or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac OS X › Inside Mac OS X 10.7: Apple to strip most Aqua gloss
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Inside Mac OS X 10.7: Apple to strip most Aqua gloss - Page 3

post #81 of 179
I like the new look. I don't think they are heading toward Windows or OS 9, they are heading toward iOS. Trying to make some of those good vibes rub off on the Mac, and make it that iPhone/iPad users will feel at home on a Mac and want to buy one. Even iMac/MBP hardware resembles the iPhone somewhat, with their big black screens.

And how the scrollbars behave (disappear/not disappear) is a System Preference so don't worry.

The only part of the new look I don't like is toolbar/sidebar icons losing their colour (but once again this is inspired by iPad). But all the buttons/sliders etc are great. Maybe icons should lose their color if you select the grey look in System prefs, but otherwise be coloured.
post #82 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post

You say I may be pleasantly surprised, by what might I ask? I've seen the same screen captures you have. What is it that I may find so pleasing? You're talking to someone that was elated when 10.0 came out and I got to experience aqua after 9.2. My first 600 MHz iBook (my first laptop ever) ran both OS's and I used them both. I loved the look of OS X. I loved seeing my friends who were Windows lovers (and some still are today) looking at how fantastic it looked on that rather low resolution screen.

Just move forward to Lion and I'm sitting here with an 8-core Mac Pro and a 30" Cinema Display with more than a HD resolution, and I'm watching the OS bleach out until it's nothing more than a bunch of gray buttons and disappearing sliders. And you suggest that I might be pleasantly surprised? What exactly would you have me be pleasantly surprised by? I'd really like to know. What is it that you find so awe inspiring with an OS that has all the appearance of the gravel in my driveway? I know there are people who are easily distracted, and I'm sorry for them, but I'm not one of those people who gets distracted. I see the OS I've supported from the very beginning becoming something that's not even interesting to look at. When an OS is no longer interesting to interact with, what is there really? What's the point? Gestures? Is that all I have to look forward to? I can't even manage to teach my parents how to use the gestures included in Snow Leopard. What's the point of even trying to get them to use the gestures with Lion?

Let's be blunt here and accept the fact that there are two kinds of users in the Mac Community. There are those people who want nothing. They want bare bones. These people exist in Terminal, and they think that even iTunes has far too much color for their world. They get distracted by everything around them, and they don't want anything between them and what they are doing. Then, at the opposite side of the spectrum, you have people like me. I don't use the Terminal, I enjoyed Aqua, I enjoyed the Dock not being that reflective thing, and I enjoyed the OS being so fantastically different visually from everything else out there that people were literally drawn to look at my screen and ask about all the things they were seeing.

I've converted over 40 colleagues alone to the Mac OS. Every single person in my immediate family has switched over to the Mac because of my insistence. I'm the one they all call when they can't figure out how to do something. What does it tell you as a fellow Mac user when you see someone who's been with the OS since it first turned to color, all of a sudden having very serious doubts about my love for Lion? I've seen the same screen shots you have. It's appallingly bland and doesn't appeal to the eye in even the slightest way, in my opinion. It seems that the people who want to see nothing, and experience the least possible from the OS have won. What I've seen of Lion is about as visually impressive as the inside of a hospital. It's apparently what you want in an OS. I may end up using it, but they'll never get me to say that I find it visually pleasing. I never thought I see the day when I'd lose faith in the Mac OS, but Lion has truly let down those of us looking for something more, not less, from our interaction with the OS from what I've seen so far. It's just depressing.

OK. I'm gonna give ya the benefit of the doubt here, because you have helped other people discover the Mac. You're probably right in that many people have a difficult time differentiating in shades of gray... they need big colorful buttons and sorts... like "Fisher-Price XP".

So I'm curious: can you show us how YOU would design the GUI? Or, what are your favorite website designs?

Me personally:

1) Aqua needs to go, not only because it is dated, but because it just plain looks awkward as it is at the moment (the water bubble for instance looks like a screen failure).

2) all of that Faux-look stuff needs to definitely get off of "my desktop" one way or another!!! Notice I did not degrade it or the people that like it... it's just not for me!

3) Can we agree, that to please both sides of this "personal taste" argument, Apple or a third party like Onyx, MUST add the ability to "mod" or preference change the Lion OS to your liking?

PS. I've "converted" many hundreds more than you have, and to tell ya the truth, there are a number of them in memory that are suspect to having the same point of view as you do. So I better be prepared and careful when these arguments hit me. Thanks for the heads up
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #83 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

I would be curious to know the amount if code it takes for each style. If the drab takes a third the lines of code for each element then you could have the reason right there.

Further possible reasons:
  • The Aqua look was very hard to imitate in html.
  • Also, Apple wants its apps to look nice for people used to Windows, adding subtleties to set it apart from Windows apps.
  • Of course, successful interface elements in iOS will migrate back to MacOSX

One thing I abhor, and have seen in certain iOS apps is that plain buttons are sometimes used for drop-down menus. There should be enough differentiation between interface elements that have distinct functionality.
post #84 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by uberben View Post

These are the kind of posts that shutdown discussion and turn this into a discussion about people hating other people instead of what people like. Things would be much clearer if those that talked like a politician trying to bias people were prevented from posting.

Because I disagree with the way Lion is turning out, and that I'm not praising the design of the OS, it's color palette, and it's elimination of scrollbars, is reason enough to suggest that my opinion as a lifelong Mac user holds no merit here? There are plenty of people in this thread who are very happy with the direction the OS is taking, and they've made their points. When I asked what would make me pleasantly surprised by Lion, you suggest I not be allowed to post? I asked the questions, I validated my points, and gave a brief description of my long history with the Mac. I certainly didn't personally attack you, or mstone. I did take issue with what ThePixelDoc said because he was telling me to switch to Windows rather than voice my opposition for the way Lion is looking. I'm not going to be told to jump ship when I have a differing opinion of how the OS ought to look.

I've been with this site since 2003, and I've rarely voiced my opinion. I'm not in the habit of posting bitter diatribes about all things Mac. Most of the time I have no position regarding postings. With Lion, and all that I've seen posted thus far, I've taken exception with the way it looks. I like the look of Aqua (which is what the OP is about) and I think leaving it behind for the look of Lion is a misstep.
Fortes Fortuna Adiuvat
Reply
Fortes Fortuna Adiuvat
Reply
post #85 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavyD View Post

I agree.

Me too. The only thing that i very dislike are the new scrollbars, even in iOS!! I want to see them. F.e. i want to know how much is hidden of the document or view, with no scrollbars i can see that.
post #86 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post

I'd never take advice from someone who has a gray screen by choice. You certainly aren't the rule, you're the exception. The iOS has one or two people buying Apple products because it's colorful. You must really hate that. I do have an iPhone and I won't give it up. It has far more color on the puny screen than I've seen in Lion so far.

As for your Windows comment, you're clearly mistaken, I've been with Mac since System 7. I've never owned a Windows PC, and the only ones I have interacted with have been at work where I was forced to use them. Of course I think you just enjoy being hostile toward people who don't see things your way. Good luck inspiring people with that.

Well considering that I'm an Art Director/Designer and consultant for many packaging firms, and that I have come into contact with 100's (1000's?) of Mac users since 1984, your assessment that I can't inspire people is wrong... since I/we indeed "insist" on 100-128rgb backgrounds. I will grant you, it is an industry specific preference.

Please see by my above post, that I am willing to meet you and the average user half-way, or your way even, if Apple or a 3rd party software gives us (hopefully) that choice.

My apologies that we designer-types are confronted with tastes and trends daily, and are paid well to influence people with our personal design sense and taste, to buy our clients products. The average person does not know why they can "perceive" what is expensive, what makes an item a "luxury item", or a why a simple curve, color, material... can influence their perception of an image or brand.

Apple is probably the only big company in the tech sector that truly understands this, thanks to Jonny Ive, the graphic design dept. at Apple... and of course to SJ for pushing for a "complete image concept".

I sell this advice daily, and if I come across as hostile, it's because I often (probably today even), will be confronted with people just not getting "it", and I'll be "flummoxed" trying to justify what they did to our concept on their own... and then fight even harder to get them back on track.

Again my apologies for "putting a face" to your argument, that was sadly that of one of my more difficult clients. What I posted here... is what I would have liked to have said to him personally! Naturally I didn't.. and I'm venting here.

On a positive note: a HUGE Thank You for being my virtual punching bag
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #87 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

OK. I'm gonna give ya the benefit of the doubt here, because you have helped other people discover the Mac. You're probably right in that many people have a difficult time differentiating in shades of gray... they need big colorful buttons and sorts... like "Fisher-Price XP".

So I'm curious: can you show us how YOU would design the GUI? Or, what are your favorite website designs?

Me personally:

1) Aqua needs to go, not only because it is dated, but because it just plain looks awkward as it is at the moment (the water bubble for instance looks like a screen failure).

2) all of that Faux-look stuff needs to definitely get off of "my desktop" one way or another!!! Notice I did not degrade it or the people that like it... it's just not for me!

3) Can we agree, that to please both sides of this "personal taste" argument, Apple or a third party like Onyx, MUST add the ability to "mod" or preference change the Lion OS to your liking?

PS. I've "converted" many hundreds more than you have, and to tell ya the truth, there are a number of them in memory that are suspect to having the same point of view as you do. So I better be prepared and careful when these arguments hit me. Thanks for the heads up

And this I can work with. You, having converted many people like I have are likely dealing with people in your immediate family who look to you as their own personal "tech support", just like I have. I've 12 people in my family using Macs, all above the age of 55 (yea baby-boomers). While the direction Lion is taking may be appealing to those working in graphics, or other visual industries, I'm dealing with an aunt who's 68 years old and intimidated by a trackpad, much less gestures. I've just gotten everyone used to the look of buttons in the OS, and now Apple decides that they are going to switch the look of them? That's great for you and I who don't have these issues and don't need significant visual cues, but what about the old people who are going to be looking for the scroll bar that has always been blue and is always right there on the right? Apple seems to have left the older folks behind here, and you know full well that it'll be you answering all of those phone calls. I'll be answering them too.

I agree with you that Onyx ought to allow people to vary things up. If you want to subdue everything, go for it. I also need to be able to walk my relatives through using their Mac's that I've insisted they get, without knowing that everything they are looking at is gray. Believe it or not, they need the "Fisher-Price" look as you put it. I have a grandma that's 89 years old who uses my old Powerbook for email and all things wikipedia. I had to magnify the screen just so she can see the icons (already full size) in the dock. You are likely running into the same issues with people you know. This is something I think needs to be addressed, and I'm not seeing anything encouraging in Lion. As it is, I'm not upgrading anyone in the family with Lion because the visual cues are too different for them.

While there are many on this site who see the death of Aqua as a good thing, I simply don't see it that way. It was a very useful tool for me to explain things, and when everything is the same color, it's not as easy for those who are older and don't see so well anymore to differentiate things like those of us with clear vision. I think Apple is being too aggressive with their elimination of color in the OS and I think it's going to adversely affect the older people far more than the youth who often times don't even pay attention to OS details in the first place.
Fortes Fortuna Adiuvat
Reply
Fortes Fortuna Adiuvat
Reply
post #88 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Ah yes, there is a curmudgeon inside all of us and yours just slipped out. Better if we were still using OS7 graphics, eh?

Apparently Apple thinks so, with all the flat. dull colored folders in OS 10.5. They do remind me of System 7.
post #89 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obi-Wan Kubrick View Post

My only concern is what if I don't know there is an option to scroll down if the blue bar isn't there in the first place?

You can disable the feature but I think it will be fine. The scrollbars aren't on in iOS and it's ok. Apple are adapting the system based on the fact people are used to scrolling now and all have input devices that allow scrolling. I'd expect the invisible scrollbar will popup when your mouse is in the right context.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone

I like gray for the interface. I think all the color should be coming from the content not the interface. Grays and blacks are timeless. Psychologically they represent both power and submission. Whites represent purity and innocence. Bright colors are interpreted differently by different cultures and Mac is global so it makes sense to be neutral. I don't think you should worry about the interface becoming too monochromatic, it will feel natural after you get used to it. I have always set my desktop to gray since I do a lot of color work. That way I don't have any conflicts when designing.

I think so too, the neutral colours won't polarise people to the interface nearly as much so there's less inclination to need to add a theme to it. The brushed metal look really started to annoy me after a while to the point I installed Uno to get rid of it. Even the 3D dock and transparent menu are a bit much as well as the huge drop shadows. The aqua style looks really out of place now.

I think they should also default the menu to the white shaded version and remove the black line between the top of the window and menu - makes me keep thinking the window isn't far enough up, the dock back to the black 2D one and tone the shadows down a notch (not necessarily to the last levels but somewhere in between).

An interesting thing about the App Launcher is that it could actually allow the dock to be removed eventually as they can put the launcher icon in the menu. The Finder icon can move to the Spotlight icon and behave like a single window app and shortcuts would be controlled here as well as with the remaining menu space.
post #90 of 179
@ "Mr" Brian Green

In defense of traditional gray tones in the GUI: in the old days, CRTs and IPS displays developed burn-in. Even today, if you switch fast between apps, you will be left with a perceptible a "color-cast or color-blotch" on the design or picture that you're color-correcting.

Also, unless your using "Application Frame" within Adobe products (or others), background pictures and colors seriously distract, and will influence color choice and correction. Sad to say, but we also work in color neutral environments, due to reflections, etc... so equating it to a hospital, is not so far off.

Last but not least... it is the professional design community that kept Apple alive, before SJ could come back and lead Apple into profit and it's consumer-product led strategy. We like to think that, while we have been left in our "clean-room" environments, to be replaced by the colorful opportunity of wide-spread consumer acceptance, we still are appreciated and catered to once in awhile. It's the little things... like the GUI... that we say "Thank You SJ"
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #91 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

You can disable the feature but I think it will be fine. The scrollbars aren't on in iOS and it's ok. Apple are adapting the system based on the fact people are used to scrolling now and all have input devices that allow scrolling. I'd expect the invisible scrollbar will popup when your mouse is in the right context.



I think so too, the neutral colours won't polarise people to the interface nearly as much so there's less inclination to need to add a theme to it. The brushed metal look really started to annoy me after a while to the point I installed Uno to get rid of it. Even the 3D dock and transparent menu are a bit much as well as the huge drop shadows. The aqua style looks really out of place now.

I think they should also default the menu to the white shaded version and remove the black line between the top of the window and menu - makes me keep thinking the window isn't far enough up, the dock back to the black 2D one and tone the shadows down a notch (not necessarily to the last levels but somewhere in between).

An interesting thing about the App Launcher is that it could actually allow the dock to be removed eventually as they can put the launcher icon in the menu. The Finder icon can move to the Spotlight icon and behave like a single window app and shortcuts would be controlled here as well as with the remaining menu space.

And I see things completely differently. If the OS turned into what you suggested, I'd be taking away my older relatives computers and handing them a pen, paper, and some stamps. I have a hard enough time dealing with everything become monochromatic to the point it has in Snow Leopard. Completely removing the Dock would be too much for far too many people to take. As it is, I doubt I'll find a use for App Launcher because I don't have that many apps on my Mac to begin with. The ones I do use are already in my Dock, so what would be the point of the App Launcher? Spotlight is entirely unused by me, and all of my family as far as I can tell. I dislike it because I can find everything I want through the Finder just as I always have.

If Apple keeps axing things they are going to alienate a lot of the older people who simply more than the minimalism you're suggesting they implement. As it is, my older relatives are struggling with Snow Leopard. I'll not be upgrading them further.
Fortes Fortuna Adiuvat
Reply
Fortes Fortuna Adiuvat
Reply
post #92 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

@ "Mr" Brian Green

In defense of traditional gray tones in the GUI: in the old days, CRTs and IPS displays developed burn-in. Even today, if you switch fast between apps, you will be left with a perceptible a "color-cast or color-blotch" on the design or picture that you're color-correcting.

Also, unless your using "Application Frame" within Adobe products (or others), background pictures and colors seriously distract, and will influence color choice and correction. Sad to say, but we also work in color neutral environments, due to reflections, etc... so equating it to a hospital, is not so far off.

Last but not least... it is the professional design community that kept Apple alive, before SJ could come back and lead Apple into profit and it's consumer-product led strategy. We like to think that, while we have been left in our "clean-room" environments, to be replaced by the colorful opportunity of wide-spread consumer acceptance, we still are appreciated and catered to once in awhile. It's the little things... like the GUI... that we say "Thank You SJ"

Well the good news for you, and everyone else in your profession, is that you're getting your wish. I really do hope you enjoy using Lion. I may upgrade to it for specific features, but I won't admit that I like it and the way it looks.
Fortes Fortuna Adiuvat
Reply
Fortes Fortuna Adiuvat
Reply
post #93 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post

And this I can work with. You, having converted many people like I have are likely dealing with people in your immediate family who look to you as their own personal "tech support", just like I have. I've 12 people in my family using Macs, all above the age of 55 (yea baby-boomers). While the direction Lion is taking may be appealing to those working in graphics, or other visual industries, I'm dealing with an aunt who's 68 years old and intimidated by a trackpad, much less gestures. I've just gotten everyone used to the look of buttons in the OS, and now Apple decides that they are going to switch the look of them? That's great for you and I who don't have these issues and don't need significant visual cues, but what about the old people who are going to be looking for the scroll bar that has always been blue and is always right there on the right? Apple seems to have left the older folks behind here, and you know full well that it'll be you answering all of those phone calls. I'll be answering them too.

I agree with you that Onyx ought to allow people to vary things up. If you want to subdue everything, go for it. I also need to be able to walk my relatives through using their Mac's that I've insisted they get, without knowing that everything they are looking at is gray. Believe it or not, they need the "Fisher-Price" look as you put it. I have a grandma that's 89 years old who uses my old Powerbook for email and all things wikipedia. I had to magnify the screen just so she can see the icons (already full size) in the dock. You are likely running into the same issues with people you know. This is something I think needs to be addressed, and I'm not seeing anything encouraging in Lion. As it is, I'm not upgrading anyone in the family with Lion because the visual cues are too different for them.

While there are many on this site who see the death of Aqua as a good thing, I simply don't see it that way. It was a very useful tool for me to explain things, and when everything is the same color, it's not as easy for those who are older and don't see so well anymore to differentiate things like those of us with clear vision. I think Apple is being too aggressive with their elimination of color in the OS and I think it's going to adversely affect the older people far more than the youth who often times don't even pay attention to OS details in the first place.

Nice post... and your insistence made me think about just those problems and situations heading my way.

While the majority of "my" users are 20's - mid-50s... I have noticed that many of my older clients are starting to do that "chicken-neck-to-the-glass" motion, more often. My personal ability of knowing the OS from the keyboard shortcuts for years, naturally doesn't help when I have to find the Menu or Button equivalent for them.

On both ends of the aforementioned age spectrum, I'm pointing everyone to the iPad since last year.

My theory there is: too old to take the time necessary to learn an OS.. and too young to need to. Touch is here to stay, and it will only get more powerful in time. I hope to see the day when we're all in a virtual Facetime chat room, or truly using a voice-transcriber discussing this stuff. Now wouldn't that be fun... or funny... or _____
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #94 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post

...clip..Completely removing the Dock would be too much for far too many people to take. As it is, I doubt I'll find a use for App Launcher because I don't have that many apps on my Mac to begin with. The ones I do use are already in my Dock, so what would be the point of the App Launcher?

Oh... I don't know about that. The Dock being replaced with a full screen launcher looks like a winner for your users... at least some of them.

Quote:
Spotlight is entirely unused by me, and all of my family as far as I can tell. I dislike it because I can find everything I want through the Finder just as I always have.

Well, I'm not a huge fan of Spotlight either, but LaunchBar and DefaultFolders is installed on just about every machine I come into contact with (many of course at my suggestion and initial installation )... both of which make far better use of the meta data and Spotlight index than does Spotlight itself.

You may want to get used to the fact that in the future, the Finder as it is today will fade into the background and eventually disappear completely, as will the folder/filing structure that we have become used to. It does appear however, according to many a complaint at iOS, that a "folder system" is still wanted and needed in these transitional years.

However, I as well as many people that use the above utilities, have pretty much supplanted the Finder already. I haven't "drilled-down" into folders for years now, nor see or use the Dock for anything anymore. Once I have shown people how fast LaunchBar is to open anything, as long as you know what your attempting to find... they rarely open a Finder window or App the traditional way themselves... and minimize and hide the Dock themselves.

Fact is: I have personally witnessed how non-techies, people with 2 static-loaded left thumbs, and bad Karma to boot (my ex )... can pick up an iPhone or an iPad and use it immediately. Far easier than any tech device I have ever shown them in the past. What makes those devices so easy? NO FINDER and not having to know where you put things, and then later trying too find them. And it's coming to the desktop with Lion. Certainly not for me... but I can see "the others" getting comfortable with it really fast, just like the iDevices.
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #95 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post


...I enjoyed the Dock not being that reflective thing...

Me too. A faux-3D element on the 2D desktop never made sense to me, particularly as I place the dock at the side where it doesn't get in the way. Fortunately a friendly developer feels the same way and has produced Mirage, a little freeware app that allows you to customise it away.
Believe nothing, no matter where you heard it, not even if I have said it, if it does not agree with your own reason and your own common sense.
Buddha
Reply
Believe nothing, no matter where you heard it, not even if I have said it, if it does not agree with your own reason and your own common sense.
Buddha
Reply
post #96 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post

Well the good news for you, and everyone else in your profession, is that you're getting your wish. I really do hope you enjoy using Lion. I may upgrade to it for specific features, but I won't admit that I like it and the way it looks.

See my post above this one. Eventually, most of your family members (casual users) will not even have a Mac with Lion to worry about. Macs will continue to be bought by, and designed for the "pro" users, like you & me, and many other tech-involved industries. It's also why Windows won't just up and disappear.

However it is the "home and casual user" that will more than likely not own a PC at all. These devices will be all they need for "free time" computing.

Hint: take a look at how you're using your Mac today, and give some of the 3rd party devs/utilities a chance at how you could "possibly" work faster and better. You will be a "Post-PC-Desktop-Island-Tech-Support" in short time, so no need to show your family or friends anything on the desktop in the future. Just make it work for them on their i-Devices, as fast and easy as possible.. and quit worrying about the "pro GUI" of Lion. Grandma won't need it... the kids won't want it... and you'll get used to it
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #97 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by tipoo View Post



This looks very...Dull. Windows-ish. Seems like change for changes sake. I guess square buttons might have some teeny tiny bit of increased functionality, but ones that look so drab the blend in to the rest of the screen? Doesn't make sense.

And look at the window function buttons, they look so much more bland as well.

Actually, it looks like a modern version of OPENSTEP, not Windows.
post #98 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by guch20 View Post

It looks so dull and utilitarian now. Like Windows 2000.

This. I think 10.7 is very nice as it is. I understand how 10.2 had some issues with looking too much like a candybar these days, but there's no point in taking the life out of everything. I still get so effing annoyed when I use iTunes now and I have to stare a the new icons so dang long to figure out what they are.
People use color information, and I think it's foolish the remove that.
post #99 of 179
I have a problem with scrollbars appearing only when you move your mouse into the area. The issue is that it makes it less obvious that the zone has more data than it does. Apple needs to ensure that the user experience experts are doing their job, to ensure they don't reduce ease of use.
post #100 of 179
I think taking things too monotone can be problematic for some people. Color can make things look not so homogeneous but at the same time are a good visual reference. About the scrollbars, I totally agree with taking them away: they can ruin a UI very quickly when there's need for them to appear. I guess people will get used to the lack of omnipresent bars really quick as long there's visual feedback about existence of content like it's already being done on iOS.

Just my two cents...
post #101 of 179
Windows 95 all over again.

Mac Pro, 8 Core, 32 GB RAM, nVidia GTX 285 1 GB, 2 TB storage, 240 GB OWC Mercury Extreme SSD, 30'' Cinema Display, 27'' iMac, 24'' iMac, 17'' MBP, 13'' MBP, 32 GB iPhone 4, 64 GB iPad 3

Reply

Mac Pro, 8 Core, 32 GB RAM, nVidia GTX 285 1 GB, 2 TB storage, 240 GB OWC Mercury Extreme SSD, 30'' Cinema Display, 27'' iMac, 24'' iMac, 17'' MBP, 13'' MBP, 32 GB iPhone 4, 64 GB iPad 3

Reply
post #102 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obi-Wan Kubrick View Post

My only concern is what if I don't know there is an option to scroll down if the blue bar isn't there in the first place?

Yes, indeed. That brings a valid point. I think Apple is really making huge mistakes here that raise eyebrows and make you wonder if they lost their mojo.

They seem to be simply blindly (almost literally) carrying over designs and look and feel from a limited 4'' device over onto the desktop without any regard how well do those scale.

Besides small 4'' touch screens are extremely limited and the UI that is adjusted to be usable functional there does not necessarily make sense on a 30'' desktop that is driven differently.

Unfortunately, it always happens. Ah well, Apple had a good decade, they can only go down from here.

Mac Pro, 8 Core, 32 GB RAM, nVidia GTX 285 1 GB, 2 TB storage, 240 GB OWC Mercury Extreme SSD, 30'' Cinema Display, 27'' iMac, 24'' iMac, 17'' MBP, 13'' MBP, 32 GB iPhone 4, 64 GB iPad 3

Reply

Mac Pro, 8 Core, 32 GB RAM, nVidia GTX 285 1 GB, 2 TB storage, 240 GB OWC Mercury Extreme SSD, 30'' Cinema Display, 27'' iMac, 24'' iMac, 17'' MBP, 13'' MBP, 32 GB iPhone 4, 64 GB iPad 3

Reply
post #103 of 179
very subtle and tasteful if you ask me
post #104 of 179
I'm really taken aback, so excuse my 3rd post in a row.

Did anyone notice the divider dot, that let's you know that you can drag the divider? It used to have gloss that made it jump off the sheet, but now without gloss it doesn't even look like a dot or circle, it looks like partially cut off flat oval at best. WTF.

Is this Apple? Seriously? Are they really trying to have a "Vista" of their own?

Mac Pro, 8 Core, 32 GB RAM, nVidia GTX 285 1 GB, 2 TB storage, 240 GB OWC Mercury Extreme SSD, 30'' Cinema Display, 27'' iMac, 24'' iMac, 17'' MBP, 13'' MBP, 32 GB iPhone 4, 64 GB iPad 3

Reply

Mac Pro, 8 Core, 32 GB RAM, nVidia GTX 285 1 GB, 2 TB storage, 240 GB OWC Mercury Extreme SSD, 30'' Cinema Display, 27'' iMac, 24'' iMac, 17'' MBP, 13'' MBP, 32 GB iPhone 4, 64 GB iPad 3

Reply
post #105 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post

I have to say I really like the new look.

Aqua looks quite dated and the round cornered boxes look much nicer.

I'm seriously tempted to buy a Developer license simply to get my hands on and play.

I've seen it on BitTorrent via XTorrent if you are of that persuasion. I have a DL for a different reason and was a bit underwhealmed by Lion. The disappearing bars were annoyingly slow, I liked clicking on-screen arrows for moving through pages, the iOS like app screen felt like a shareware add-on and I am not sure whether i can make itreplace the regular desktop. The new desktop picture is nice, but the new iCal is Ugly.

I think the problem i am having is that I was expecting something exciting with updated features, and Lion feels like a very minimalist shell with barely updated applications.. In hindsight, minimalist is probably a good thing.
post #106 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDW2001 View Post

Overstated much? I like the look. I think too much aqua is dated. Also, I always felt the round buttons looked ironically clunky. I like the rounded corners much better.

I engage in hyperbole to make a point. Guilty as charged on that.

Everything regarding the look of Lion is a matter of opinion. You like the changes, I think they're a huge step backward. Neither of us is right; neither of us is wrong.
post #107 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post

And I see things completely differently. If the OS turned into what you suggested, I'd be taking away my older relatives computers and handing them a pen, paper, and some stamps. I have a hard enough time dealing with everything become monochromatic to the point it has in Snow Leopard. Completely removing the Dock would be too much for far too many people to take. As it is, I doubt I'll find a use for App Launcher because I don't have that many apps on my Mac to begin with. The ones I do use are already in my Dock, so what would be the point of the App Launcher? Spotlight is entirely unused by me, and all of my family as far as I can tell. I dislike it because I can find everything I want through the Finder just as I always have.

If Apple keeps axing things they are going to alienate a lot of the older people who simply more than the minimalism you're suggesting they implement. As it is, my older relatives are struggling with Snow Leopard. I'll not be upgrading them further.



You designed this, didn't you. Nice!
post #108 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Green View Post

The rectangle buttons look more like OS 9 buttons than Apple OS X buttons. So much for thinking different.

We often hear that fashion is making rounds. It is probably this what's happening here. But certainly it did not happen with Windows 7.
post #109 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

So you just sit and look at the UI all day? Don't ya have anything appealing to look at of your own, like pictures or videos or somethin'?

So we get it: minimalism is not your thing. How did ya get attracted to Mac and Apple in the first place?

Certainly their ads, marketing, videos, etc. didn't appeal to you in the least. I mean, B/W Apple logo reversed on B or W background.... videos and ads with NOTHING distracting in the background, products that are "pure design" and the polar opposite of a modded-out Alienware machine...

...are you really one of those people that chose Apple only because it was "cool"? Because obviously you do not subscribe to the "total minimalist aesthetic" that defines the image and brand that is Apple.

Windows 7 will fill everyones life with so much color that people have to use lion for years to remove the stains
post #110 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by guch20 View Post

It looks so dull and utilitarian now. Like Windows 2000.

Yes. The new look is boring, dull and bland.

There should be an option to keep the colour. The new look is soooooooooo backward.
post #111 of 179
I'm pretty happy with these cosmetic changes. Perhaps the idea is to de-emphasize the controls so you can focus on the content.

What bugs me most is how Apple think it's clever to hide controls, but then not give you a way to discover the features of an app. They compound this by not having a keyboard equivalent for every mouse action and a mouse action for every keyboard action. So finding a feature you'd like to have, or browsing what features the app has, means waving the mouse around, pressing random control keys, etc, hoping something will appear.

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

Reply

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

Reply
post #112 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Agreed. The leather, torn pages, and wood have no place in computer GUI.

Likewise, I love my BMW, but fake wood grain accents are just tacky. Didn't wood on coaches go out of style somewhere around the Elizabethan era? You certainly don't see them on Ferrari.

But you know they do focus groups on this stuff and the general population apparently still thinks that fake crap looks deluxe.

Totally agree. When I design UIs on our company system there's a constant call (usually from salespeople) to have a flashier interface, but having brightly coloured controls battling for attention with the content just makes it harder to draw the user's attention to something which is actually important.

I definitely like a modern UI with a bit of eye candy when used in a subtle way - I actually think Windows 7 looks great, at least when used with a restrained colour on the transparent bits. A lot nicer than that awful blue and green interface in XP.

These tweaks are in keeping with the general theme in Lion - with the full screen layouts and lack of scrollbars - in letting the user focus on their content rather than the OS itself, and I like that. There's a bit of inconsistency running through the interface in Snow Leopard and I think Lion will look a lot tidier.

Bear in mind aswell that these are just beta releases, Apple could yet have changes in store for the final version.
post #113 of 179
Apple is taking this "minimalist" approach too far. There is a huge difference between non-obtrusive and minimalist.

iPhone UI needs to be minimalist because there's no space for anything more complex than that. But on a desktop interface, too simple a design will make it less effecient. I sincerely hope Apple will allow people to switch between UI flavors. Otherwise, people may start to think Windows 7 interface is more attractive.
post #114 of 179
One thing they have to be careful of is using shading that is so subtle that tilting the screen on a macbook means the color disappears. This happens to me in iCal, where I have to tilt the glossy screen to avoid lights and then I can't tell which day has the focus.

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

Reply

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

Reply
post #115 of 179
The GUI is not the star, it's the stage.

There was a time when Apple needed to sell OSX to the masses. Now that they are around 15% marketshare and growing, that is no longer the case. The GUI can take a back seat now, and let users focus on the task at hand.

I actually think that Windows' excessive use of color looks gaudy. I'm glad to see Apple going the other direction.
post #116 of 179
Having come from using Lion, I must say that I prefer it's downplayed version of aqua and the scroll bars much better than Snow Leopard's.

Quote:
I have a problem with scrollbars appearing only when you move your mouse into the area. The issue is that it makes it less obvious that the zone has more data than it does. Apple needs to ensure that the user experience experts are doing their job, to ensure they don't reduce ease of use.

This really isn't much of a problem. Like iOS, whenever you go into a list that extends beyond the viewable bounds, the scroll bars appear to indicate that there is an area to scroll. However, unlike iOS, the scroll bars disappear only when you move the pointer out of the list or page, or you leave it idle for a coupe of seconds. I did my best to capture the beheviour in the video below. Sorry about the clipping, Finder didn't like to be recorded, everything moves a lot smoother.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIcD7VZbxUk

You can see how the scroll bars don't appear unless you are currently scrolling, even if you hover over the space where they are hidden. This is because they overlay the content (and in a sense, take up no space, unlike what someone said in another comment).

For those concerned about not being able to see where you are in a list or page without scrolling, I can say that this hasn't been a problem for me. Whenever I am looking to see where I am at in a list, I tend to do it whenever I am already in the process of scrolling. I don't know if this is normal behavior or not, but I noticed that's how I do it.

I've been using Lion for a few weeks now and I must sat that I do prefer the new scroll bars over the old, even though I wasn't too thrilled about them when I started. For those who don't like it or are unwilling to even try them out, there's always an option in System Preferences:

post #117 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Actually, it looks like a modern version of OPENSTEP, not Windows.

Really? Personally I think Lion is starting to look a lot more like Windows.

Then again I've never used OpenStep, so I might not be the best judge.

First here is OpenStep...


And here is a Snow Leopard/Lion comparrison with a mock up of what the same dialog would look like in Win7.





What does anyone else think? Do the changes make Lion look more like Windows or OPENSTEP?
post #118 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

Are you seriously incapable of extrapolating the font list example to other situations? Do you know exactly how long every document, PDF, web page you will ever open is? How about where you are in a zoomed in image or large spreadsheet? Am I in the upper-left or lower-right corner of the picture? Now I'll have to stop my editing work and move the mouse over to the edge of the screen so the scroll bars appear so I can find out where I am.

There is a setting to keep the bar there permanently, but as for arrows, they're gone. I'd like to have an option to return them (but then again, I set my computer to have both arrows on both sides of the computer, 2 on top, 2 on the bottom.

AnonMac
post #119 of 179
It seems that both sides have valid points. I actually like the aqua look, but I may end up liking the lion look once I use it enough. I also have to admit, that although I believe I like Aqua more, I do find myself liking Apple Insider's muted web look. It is pleasing and without many distractions (except for all of the Xoom advertisements.) It would be really nice if Apple allowed us to have the option of keeping the Aqua theme in System Preference if one desires it, but I see Apple's point. They do tend to have a forward vision and I don't think that they will give us that option. I'm just reminding when I occasionally have to use a Windows (XP) machine and I turn on the classic look. YUK.
post #120 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

Really? Personally I think Lion is starting to look a lot more like Windows.

Then again I've never used OpenStep, so I might not be the best judge.

First here is OpenStep...


And here is a Snow Leopard/Lion/Win7 comparrison.





What does anyone else think? Do the changes make Lion look more like Windows or OPENSTEP?

Wow, that's interesting. I use Windows 7 a lot (I have it on Boot Camp), and I print from both OS X and Windows, since one of my printers doesn't work with OS X. You'd think I'd have noticed that by now.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Mac OS X
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac OS X › Inside Mac OS X 10.7: Apple to strip most Aqua gloss