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Review roundup: BlackBerry PlayBook a promising start, but not quite finished - Page 3

post #81 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardik View Post

I understand that I've posted it in different thread, but it was a mistake. I had so many threads ON in different tabs & after realizing it, this thread seemed more related & well conversed so decided to post it again over here with few updates. I hope it's okay.

I am a new here, have been reading AI from years now but decided to participate in forums subsequently later. And it's not a press release. From the given post some members can get impression that I'm a RIM fan but no I'm not. I've always been critical of RIM. Scarcely used blackberry phones, having considered them the least exciting phones in the world.

It's just that iPad enthusiasm, reviews, mouth-to-mouth publicity & popularity is relentlessly giving impression of all other companies Tabs as "Dead On Arrival" (e.g. Slate, Galaxy Tab, Xoom) I know Slate was DOA and each of those had some drawbacks & did not succeed. But sometimes it's affecting in the development of healthy competitive market when we overlook the positive & progressive features of other Tabs.

That's the reason I've decided to point out the optimistic features of PlayBook, Although I am aware of lot of initial level problems with Playbook which can be further trimmed down in upcoming updates & models. There ARE some function oriented issues which should not be there in a Tab on launch.

Anyways, in general as IDC & other analysts predicted that in 2014, 90% domination of iPad can get shrink down to 65% or even further down. WP7 also looks promising as MS have tendency to learn year after year & give out the best copycat product in true entrepreneurial & monopolized way.

Thanks, that's vastly more conversational and sorry to have doubted your sincerity.
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post #82 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardik View Post

It's appropriate to say that hardware upgrading in all three iPs is going uphill but when it comes to development of iOS then it's not going downhill but unsettlingly straight. Especially in light of Android eating away significant portion of smartphone OS market according to IDC & Gartner. But what I am worried about is RIM Playbook OS.

Android is taking marketshare in the cell phone market because of business model, not because of technical superiority of its software.

Google's greatest success was being able to sell Android to carriers and OEMs as the smartphone OS to use. Microsoft and Symbian also conveniently cratered at the same time, so carriers and OEMs basically had no choice if they wanted to compete with Apple.

So, Google did a great job in revving Android and making it good enough for carriers and OEMs. Once it had that buy in, Android was destined to be the dominant smartphone OS. Apple pretty much saw this by early 2009. I guarantee you Jobs probably suspected this by 2008.

In the future, I suspect carriers and OEMs will put the brakes on Android and will try to bring on a 2nd licensed operating system such as Windows Phone 7 or some other thing license-able (Android fork?) so that Google doesn't grow too powerful.

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Apple seriously need to rethink about multitasking now. A year ago they had said "We want to do it right" in terms of consuming minimum amount of battery but variety of burn tests performed on these PPDs show that though the apps are minimized during multitasking, it still drinks up more than little juice from battery. Even I have also observed & measured these on my iPod touch 4G. Plus it's easier & attractive to multi task on RIM OS.

This is basically irrelevant to market dynamics. Think business models, not product feature trades.

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In addition RIM tab has integrated dual core processor with it's first model so most of the apps are designed to take an advantage of dual core.

As you learn more about software, you'll realize the errors in this statement. It's probably fair to say that none of the apps don't really take of dual-core or are even properly multi-threaded. Especially for handheld classes of hardware, there is very pieces of software that really need it, and for a 7" class slate, the opportunities for software to use it get smaller.

Quote:
with Blackberry enterprise, secure corporate data access & window and ability to give out Power point presentations via HDMI plus 4G LTE, HSPA+ support makes Playbook a solid contender in terms of business incorporation & other vertical markets.

RIM will be able to leverage BES to sell Playbooks to the Enterprise? Probably the best sales scenario. We'll see how it pans out.

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When we evaluate the hardware specifications than with 1 GB RAM, 1080p HD video rec., 3/5 f/r cameras, superior codecs for media playback & Micro USB and Micro HDMI ports are all the positive features which are needed in iPad 3 which I doubt not all will appear.

The iPad 2 is a better piece of hardware then the Playbook.

Quote:
Apple needs to be further advanced & to maintain their groundbreaking state-of-the-art iPad status on both Software & Hardware pioneering terms.

Yeah. I'm pretty sure they'll be doing that.
post #83 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrike View Post

Android is taking marketshare in the cell phone market because of business model, not because of technical superiority of its software.

So, Google did a great job in revving Android and making it good enough for carriers and OEMs. Once it had that buy in, Android was destined to be the dominant smartphone OS. Apple pretty much saw this by early 2009. I guarantee you Jobs probably suspected this by 2008.

In the future, I suspect carriers and OEMs will put the brakes on Android and will try to bring on a 2nd licensed operating system such as Windows Phone 7 or some other thing license-able (Android fork?) so that Google doesn't grow too powerful.

Yeah Android's not taking market share because of technical superiority. But when Apple can't change the business model then significant development in iOS is required. Mobile OS evolution timings are reduced. If there was a visible advanced technical development(functionality, uniqueness, brand new innovative features) which could be considered as a milestone in the transition from iOS 3 to iOS 4, than Apple's market share in the smartphone OS could be greater.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrike View Post

This is basically irrelevant to market dynamics. Think business models, not product feature trades.

Product feature development, their ease of use, functionality & uniqueness eventually place devices further ahead in the competition & success. And that affects the model & eventually the dynamics. Product feature trades are as important as business model. (e.g. Zune failed to iPod touch, Slate failed to iPad)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrike View Post

As you learn more about software, you'll realize the errors in this statement. It's probably fair to say that none of the apps don't really take of dual-core or are even properly multi-threaded. Especially for handheld classes of hardware, there is very pieces of software that really need it, and for a 7" class slate, the opportunities for software to use it get smaller.

I am an Electrical Engineer not a Software one. And I made a mistake writing that *most of the apps are designed to take an advantage* it should be *most of the apps will be designed to take an advantage*. But about rest, as I've heard it not all 3000 developers in Appworld can have problems in properly multi-threading the apps. I still can't believe RIM had 3000 developers but still some of apps must be graphically driven & takes the advantage. In App store, from those 65K apps according to requirement of the particular Apps, they will need to write those apps Multi-threaded to take the dual core advantage..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrike View Post

RIM will be able to leverage BES to sell Playbooks to the Enterprise? Probably the best sales scenario. We'll see how it pans out.

In smartphone market RIM was always successful in attracting corporates with their topnotch privacy & security. And still is along with BBM & other business oriented features. Now with PlayBook they are going further steps ahead with BlackBerry Bridge, BES, secure corporate data access & BB mobile to BB PlayBook window & several other business oriented features. We will see how it pans out.

All I've to say is we need to wait & watch for further RIM OS updates & models. Meanwhile I stand firm on my belief that iOS needs substantial revamp.

I have all my hopes on iOS 5. Hope & Faith.
post #84 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardik View Post

Yeah Android's not taking market share because of technical superiority. But when Apple can't change the business model then significant development in iOS is required. Mobile OS evolution timings are reduced. If there was a visible advanced technical development(functionality, uniqueness, brand new innovative features) which could be considered as a milestone in the transition from iOS 3 to iOS 4, than Apple's market share in the smartphone OS could be greater.

Apple isn't playing the "marketshare" game with the phone market. I don't know how many times that needs to be said, but it shall be repeated as many times as possible. Apple is trying to own the premium end of the phone market.

If they wanted more marketshare, they could have simply developed and shipped a $200 non-contract phone that's free on contract. Even then, there are barriers. The cell phone market is gated by the carriers. A phone manufacturer having dominance in such a scenario is pretty far fetched.

And there isn't any feature or functionality that'll give Apple more market-share. As long as they are selling $600 to $700 phones, they aren't playing for marketshare.

Quote:
Product feature development, their ease of use, functionality & uniqueness eventually place devices further ahead in the competition & success. And that affects the model & eventually the dynamics. Product feature trades are as important as business model. (e.g. Zune failed to iPod touch, Slate failed to iPad)

In the cell phone market today, the technology both in software and hardware have reached a commoditization point. OS updates are going to slow down. Hardware improvements will slow down.

In the two examples, Zune failed because of business model: they thought that subscription services were better then selling music. The hardware was basically close enough to each other. For the HP Slate, don't know what to say about a product that really didn't make it market. (Yes, I know it did, but I'd classify that is more of test than anything.) Since it really didn't make it to market, it basically meant they didn't have a go-to-market strategy.

Quote:
I am an Electrical Engineer not a Software one. And I made a mistake writing that *most of the apps are designed to take an advantage* it should be *most of the apps will be designed to take an advantage*.

No. You're still wrong. Most apps will not be designed to take advantage of dual-core in the future. Only niche apps will be. Of the niche apps, most of them probably will be poorly designed for dual-core. After almost a decade of dual-core CPUs on desktops, and decades on multi-CPU configs on workstations to leverage from, applications that can actually take advantage of dual-core or more cores are few and far between.

You think after all this time, it'll just magically happen on tablets? No. Most software problems are not parallel-izable. Of the embarrasingly parallel-izable ones, those aren't a good fit on tablets.

Really, all you got are media encode/decode/compression/decompression apps like iMovie and Garageband. A few games will have AI and other game logic offloaded, but even there, they really aren't using the cores to the fullest.

Quote:
But about rest, as I've heard it not all 3000 developers in Appworld can have problems in properly multi-threading the apps. I still can't believe RIM had 3000 developers but still some of apps must be graphically driven & takes the advantage.

No. I doubt it. Maybe 1 or 2.

Quote:
In smartphone market RIM was always successful in attracting corporates with their topnotch privacy & security. And still is along with BBM & other business oriented features. Now with PlayBook they are going further steps ahead with BlackBerry Bridge, BES, secure corporate data access & BB mobile to BB PlayBook window & several other business oriented features. We will see how it pans out.

If RIM is so strong, why are they losing market-share to Android? It can't be all consumer sales right? If RIM is so strong, why is Apple now shipping more iPhone devices than RIM is selling phones? And Apple is selling them for basically twice the price.

Quote:
All I've to say is we need to wait & watch for further RIM OS updates & models. Meanwhile I stand firm on my belief that iOS needs substantial revamp.

I have all my hopes on iOS 5. Hope & Faith.

It'll be iterated. But that's like stating the Sun will rise tomorrow in the East. Even if there is some super-duper magic cloud technology in it, it won't pull Apple ahead of Android in the cell phone space.

The tablet space is still up in the air as it is uncertain what the market dynamics are. If it is a large market, 500 million unit strong, it will be pretty certain for Apple to drop in marketshare quite a bit.
post #85 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I have an innate desire to steal his lunch money.

OH...Oh..Oh...:lol
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post #86 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrike View Post

Apple isn't playing the "marketshare" game with the phone market. I don't know how many times that needs to be said, but it shall be repeated as many times as possible. Apple is trying to own the premium end of the phone market.

And there isn't any feature or functionality that'll give Apple more market-share. As long as they are selling $600 to $700 phones, they aren't playing for marketshare.

They could have developed a $200 contract free iPhone, and I agree that in smartphone segment lot of factors are confined by the carriers. But Apple have looked in to the possibility of making a $200 iPhone. Plus 7-inch form factor has it's own virtues. We shouldn't be surprised if they launch a big iPod touch in future. May be they are waiting for ideal time & cost cut downs on touch panes & chips. There has been lot of analysts & suppliers predictions-manufacturing hints regarding this.

It's just that for reviewing my intent was to point out all positive, optimistic & promising features of PlayBook and you are watching it as business, market share & dynamic trends point of view. Both are appropriate. Since we are into that, I would have to say there are lot of there are lot of different companies phones in premium segment.

Even if we compare Samsung Galaxy S2 with iPhone 4 than I'd say that gingerbread phone has better form factor-thin & far more substantial features with super AMOLED plus display. When iPhone 5 will be released in the last months of 2011 & even that is not confirmed as Apple's playing cards really closed we need to consider it. May be Apple's business model is different but as they have explored in to smaller phone & tab, they are aware of their market share.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrike View Post

In the cell phone market today, the technology both in software and hardware have reached a commoditization point. OS updates are going to slow down. Hardware improvements will slow down.

Cell phone market has commoditized. There're healthy competitions, and smartphone is being seen as simple commodity. But the companies will earn maximum profits on their s/w & h/w only. Improvements won't slow down. Generating maximum revenue will compel them to do that. Now-a-days motto is create a necessity. And users will want that 'necessity'. Years ago cell phone came without cameras, 3G, 4G, retina display & smartphone OS but once those functions came they became necessity.

Tablet is the example of that. You can perform the same functions on Mac but companies created the third category to do it little differently. Even if we just focus on Apple then in hardware they currently have iPad retina, Fringe field switching (FFS), shrinking of 3.5 mm jack with flexible jacks, more GHZ/RAM/Memory/MegaP & Form Factor etc in their sleeve. In software they're going strongly with deep cloud integration, NFC, window of app between Mac & PPDs, different cover flow techniques etc. We can mention a lot from their recent patents. They think of 5 years ahead models with the features & support need in both s/w & h/w.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrike View Post

Really, all you got are media encode/decode/compression/decompression apps like iMovie and Garageband. A few games will have AI and other game logic offloaded, but even there, they really aren't using the cores to the fullest.

Apart from technicality, niche apps will increase the importance of tablets & smartphones. Sometimes I wonder, like how many apps we generally use for real life implementations? That implementation will yearn the true meaning of smartphones & tablets.

Using NFC via iPhone, Autodesk apps, Adobe photoshop, Office etc. Even I use Nike+ sensor with Nike+ app. That feels like real life employment. In next 5 to 10 years I predict that the apps will eventually become more real life oriented, even takes the advantage of quad-core. That's where smartphones & tablets will actually become the real life advantage in its sense putting us out from the virtual world by serving us better.
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