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Inside Mac OS X 10.7 Lion: New dictionaries, multiple word views, multitouch lookups

post #1 of 58
Thread Starter 
Mac OS X Lion adds polish to the bundled Dictionary app, with new dictionaries and an improved multi-pane interface. The system also improves overall dictionary functions with enhanced Spotlight integration and multitouch support for inline text lookups.

New reference files

The Dictionary app in Mac OS X Lion updates its existing "New Oxford American English" dictionary to the third edition of 2010 (current versions use the second edition from 2005).

A new Oxford Dictionary of [British] English is now included, also the third edition of 2010, and a companion British English Thesaurus now joins the American English version.

The Japanese, Japanese-English, and Japanese Synonym dictionaries from Shogakukan are also updated, bearing a 2010 copyright compared to the existing 2006 version. Apple has also updated its own dictionary file, which includes the company's trademarks and product names.



Better app, system integration

The app itself now uses a two pane display, making it easy to reference a list of words, phrases, or Wikipedia entires in alphabetical order, rather than just one definition at a time.



Additionally, definition functions built into Spotlight now popup with a full definition preview, rather than just displaying the first few words.



Lastly, double clicking with three fingers on a selected word in any standard app now brings up the inline dictionary, which formerly required selecting "Look Up In Dictionary" from the contextual menu. A preference setting within Dictionary selects whether the contextual menu command will open the inline mini-dictionary panel or to launch the full Dictionary app.
post #2 of 58
I like that definition integration in Spotlight.

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post #3 of 58
I'm not really sure the "[British]" addition was really necessary for the English dictionary. After all, there's a reason the language is called English.
post #4 of 58
Nice updates!


Quote:
Originally Posted by hdasmith View Post

I'm not really sure the "[British]" addition was really necessary for the English dictionary. After all, there's a reason the language is called English.

Well, if someone's talking about the Mac's English dictionary, (s)he probably means the default one, which is American English. And yes, it originated in England, but its worldwide importance is due primarily to America.
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post #5 of 58
Love that Spotlight popup!

Quote:
Originally Posted by hdasmith View Post

I'm not really sure the "[British]" addition was really necessary for the English dictionary. After all, there's a reason the language is called English.

Speak for yourself. Anyone with exposure to both international/British English and American English could do themselves a favor by garnering a basic understanding of the differences. Even trolls could benefit: I've lost count of how many times some jerk has mocked another in a form for their spelling when the 'spelling errors' were just a different standard of English.

And, you know, there's professionals like editors, writers, etc.
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post #6 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGreatBug View Post

Well, if someone's talking about the Mac's English dictionary, (s)he probably means the default one, which is American English. And yes, it originated in England, but its worldwide importance is due primarily to America.

You're absolutely right. The British empire had nothing to do with the status of English as the world business and political language. After all, the founding fathers of America were considering making German the political language in America.
post #7 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGreatBug View Post

... (English) ... originated in England, but its worldwide importance is due primarily to America.

WTF?! ?????

Even if this wasn't completely inaccurate, it would be insulting, but you've managed to do both.
post #8 of 58
Sorry, I'm a "jerk" and a "troll" for simply pointing out a redundant word? I apologise for being a little fed up of England taking second place to America with regards to her language... and I'm Scottish.
post #9 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdasmith View Post

I'm not really sure the "[British]" addition was really necessary for the English dictionary. After all, there's a reason the language is called English.

"English English Dictionary" might have looked a bit funny

I wonder if all these new dictionaries apple has licensed means iOS will get a dictionary app soon?
post #10 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGreatBug View Post

And yes, it originated in England, but its worldwide importance is due primarily to America.

Someone missed their History classes it seems...

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post #11 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdasmith View Post

Sorry, I'm a "jerk" and a "troll" for simply pointing out a redundant word? I apologise for being a little fed up of England taking second place to America with regards to her language... and I'm Scottish.

I think the issue is to distinguish between colour and color. No hidden agenda here...
post #12 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Lastly, double clicking with three fingers on a selected word in any standard app now brings up the inline dictionary, which formerly required selecting "Look Up In Dictionary" from the contextual menu. A preference setting within Dictionary selects whether the contextual menu command will open the inline mini-dictionary panel or to launch the full Dictionary app.

Inline dictionary exists today, just not with a mouse gesture.
post #13 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

WTF?! ?????

Even if this wasn't completely inaccurate, it would be insulting, but you've managed to do both.

post #14 of 58
Who would win in a fight between UK and the US?

The US is a lot bigger but UK has all the best nerds.
post #15 of 58
Really? And I thought it was because England made 3/4 of the planet an English colony at one time. That is why they speak English in places like India, Australia, Canada, and yes the good old USA. I was unaware of the USA importing English anywhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGreatBug View Post

And yes, it originated in England, but its worldwide importance is due primarily to America.
post #16 of 58
In my experience, British English is more commonly used internationally -- at least in academia.

If you are a writer or editor though, and your employer says you must use a specific variation, the dictionary certainly helps.

I wish America would just drop it and merge with the rest of the world. Like with the metric system they are compelled to be different just for the sake of doing so. Thanks to growing up in the US I have to mentally recalculate measurements when I walk outside, just to make it relative to feet, inches, gallons, etc.

It doesn't help that I am horrible at math, which I would like to also attribute to being born in America -- though that's a stretch.
post #17 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Lastly, double clicking with three fingers on a selected word in any standard app now brings up the inline dictionary, which formerly required selecting "Look Up In Dictionary" from the contextual menu.

Actually, you can activate the inline dictionary by hitting command+control+d. Easy after you've done it a few times.
post #18 of 58
The few different spellings are a minor irritant, but there is one area of potential confusion. If you see the date notated thus: 4/5/11 what is it? For most of the world it is the fourth of May, but for Americans it is the fifth of April. You'd think these things would have been sorted by now.
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post #19 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xian Zhu Xuande View Post

Anyone with exposure to both international/British English and American English could do themselves a favor by garnering a basic understanding of the differences. Even trolls could benefit: I've lost count of how many times some jerk has mocked another in a form for their spelling when the 'spelling errors' were just a different standard of English.

my favorite translator is http://septicscompanion.com/
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post #20 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdasmith View Post

Sorry, I'm a "jerk" and a "troll" for simply pointing out a redundant word? I apologise for being a little fed up of England taking second place to America with regards to her language... and I'm Scottish.

phew. for a minute there i thought you were going to say Welsh.
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post #21 of 58
Will iWork 2011 probably be released this summer with Lion? If so what dictionary improvements do you think will be implemented into it?
post #22 of 58
Quote:
I'm not really sure the "[British]" addition was really necessary for the English dictionary. After all, there's a reason the language is called English.

For people like me this is awe to-the some.
post #23 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrFreeman View Post

I think the issue is to distinguish between colour and color. No hidden agenda here...

You are trying to be funny but yes that probably is part of it. Also the American dictionary probably neglects idiomatic language used in British countries. Such as fag meaning a cigarette and not a homosexual man or queue up rather than line up.

Personally I don't care myself because I have gotten used to not using the dictionary app (as many other Brits likely have) but it is nice to see Apple making an even token gesture if recognization that the US isn't the sum total of the world.


Quote:
Originally Posted by allblue View Post

The few different spellings are a minor irritant, but there is one area of potential confusion. If you see the date notated thus: 4/5/11 what is it? For most of the world it is the fourth of May, but for Americans it is the fifth of April. You'd think these things would have been sorted by now.

Thats why I write it as 4 May 2011. Don't want to confuse the dumb Americans.

"Why did they change the name to the Madness of King George?"
"Guess they were afraid that Americans would wonder what happened in parts 1 and 2"

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post #24 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by bedouin View Post

... It doesn't help that I am horrible at math, which I would like to also attribute to being born in America -- though that's a stretch.

No no - no stretch. At least not if you are British.
post #25 of 58
Still no AirPlay support in QuickTime Player in 10.7 betas for all videos. Apple needs to do a complete AirPlay implementation -- system wide!
post #26 of 58
I hope that Lion includes a Latin dictionary.
post #27 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

Thats why I write it as 4 May 2011. Don't want to confuse the dumb Americans.

I hope youre being cheeky for comedic sake, though I agree that the American way is less natural. I have been using 12-APR-2011 format for years for that reason. Were talking day, month, year in that order.

Ive tried to find out why the smallest of the units was placed between the others but I couldnt find any data on it.

The International Standard Organization writes the date is YYYY-MM-DD (ISO 8601, 1988). This make a lot of sense for a digital age. We should all jump to this format and never look back.

My turn to be irreverent The British have no room to talk about standards when they use MPH for speed while at the same time using KM for distance; weighing people in stones and ounces, and using both F° and C° temperatures depending on whatever value sounds more dramatic.


Quote:
Originally Posted by professorsteve View Post

I hope that Lion includes a Latin dictionary.

Thre are plenty of plugins for Apples Dictionary app.
http://www.apple.com/downloads/macos...ictionary.html
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post #28 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdasmith View Post

I'm not really sure the "[British]" addition was really necessary for the English dictionary. After all, there's a reason the language is called English.

Umm you do realise that Apple never included British English dictionaries don't you? They only gave us American English and all the incorrect spellings that brings.

I for one am really looking forward to this because I hate being forced to spell words the American way when I always use the British way.

You're right though, it is called English because it was developed in England so why America lays claim to being the correct spelling is beyond me.

Stupid illiterate Puritans
post #29 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdasmith View Post

I'm not really sure the "[British]" addition was really necessary for the English dictionary. After all, there's a reason the language is called English.

Geez, everyone's getting their political panties in a bunch. American English, British English, who cares who has more influence or where it originated from...Apple puts titles on them to differentiate, because they are different.

Just as there is traditional Chinese vs. simplified Chinese. Doesn't make one better or worse, but it's sure important to differentiate...
post #30 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post

Umm you do realise that Apple never included British English dictionaries don't you? They only gave us American English and all the incorrect spellings that brings.

I for one am really looking forward to this because I hate being forced to spell words the American way when I always use the British way.

You're right though, it is called English because it was developed in England so why America lays claim to being the correct spelling is beyond me.

Stupid illiterate Puritans

Apple uses the Oxford American Dictionary, which has all the British-ish spellings. They dont remove the British spellings. They dont keep it form being unsearchable. There are less than would be in a British dictionary but not the data is the Oxford American Dictionary.

I dont even know where to start with your comment about being forced to spell words the American way when I always use the British way. In what way does the dictionary prevent you from spelling words the way you choose?
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post #31 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Apple uses the Oxford American Dictionary, which has all the British-ish spellings. They dont remove the British spellings. They dont keep it form being unsearchable. There are less than would be in a British dictionary but not the data is the Oxford American Dictionary.

I dont even know where to start with your comment about being forced to spell words the American way when I always use the British way. In what way does the dictionary prevent you from spelling words the way you choose?

Really? I choose New Zealand as my region and Australian as my keyboard because there is no New Zealand for keyboard.

The DEFAULT language is English and if I use "colour" it underlines it as being wrong. Therefore I am FORCED to change it to British English which is natural for me. There is NO option to set this from the installation process. Even still, some applications do not like it if you remove "English" from the language menu and crash in the process.

"English" is NOT proper English.

Might want to do a little more research before having a go.
post #32 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post

Really? I choose New Zealand as my region and Australian as my keyboard because there is no New Zealand for keyboard.

The DEFAULT language is English and if I use "colour" it underlines it as being wrong. Therefore I am FORCED to change it to British English which is natural for me. There is NO option to set this from the installation process. Even still, some applications do not like it if you remove "English" from the language menu and crash in the process.

"English" is NOT proper English.

Might want to do a little more research before having a go.

1) You wrote "Umm you do realise that Apple never included British English dictionaries don't you? They only gave us American English and all the incorrect spellings that brings.” but are now talking about the system’s Spellcheck.

2) I have no idea about your keyboard and language setups, but it’s irrelevant to a a discussion about the dictionary app.

3) I have no idea what you could mean by '"English" is NOT proper English.’ but it sounds elitist. Language is always changing and what is proper for one field can be inappropriate for another even within the exact same locale. Compare it with communicating with your parents to your children to your significant other to coworkers to close friends to acquaintances to strangers, etc. I certainly don’t use the same language for everyone I encounter.

4) I did do research. Even posted a screenshot of Dictionary showing British variants of spellings.
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post #33 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

My turn to be irreverent The British have no room to talk about standards when they use MPH for speed while at the same time using KM for distance;

The main place in UK that still uses imperial measurements for speed is on the roads. All distances on British road signs are in miles and yards.

Quote:
and using both F° and C° temperatures depending on whatever value sounds more dramatic.

I haven't seen F° in years. Absolutely no mention of it on BBC weather reports by default.

But, yes, I agree with your general point. As someone from a scientific background, I wish that the UK would use SI units exclusively.
post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

The main place in UK that still uses imperial measurements for speed is on the roads. All distances on British road signs are in miles and yards.

I haven't seen F° in years. Absolutely no mention of it on BBC weather reports by default.

But, yes, I agree with your general point. As someone from a scientific background, I wish that the UK would use SI units exclusively.

Officially I’m sure it’s Celsius, but there seemed to be a large number of people that use Fahrenheit, especially in the hotter months where the numeric value would sound more dramatic. Perhaps it’s a regional thing.

It’s not confusing as you know when it’s warm out so if you hear 30°*or 85° in regards to the temp you’ll which scale is being used. Some of the others are closer in scale and have a less obvious reference point that I’d like more universal standards, but I want that for the world at large.

I’d also like to see SI’s 10^x powers of kilo, mega, giga, …, and IEC’s 2^x*10 powers of kibi, mebi, gibi, … be utilized but I don’t see that happening in my lifetime.
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post #35 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdasmith View Post

I'm not really sure the "[British]" addition was really necessary for the English dictionary. After all, there's a reason the language is called English.

Oh, come on, English is spoken around the world, and there are plenty of variations, as if you needed to be told. Color Vs coulor, gray Vs grey, etc, etc.

If you're wanting to say these variations should not exist, fine just say it and be done with it, but don't act ignorant.

Apple is an American company. How many US customers do you think there are Vs UK? So which dictionary should they use?

The obvious answer, though, is that they should use both. It's not like they can't afford it.
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post #36 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8CoreWhore View Post

The obvious answer, though, is that they should use both. It's not like they can't afford it.

In that case I request they include the full version of the Oxford English Dictionary so I can save $295 a year.
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post #37 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Officially Im sure its Celsius, but there seemed to be a large number of people that use Fahrenheit, especially in the hotter months where the numeric value would sound more dramatic. Perhaps its a regional thing.

Its not confusing as you know when its warm out so if you hear 30°*or 85° in regards to the temp youll which scale is being used. Some of the others are closer in scale and have a less obvious reference point that Id like more universal standards, but I want that for the world at large.

Id also like to see SIs 10^x powers of kilo, mega, giga, , and IECs 2^x*10 powers of kibi, mebi, gibi, be utilized but I dont see that happening in my lifetime.

Sometimes they quote Celsius/Fahrenheit on on local radio stations.

I grew up with a mixture of metric / imperial and I'd hate to lose MPH. I once had an Italian motorbike and its speedometer was metric so I used a imperial overlay!
post #38 of 58
Quote:
Lastly, double clicking with three fingers on a selected word in any standard app now brings up the inline dictionary...

I'm still trying to work that one out, let's start with the word "fie" shall we

I'm sure it's right, but ...
post #39 of 58
For me this is a great feature.

It's not just useful, as I need to write good American when working in the US and good English when working in the UK, but it also shows a little maturity from Apple.

Issues such as internationalisation ( I'm in the UK this week ) are important if Apple wants to be taken seriously. The latter means business, academia or any other group of people that want to do something important to a high quality.

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post #40 of 58
With regards to the nationalistic bits above, it's worth keeping in mind that America is Empire 2.0. The end of WWII was the formal handing-over ceremony, with Churchill looking at the USSR and saying "it's up to you now".

The unfortunate part is that European empire ended at a time when Europe had finally learned that war is the ultimate evil, and American dominance took over when America was learning that war makes you rich and powerful. And so history repeats itself.

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