally, windows was probably best served by it's huge development community, and now that advantage lies squarely with apple. So, if little to no part of this market is modeled by the past, why would the PC market be a valuable guide fir the future of the phone market.

Finally, how on earth can you even pretend to predict a technology market 5 years in advance? It's a complete joke. In 2006 the mobile phone industry was predicting everyone would own two feature phones by now. Except now most of us don't even own one, and how many people own two smartphones? (I know, some do, but it's hardly a major force in the market).

Finally, the one positive for WP7 is it's alliance with nokia. But as allthe people graduate from feature phones to smartphones, why would they necessarily stay with nokia? Unless WP7 comes out with a popular device, then all these people will mostly adopt the iPhone or android at this rate. This, of course, could change if MS releases a competitive product, which is why I don't predict sales for almost twice as long out as the product itself has even been in existence.

/rant
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post #33 of 209
Yup. It's being said that Android is the new Windows.

I'm curious. How exactly is that a compliment?
post #34 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by srathi View Post

Do you accept that iPhone is also available for 'free', and is junk?

Since the first quote you put my name on isn't even from me, I don't have to accept anything.
post #35 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Yup. It's being said that Android is the new Windows.

Hardly. Microsoft had the business sense to charge for its OS.
post #36 of 209
Google doesn't charge the consumer for anything does it? Google Navigation, Google Voice, etc, etc. . . All free. It's a very odd business plan that I really don't understand.

As for Gartner's projections, they're no more than educated guesses, no more valid than any of these other "analysts" than seem to pop up every day. Show me the money. That's all that counts in the end.
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post #37 of 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Google doesn't charge the consumer for anything does it? Google Navigation, Google Voice, etc, etc. . . All free. It's a very odd business plan that I really don't understand.

Ads. If you like Google * then you will use it more.

Course iAds exist too, with the advantage of being "immersive", whatever the **** that means.
post #38 of 209
Gartner "predictions" are only accurate if you buy into its self-fulfilling prophecies.

In the past, management types read this garbage, and believing it, bought into the predictions and made decisions making the predictions true. Gartner is as clueless at they ever were.

Let me say this once and for all. It is not possible to predict the future. Sorry children, psychics don't exist, astrology is there to fleece the unclean masses. No Santa Claus, and no Easter Bunny either.

Faith healing, also false, reading tea leaves, not true, tarot cards, no way, palm reading, you've got to be kidding, ouija boards, bridge to nowhere, seances, you've got to be dead from the neck up, Gartner, sheltered workshop of the mindless.
post #39 of 209
If Gartner is so wrong, why do you keep posting their stuff AI?
post #40 of 209
From 300+ Android phones, may be only 10% are on par or slightly better than 3GS, the rest are crap. Even Android tablets are barely keeping up with iPad 1. It just like saying number of sold stones outnumbers number of sold gold.
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  • Gartner's iPhone, Android predictions radically revised in a year and a half
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Gartner's iPhone, Android predictions radically revised in a year and a half