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First-quarter Mac sales grow 9.6% in US as rest of market drops 10.7%

post #1 of 51
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Apple's line of Mac computers saw great success in the U.S. in the first quarter of calendar 2011, growing 9.6 from 2010, while the rest of the American market fell 10.7 percent and netbook maker Acer tumbled 42.1 percent.

Apple earned an 8.5 percent total share of the U.S. PC market, selling an estimated 1.375 million units in the first quarter of 2011, according to research group IDC. Apple's market share was well up from the 7 percent it saw in the first quarter of 2010.

The 9.6 percent growth from Apple well outpaced the market average, though rival Toshiba grew even faster, at 10.4 percent year over year. Apple finished just behind Toshiba, in fourth place in the U.S.

Sales for the top company, HP, slid 2.4 percent from 2010, while Dell sunk 11.8 percent. HP represented 27 percent of sales, while Dell took 23.1 percent.

Coming in at fifth, Acer tumbled a whopping 42.1 percent, garnering an 8.3 percent share of the market with 1.331 million units sold.

Acer and its line of low-cost, low-power netbooks have struggled since Apple introduced the iPad last year. In March, Acer revealed its plans to "overhaul operations" and focus on profit margins rather than market share.



Worldwide, PC sales were down 3.2 percent year over year. HP and Dell were No. 1 and No. 2, respectively as well, though both saw their total sales dip from a year ago. HP commanded 18.9 percent of the market, while Dell took 12.8 percent in the first quarter of calendar 2011.

In the global market, Acer took third, and its 15.8 percent its drop in sales was not as drastic as seen in the U.S. Lenovo came in fourth, garnering 10.1 percent of sales, while Toshiba was fifth at 6 percent.

"The U.S. and worldwide PC market continues to work through a difficult era that we expect will continue into next quarter, but will start to improve in the second half of the year," said Bob O'Donnell, program vice president with Clients and Displays at IDC "Slower than expected commercial growth in the first quarter failed to offset the ongoing challenges in the consumer market. While it's tempting to blame the decline completely on the growth of media tablets, we believe other factors, including extended PC lifetimes and the lack of compelling new PC experiences, played equally significant roles."
post #2 of 51
who, what happened to Acer!?
post #3 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The 9.6 percent growth from Apple well outpaced the market average, though rival Toshiba grew even faster, at 10.4 percent year over year. Apple finished just behind Toshiba, in fourth place in the U.S.

Sales for the top company, HP, slid 2.4 percent from 2010, while Dell sunk 11.8 percent. HP represented 27 percent of sales, while Dell took 23.1 percent.

Coming in at fifth, Acer tumbled a whopping 42.1 percent, garnering an 8.3 percent share of the market with 1.331 million units sold.

Acer and its line of low-cost, low-power netbooks have struggled since Apple introduced the iPad last year. In March, Acer revealed its plans to "overhaul operations" and focus on profit margins rather than market share

Ok, so are these figures including iPad? Cause if we're counting the Netbooks then we should be counting the iPads.
post #4 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

who, what happened to Acer!?

iPad tore it a new one.
post #5 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

iPad tore it a new one.

Yeah. I was wondering what effect the iPad had had on the netbook market. Now I know.
post #6 of 51
...Apple's market share numbers don't include the iPad.
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

iPad tore it a new one.

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post #7 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by hezetation View Post

Ok, so are these figures including iPad? Cause if we're counting the Netbooks then we should be counting the iPads.

No market definition is perfect. This one here is about mouse/trackpad/cursor-driven computers. Apple likely has sold several millions of iPads, if they were included, they might have been number one.
post #8 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

iPad tore it a new one.

Is that a technical phrase? If so, I hope to see it as a headline on the FT front page!

PS. In other news, deliveries of toilet paper to RIM HQ's are up!

PPS. I had to connect my a friend's Window PC to a router a few days ago...Uggh! I felt I was back in 1995 with the clunky XP OS and beige keyboard and mouse. It made me nauseous. I think I can run my whole business with an iPad2 and my iP4!
post #9 of 51
Seeing this chart, you'd have to wonder why Apple's share price is continually dropping. If Apple is pretty much outperforming the rest of the computer industry and not even counting the iPad 2, most would think that Apple is doing rather well on the revenue front. Already there are analysts trying to take Apple shares down further by mentioning "weak" guidance. If Apple is being said to have "weak" guidance then what are the rest of those computer companies guiding. Apple, the company, has continued to perform very well in this economy and there's no reason why it shouldn't continue to perform. So, what's with the "weak" guidance. Will Apple be the only computer company affected by the Japan disaster? I honestly do not understand Apple's recent share performance at all.
post #10 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

who, what happened to Acer!?

I used to have an Acer notebook, back in the day... I remember that the logo was painted on and would start to run when I cleaned the lid. Quality: Acer hasn't it.

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post #11 of 51
Good for Toshiba, assuming they are making decent PCs with a decent profit margins.


Quote:
Originally Posted by hezetation View Post

Ok, so are these figures including iPad? Cause if we're counting the Netbooks then we should be counting the iPads.

While Im sure theyd agree the iPad is upsetting the traditional market, even being responsible for Apples lower YoY percentage increase, they are clear they only include machines with a keyboard/pointer and a desktop OS.

Maybe these tablets will become so important that they get included but so far I havent seen any signs of that.
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post #12 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by noirdesir View Post

No market definition is perfect. This one here is about mouse/trackpad/cursor-driven computers. Apple likely has sold several millions of iPads, if they were included, they might have been number one.

Using the holiday numbers for the iPad we have 7.33 million units we get 8.705 million units. Thats 4.36 million more than HP would now now be at position #2. Its also about 700% growth YoY.
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post #13 of 51
Recent NASDAQ spread restructure may add in some pressures to the stock price. Although Apple is not the only one affected by Japanese supply shortage, but they might be the biggest due to the sales volume. If iPad's production is slowed down for a day, that might be over 10K of sales. If Moto Xoom's production is slowed down for a day, they still have plenty of them in stock cuz no one wants to buy it


Quote:
Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

Seeing this chart, you'd have to wonder why Apple's share price is continually dropping. If Apple is pretty much outperforming the rest of the computer industry and not even counting the iPad 2, most would think that Apple is doing rather well on the revenue front. Already there are analysts trying to take Apple shares down further by mentioning "weak" guidance. If Apple is being said to have "weak" guidance then what are the rest of those computer companies guiding. Apple, the company, has continued to perform very well in this economy and there's no reason why it shouldn't continue to perform. So, what's with the "weak" guidance. Will Apple be the only computer company affected by the Japan disaster? I honestly do not understand Apple's recent share performance at all.
post #14 of 51
Is there any data on market share numbers by revenue instead of by unit volume?
post #15 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by macshark View Post

Is there any data on market share numbers by revenue instead of by unit volume?

The article is from March 23rd, 2010 and the data from 2009 so it’s a little old. The only things we can know is that Apple is making more profit, Acer Dell and HP are making less. I wonder if Toshiba is finally turning a profit again in PC sales.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #16 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Good for Toshiba, assuming they are making decent PCs with a decent profit margins.



While Im sure theyd agree the iPad is upsetting the traditional market, even being responsible for Apples lower YoY percentage increase, they are clear they only include machines with a keyboard/pointer and a desktop OS.

Maybe these tablets will become so important that they get included but so far I havent seen any signs of that.

It'll be interesting to see how they slice and dice the data.

Personally I never understood why "Netbook" became a category by itself. To me it was just a shit laptop!

I think a distinction of things with and things without a keyboard is a pretty sound divide for a category.
post #17 of 51
Over 90% of market is still on Windows/Linux? If so, Apple still has a long way to go.
post #18 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by faxthat View Post

Over 90% of market is still on Windows/Linux? If so, Apple still has a long way to go.

Apple is not focused on dominating PC marketshare. They are pursuing profits.

Apple let others chase after marketshare. Like Acer. Who has now admitted that they were wrong to do so.
post #19 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by faxthat View Post

Over 90% of market is still on Windows/Linux? If so, Apple still has a long way to go.

As an investor and developer it's clear the money to be made is on the fastest growing market.

iOS and OS X.
post #20 of 51
For example Acer certainly is hurting a bit due to the iPad. However I suspect they are hurting a lot more over the new AIRs which are fantastic little machines with features that can't be matched on machines running either Windows or Linux. AIRs fit perfectly between the iPad and the rest of the Mac family.

Contrary to opinions often expressed here Apple isn't ignoring the Mac line up nor the hot selling laptops. Apples laptop line up represents bleeding edge technology at rather decent prices. There is currently nothing on the market that really competes with the new MBPs nor the AIRs. More importantly Apple has a decent OS for these machines unlike the PC world where you wither have a generic Windows variant or a Linux install. (don't get me wrong I'm a long time Linux users but we have to admit that you won't find laptops with Linux integration like is see in Apples products)

So iPad is part of the equation when it comes to the collapse of the netbook market but the real story here is the vast change in public opinion with respect to Mac hardware. The AIR is a vastly better netbook competitor that sucks up what the iPad won't. People see value in buying Mac hardware that fits their needs, something that wasn't the case a few years ago.
post #21 of 51
Apple may have sold as many as 7-8 million iPad computers during this first quarter, so Apple actually grew a lot more than these people are reporting. A LOT more.
post #22 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by faxthat View Post

Over 90% of market is still on Windows/Linux? If so, Apple still has a long way to go.

That should make people feel very good because it means that Apple can continue to grow share at reasonable rates for a long time.

On a side note with the acceptance of Apples hardware/software platform it is about time for them to increase the available model line ups. That is an XMac to start and just as importantly more laptop configurations.

In regards to the laptops Apple needs models with built in 3G GSM networking. Also the plastic Mac Book needs to see a lower price point.

Of course XMac results in a lot of noise on the forums but lets face it the Mac Pro is a dead and dying platform. It is way to big for most users, and is the wrong platform for somebody just needing modest internal expansion. Worst there is no corporate option, that is a platform where iMac isn't suitable.

In the end Apple does have a long way to go. They need more hardware to get there and frankly are slowly addressing that with very attractive machines. There is nothing but upside to these numbers. All they need to do is keep momentum going by keeping the Mac line up fresh.
post #23 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

As an investor and developer it's clear the money to be made is on the fastest growing market.

iOS and OS X.

Hopefully, Mac OS penetration will eventually hit a point where Mac marginalization stops. It's still happening with Macs at 9%. But at what percentage is the Mac OS unavoidable?

Granted, Mac acceptance by web sites and vendors is better now that it was when Macs were at 5-6%. But wouldn't 15-20% make catering to the Mac OS unavoidable? I hope Apple uses some of their profits to achieve that goal.
post #24 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

In regards to the laptops Apple needs models with built in 3G GSM networking.

I think it better to keep that out of the machine. It locks the notebook to a subset of carriers and then Apple would have to deal with supporting multiple telco standards. I'm not a fan of plugging external stuff but a USB modem is still (imho) the best way to deal with this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Of course XMac results in a lot of noise on the forums but lets face it the Mac Pro is a dead and dying platform. It is way to big for most users, and is the wrong platform for somebody just needing modest internal expansion. Worst there is no corporate option, that is a platform where iMac isn't suitable.

The iMac is a totally capable machine for most users. The only thing I hate about it is the inability to change the hard drive without cracking open the entire unit, which could get ugly. I think this also is a deterrence for corporations too. The cost of the Mac Pro for hardcore users in the big picture is minimal considering the kind of work they do that requires heavy-duty horsepower.

However, if Apple incorporates SSD drives similar to the current MacBook Air and relocated the SSD cards to the bottom of the iMac and can be swapped out similarly to how the RAM modules are, and incorporate Thunderbolt ports, then as far as I'm concerned, there is no need to ever have to deal with opening up the machine, except maybe to blow compressed air into it every so often to prevent heating issues.
post #25 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by faxthat View Post

Hopefully, Mac OS penetration will eventually hit a point where Mac marginalization stops. It's still happening with Macs at 9%. But at what percentage is the Mac OS unavoidable?

Granted, Mac acceptance by web sites and vendors is better now that it was when Macs were at 5-6%. But wouldn't 15-20% make catering to the Mac OS unavoidable? I hope Apple uses some of their profits to achieve that goal.

I dont get where youre coming from at all. No one is saying that higher marketshare isnt better but youre focusing on marketshare without any consideration for revenue or profits. As previously noted Acer has put itself in a bad position by only focusing on increased marketshare.

As wizard69 noted they can outgrow the market for a long time to come. This is good for them and investors. Based on the chart I posted and growth since calendar year 2009 Apple could be taking 40-50% of the PC markets profits. Thats where companies need to focus if they want to succeed long term.

As for you r web sites and vendors comment, where is there a void? Apples privately funded and open source WebKit is the most popular browser engine in use today.
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post #26 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

I think it better to keep that out of the machine. It locks the notebook to a subset of carriers and then Apple would have to deal with supporting multiple telco standards. I'm not a fan of plugging external stuff but a USB modem is still (imho) the best way to deal with this.

I think the best way is to use a mini-PCIe card Ã* la the AirPort cards used by previous Mac notebooks. You can buy it installed, install yourself or have a Genius do it the way they install Apple RAM.

This way, even after moving to a Âfull world mode option that is small and efficient the consumer can choose to have orr not have this card installed.
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post #27 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

On a side note with the acceptance of Apples hardware/software platform it is about time for them to increase the available model line ups. That is an XMac to start and just as importantly more laptop configurations.

I expect an iOS-based, HW RAIDed home server solution before Id expect the elusive and equivocal xMac to appear.
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post #28 of 51
Bought the 15" MacBook Pro last month and thouroughly enjoy it. Can't wait for Lion and the Windows Migrator and I can finally say good by to all things PC. I used to be a die hard PC, talking smack about Apple until the 13" MacBook that my wife bought me turned me into a fanboy and I haven't looked back.
post #29 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulfhednar View Post

Apple may have sold as many as 7-8 million iPad computers during this first quarter, so Apple actually grew a lot more than these people are reporting. A LOT more.

If you add 7 million iPads to Apple's numbers it looks roughly like this:

Apple 36%
HP 19%
Dell 16%
Toshiba 7%
Acer 6%

Other 16%

Not bad.

EDIT: Duh. Stupidly added international iPad figures to US sales. Disregard.
post #30 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

Personally I never understood why "Netbook" became a category by itself. To me it was just a shit laptop!

To many of us, the terms were synonymous.

But like many things on the net, the shorter, single word won out.
post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by poke View Post

If you add 7 million iPads to Apple's numbers it looks roughly like this:

Apple 36%
HP 19%
Dell 16%
Toshiba 7%
Acer 6%

Other 16%

Not bad.

Yay! Real numbers! Thank you!
post #32 of 51
I'm certain most readers noted that the figures highlighted first in the AI article were US market only.

Full press release: http://www.businesswire.com/news/hom...-Swaths-Growth

As noted by more than one poster, Apple still appears to garner a much healthier net profit as a percentage of revenue, of course proving market share may be good for bragging rights but no assurance of a healthy bottom line.
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post #33 of 51
was going to post looking for global figures, but as i was asking, Gatorguy was posting a link...
post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by desarc View Post

this is great news for Apple - now i'm wondering what the global figures are...
anyone have a link?

See the previous post to yours for the link.
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post #35 of 51
It's been a lot of fun over the last year to watch the Apple-haters squirm in the face of the iPad. Paul Thurott is the poster child for this. He started off the iPad year pleading with his readers not to buy an iPad. He later insisted that the iPad's sales were trivial and having no effect on PC sales. I can't wait to hear his explanation for Acer...
post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by faxthat View Post

Hopefully, Mac OS penetration will eventually hit a point where Mac marginalization stops. It's still happening with Macs at 9%. But at what percentage is the Mac OS unavoidable?

Granted, Mac acceptance by web sites and vendors is better now that it was when Macs were at 5-6%. But wouldn't 15-20% make catering to the Mac OS unavoidable? I hope Apple uses some of their profits to achieve that goal.

I've got to agree . . . I work in a school district that is all pc. I use my personal macbook at work, but the tech department wants nothing to do with Macs. If I have any tech issues they just blow me off. I hope some day apple will gain enough market share that they will be supported in more environments.
post #37 of 51
urrently, it has to do with the Nasdaq readjusting Apple's shares. Apple used to account for something like 21 percent of the Nasdaq. By the end of the month, Apple shares will account for something like 12 percent.

So all the money managers at mutual funds in the world that track the Nasdaq have to sell roughly eight percent of their Apple holdings regardless of how Apple is doing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

Seeing this chart, you'd have to wonder why Apple's share price is continually dropping. If Apple is pretty much outperforming the rest of the computer industry and not even counting the iPad 2, most would think that Apple is doing rather well on the revenue front. Already there are analysts trying to take Apple shares down further by mentioning "weak" guidance. If Apple is being said to have "weak" guidance then what are the rest of those computer companies guiding. Apple, the company, has continued to perform very well in this economy and there's no reason why it shouldn't continue to perform. So, what's with the "weak" guidance. Will Apple be the only computer company affected by the Japan disaster? I honestly do not understand Apple's recent share performance at all.
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by jarvis8484 View Post

I've got to agree . . . I work in a school district that is all pc. I use my personal macbook at work, but the tech department wants nothing to do with Macs. If I have any tech issues they just blow me off. I hope some day apple will gain enough market share that they will be supported in more environments.

Im not sure why marketshare gets so much play around here. Would your iT department support HP notebooks over Thinkpads simply because they have more marketshare or would they support the HW they are trained and paid to support, likely from the PCs they lease. Id think its the latter.

Apple wont have a high marketshare in business because of their business model. Companies that only used Mac OS X can only use Macs and therefore are at the mercy of Apple for all their purchases. There are no big discounts. There are no roadmaps. There is no letting PC vendors undercut each other to get your business.

This is Apples choice and I dont see them changing it anytime soon. It works great for their profits but it limits their ability to monopolize.
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post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by faxthat View Post

Over 90% of market is still on Windows/Linux? If so, Apple still has a long way to go.

Why do you say Windows/Linux. Their respective numbers aren't close to being the same. Windows share is what? Linux share is what? Lumping them them together makes Linux appear more relevant than it is.
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post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

urrently, it has to do with the Nasdaq readjusting Apple's shares. Apple used to account for something like 21 percent of the Nasdaq. By the end of the month, Apple shares will account for something like 12 percent.

So all the money managers at mutual funds in the world that track the Nasdaq have to sell roughly eight percent of their Apple holdings regardless of how Apple is doing.

Technically correct but also very flawed and misleading.
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