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Mac OS X 10.7 Lion: new multitouch gestures, Dock integration for Exposé, Launchpad, Mission Control

post #1 of 53
Thread Starter 
Apple has already demonstrated a variety of changes on the way for Mac OS X Lion's Dock, Dashboard, Exposé, and Spaces, but there are a variety of interesting details about how these components will work together, and how new multitouch gestures will make them effortlessly available.

One of the biggest new features of Mac OS X Lion is the rethinking of how Dashboard, Exposé and Spaces work. These features, originally added to Mac OS X 10.3 Panther, 10.4 Tiger and 10.5 Leopard, respectively, are now being freshly presented in Lion with a direct influence from iOS.

A previous report on the new Dock, Finder and Desktop outlined some of the iOS-influenced changes Apple will be making in Lion, which mirror the upward borrowing of features that has occurred between iPhoto and Aperture, as well as iMovie 6 and the new Final Cut Pro X.

The iOS redesign of Mac OS X

In particular, Dashboard is being transformed from a nebulous widget layer that appears above the Mac desktop into a utility area that slides in from the left of the desktop, much like the iOS controls that slide in from the left of the multitasking bar to present volume, brightness, audio playback controls, and a screen orientation lock.

Secondly, Exposé is being made more accessible. Rather than having four Exposé modes (tile all windows, tile windows of one app, hide all windows to show desktop, and show Dashboard) invoked by key commands or mouse buttons, Lion improves upon Snow Leopard's multitouch gestures to make tapping into Exposé even easier.

In Snow Leopard, Apple made Exposé's F9 "all windows" mode accessible with a 'four fingers down' trackpad gesture, and the F11 "hide all windows, show desktop" mode available with 'four fingers up.' The same gesture when made right or left invokes the App Switcher. The company is experimenting with similar gestures for iOS.

Lion takes this a step further by renaming and enhancing Expose's F9 "all windows" mode under the new moniker Mission Control, which further integrates Spaces and Dashboard, showing both all open windows and all alternative desktops (including Dashboard) within any parallel Spaces being used.



Changes in Lion System Preferences

As part of a trend that appears to feature multitouch gestures over mouse button clicks, the Exposé panel of System Preferences now presents a single hot key menu for each function (set by default to F9, F10, F11 and F12), with a list of options that no longer include invoking the various Exposé modes with the secondary or middle mouse button. Gestures for invoking Exposé features can be configured from the Trackpad pane.



An additional option has been added to the Active Screen Corner menus which now lets users invoke Launchpad from one of the corner hotspots.



Additionally, Spaces is no longer an "expert" feature that must be turned on manually. In Lion, it's always on, and made more accessible to novice users though the iOS-like use of Full Screen Apps, which take up an entire Space. So rather than juggling a variety of virtual desktops (an idea that is often confusingly complex, particularly for less technical users), Spaces is now a very visual tool for moving between a number of Full Screen Apps, much more akin to the iPad.



Power users can continue to manage multiple Spaces configured with specific apps, and more easily switch between them using Mission Control. But even users who have a hard time conceptualizing different virtual desktops can now take multiple apps (such as Mail, Safari, Preview, iCal, and so on) Full Screen and easily swap between them, just as one might jump between iOS apps running in the background.

On page 2 of 3: New multitouch gestures in Lion: 2 finger F10.

New multitouch gestures in Lion: 2 finger F10

Apple has also made it easier to access these functions, using intuitive new multitouch gestures. The first is a two fingered upward swipe on a Dock icon, which now invokes the F10 "app windows Exposé," displaying that app's windows currently on the desktop and presenting smaller proxies of its currently Dock-minimized windows.

For some apps, this gesture works even when the app isn't running. There's no way (and no sense) in invoking F10 for an app that isn't actively running, but in Lion, a two finger swipe up on certain Dock icons (such as Preview) shows recently opened files, even when the app isn't running.

When launched, Lion's F10 shows the app's active and Dock-minimized windows, as well as this new row of recent documents you might want to open again (as is visible below for Preview, which has one window open and shows several recent documents below it).

This new feature is not presented anywhere in the interface, including the Dock System Preferences pane, but works even on older machines with limited multitouch capabilities.



This new gesture replaces the "mouse click and hold" method of invoking the same thing. In Lion, a click and hold on a Dock icon brings up its standard contextual menu (identical to control clicking), with one new option to "Show All Windows," a manual method of invoking the same thing as the two finger swipe or an F10 key press.



On page 3 of 3: New multitouch gestures in Lion: 3 & 4 fingers.

New multitouch gestures in Lion: 3 & 4 fingers

Apple has also reconfigured three and four finger gestures in Lion (which do require a newer trackpad capable of registering more than two fingered touch points).

Previously, three fingered gestures were used to drag windows without having to click on them (although this only worked when targeting the window's menu bar). A secondary option allows for multitouch navigation (such as swiping between album photos).

Both of those previous options are still there in Lion, but the default option for three finger swipes now invokes F9 Mission Control when made upward, or F10 single app windows Exposé when made downward.



When made side to side, three finger swipes pull in Dashboard from the left, or swipe through active Spaces to the right (including any active Full Screen apps). Each Space smoothly animates in from the right or left (shown mid-swipe, below).



Four fingered swipes formerly invoked F9 upward and F11 show desktop downward. The default setting in Lion developer builds now sets four finger swipe to the same settings as three fingers, described above. Also, the four finger swipe side to side in Snow Leopard formerly brought up the App Switcher, but now it swipes in Dashboard or Spaces, a faster way to rapidly move between open, Full Screen apps.

Another new four finger gesture actually works best with five fingers: pinching all your fingers together now invokes Launchpad, the new Mac analog of the iOS Home page of launchable app icons. Expanding your fingers back out dismisses Launchpad and returns you to the desktop. From the desktop, spreading four or five fingers out performs an F11 "hide all windows/show desktop."

All of these gestures feel more intuitive and sensible, but it's not clear why three and four fingered gestures are set to perform the same task (although both can be reconfigured to perform different tasks to the preference of the user; this wasn't the case in Snow Leopard).
post #2 of 53
Love the way Spaces works in Mission Control but I wish I could rename the Desktops.
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post #3 of 53
I've been using four-finger swipe to change Spaces for weeks (via BetterTouchTool), it's very useful.
post #4 of 53
Five finger controls?! Isn't the touchpad getting a bit crowded with four?
post #5 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by bartfat View Post

Five finger controls?! Isn't the touchpad getting a bit crowded with four?

byt steve said that the touchpad was magic! if its magic it can make 5 fingers feel great on there!
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post #6 of 53
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #7 of 53
My question is how does Spaces, and Launchpad work with multiple displays?

I like to have one application (NetNewsWire) always in my left display (all spaces), while my right display changes depending on the space (web space, email space, music space, development space, misc. space).
post #8 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Love the way Spaces works in Mission Control but I wish I could rename the Desktops.

Great idea! I hope they also allow us to configure apps to only open documents in their assigned spaces.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

God that Dashboard background is awful.

Agreed! The folder backgrounds in iOS is better. Maybe, they'll make the Mission Control background user customizable.

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post #9 of 53
No matter how much Apple, or Jobs himself denies it, I think it's pretty obvious that all of these gestures aren't solely mean for a trackpad. This is definitately leading to a touch enabled iMac, or possibly a monitor.
post #10 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeadParrot View Post

My question is how does Spaces, and Launchpad work with multiple displays?.

I was checking out Lion and I'm afraid as things stand, they don't work well with multiple monitors at all. For example, if you put an app into full-screen mode, and you have more than one monitor, the second monitor gets covered by a useless blank image that looks a little like cloth. Really, you'd want a separate space on each monitor, but then how would you pick which was the target of your 'switch space' command? Why not at least put the Finder in the second monitor so you could drag files into the full screen app? Whatever. These multi-touch gestures seem useless and obscure on a desktop machine. How are users ever supposed to discover them? I like the "two fingers to scroll" thing, but that's about it. I also find Exposé to be too visually disorienting. I actually like AeroPeek a lot better... which is weird because usually Windows seems like a bad Mac copy.
post #11 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

No matter how much Apple, or Jobs himself denies it, I think it's pretty obvious that all of these gestures aren't solely mean for a trackpad. This is definitately leading to a touch enabled iMac, or possibly a monitor.

Kiosking will be a neat way to go, if apple can build a industrial strength iMac/Monitor.

As for Jobs... my guess is he's playing Apple's cards close to the vest (like videos on an iPod, or a phone, or a tablet). There is no reason not to move to a touch screen interface... fully eliminating the mouse/trackpad intermediate experience (It's more natural to touch a screen than it is to manipulate a mouse... easier to learn, and faster to master). The trade offs are the ergometrics, and most of that would be de-evolving from the 'computer workstation' mode to the 'human workstation' mode.

Moving to a standing workstation with a keyboard and a 24" touch screen at a 30% to horizontal plane moves so much closer to the drafting table that most designers prefer to work at anyway (think of apeture on a 46" 'lightbox'... I'm getting all randy;-))

But it opens up the pandora's box of 'multi-hand gestures' ('measure this distance', 'link these objects'), because the workspace is so huge.

but it's definitely a matter of when, not if. Apple will go there when the market is right, and the economics are right. No one is going to buy a 24" iMac with an integrated touch screen for $3000. When they can do it for $999/1099, then it will be done.
post #12 of 53
that click and hold thing on dock icons for showing windows sucked from day 1. Never really use it, and I would wager not many do.
post #13 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

Kiosking will be a neat way to go, if apple can build a industrial strength iMac/Monitor.

As for Jobs... my guess is he's playing Apple's cards close to the vest (like videos on an iPod, or a phone, or a tablet). There is no reason not to move to a touch screen interface... fully eliminating the mouse/trackpad intermediate experience (It's more natural to touch a screen than it is to manipulate a mouse... easier to learn, and faster to master). The trade offs are the ergometrics, and most of that would be de-evolving from the 'computer workstation' mode to the 'human workstation' mode.

Moving to a standing workstation with a keyboard and a 24" touch screen at a 30% to horizontal plane moves so much closer to the drafting table that most designers prefer to work at anyway (think of apeture on a 46" 'lightbox'... I'm getting all randy;-))

But it opens up the pandora's box of 'multi-hand gestures' ('measure this distance', 'link these objects'), because the workspace is so huge.

but it's definitely a matter of when, not if. Apple will go there when the market is right, and the economics are right. No one is going to buy a 24" iMac with an integrated touch screen for $3000. When they can do it for $999/1099, then it will be done.

Considering that they now have two patents for a sliding, bending monitor/computer stand specifically for this purpose, I imagine that this is being researched carefully. The fact that HP has already put one out for sale shows that Apple isn't the only one thinking this.

I would buy a high quality high Rez 27" monitor for use with my Mac Ro, and I know others who would do the same. It wouldn't have to be an inexpensive product at first.
post #14 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by graxspoo View Post

I was checking out Lion and I'm afraid as things stand, they don't work well with multiple monitors at all. For example, if you put an app into full-screen mode, and you have more than one monitor, the second monitor gets covered by a useless blank image that looks a little like cloth. Really, you'd want a separate space on each monitor, but then how would you pick which was the target of your 'switch space' command? Why not at least put the Finder in the second monitor so you could drag files into the full screen app? Whatever. These multi-touch gestures seem useless and obscure on a desktop machine. How are users ever supposed to discover them? I like the "two fingers to scroll" thing, but that's about it. I also find Exposé to be too visually disorienting. I actually like AeroPeek a lot better... which is weird because usually Windows seems like a bad Mac copy.

It's possible that the feature isn't finished yet. What you describe sounds pretty odd for an Apple product. It seems too much of an oversight.
post #15 of 53
"with a list of options that no longer include invoking the various Exposé modes with the secondary or middle mouse button."

No, no, no. That's how I use Expose. It's fast, it's certain, and it doesn't slow me down to hunt for one of those tiny F-keys.

Hopefully, Apple will put this back into the shipping Lion.
post #16 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

No matter how much Apple, or Jobs himself denies it, I think it's pretty obvious that all of these gestures aren't solely mean for a trackpad. This is definitately leading to a touch enabled iMac, or possibly a monitor.

Support for third party multitouch displays would be nice.
post #17 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeadParrot View Post

My question is how does Spaces, and Launchpad work with multiple displays?

After 25 years, will Mac OS finally do something about only being able to access the menu bar on the main display?
post #18 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkling View Post

"with a list of options that no longer include invoking the various Exposé modes with the secondary or middle mouse button."

No, no, no. That's how I use Expose. It's fast, it's certain, and it doesn't slow me down to hunt for one of those tiny F-keys.

Hopefully, Apple will put this back into the shipping Lion.

Since they launched the magic trackpad, I have the feeling that they are trying to get rid of the mouse as main pointing device. (the mouse would be a secondary pointing device for when needed in some applications like a 3D mouse or a gamepad).
post #19 of 53
Sounds like my 2009 W. Macbook isn't going to get much, if any multitouch love :-( . Guess I'll need to purchase a Magic Trackpad...
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post #20 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

Kiosking will be a neat way to go, if apple can build a industrial strength iMac/Monitor.

As for Jobs... my guess is he's playing Apple's cards close to the vest (like videos on an iPod, or a phone, or a tablet). There is no reason not to move to a touch screen interface... fully eliminating the mouse/trackpad intermediate experience (It's more natural to touch a screen than it is to manipulate a mouse... easier to learn, and faster to master). The trade offs are the ergometrics, and most of that would be de-evolving from the 'computer workstation' mode to the 'human workstation' mode.

I don't mean to be a Scrooge but there was actually a recent statement from Apple saying that they have played with touchscreen iMac-type computers but the use of a large multi-touch pad perpendicular to the display is much more ergonomic. It would also require that Apple completely re-design the OS to be touch-friendly. That would mean 3 OS's. A fully mobile touch interface (iPad/iPhone), a touch interface that still contains the complexities of a full OS (purported touch-iMax) and the non-touch OS like on MacBook Pros. There would be WAY too much confusion for the common user. Also, such a device would cause confusion for consumers on which to buy, an iPad, TouchMac or Mac. Apple seems to love a well-defined line between their products so that you will buy ALL of them. A Mac for home, an iPad for the bus and and an iPhone for everything else.
post #21 of 53
I want to see more Magic Mouse love.

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post #22 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by kohelet View Post

Sounds like my 2009 W. Macbook isn't going to get much, if any multitouch love :-( . Guess I'll need to purchase a Magic Trackpad...

A Magic Trackpad to supplement an old laptop trackpad? Hmmm

On my wish listis a detached keyboard with an integrated trackpad for an iMac. Then, the Magic Mouse would serve as the supplemental precision pointer!

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post #23 of 53
I don't have a tech blog to post these things on, so I'll just put my thoughts here and we can all debate about the validity thereof.

Regarding Mission Control:

I've noted from videos, what I believe is a significant flaw in the UI design for Mission Control.

With spaces enabled, Mission Control displays a list of available spaces with thumbnails of open windows in them, while at the same time also displaying Exposé views of the same windows. This results in two proxies for the same thing on the screen at one time - an Exposé window, and a Spaces thumbnail. I think there should never be two on screen proxies for a single element at any time, especially when in this case, a Thumbnail is easily confused for a minimized Window. (I'm talking conceptually here, which is what UI design is all about).

Furthermore, it appears to support dragging and dropping across the two contexts, from Exposé into a Space, wherein the window shrinks down to the size of a thumbnail (note that as this happens, there are two thumbnails for the same window) before it is dropped.

This visual shrinking of the window (usually a cue for minimizing) is jarring, because it denotes a change of mode (from Window to Thumbnail) even though no such mode change is actually taking place.

I do not have any solutions for what I perceive will be a problem, but I hope Apple designers are aware of this, and work to solve it before the release.

Regarding Dashboard:

Also, I don't like how they're giving Dashboard its own space in an environment where fullscreen apps get their own space (I think that's awesome) because that causes Dashboard to feel conceptually like another app, which isn't what it is - it's a space for mini apps, not a large app - I believe it also detracts from the Heads up Display concept it currently employs (to great effect too).

Regarding gestures:

Personally, I map 4 finger gestures to system scope commands like Exposé (swipe down), Show Desktop (swipe up), Change Spaces (swipe left/right), and Dashboard (click).

3 finger gestures application scoped, for example in Safari, Back and Forward (3 finger left/right) or next/previous tab (3 finger up/down), or Open in New Tab (3 finger click).

2 finger gestures are reserved for context sensitive commands, like scrolling and zooming.

I believe such clear delineation of scope for multi touch controls results in orderly and predictable modes of control - making this the system default, as opposed to the rather arbitrary gestures currently implemented would result in a far more usable and discoverable interface.

(I understand that the settings can be remapped, but know that the default system setting plays a huge part in determining how the average user will end up using the computer.)
post #24 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post

After 25 years, will Mac OS finally do something about only being able to access the menu bar on the main display?

If an app displays all its windows on a separate monitor, there is no reason not to display that app's menu in that space.

The thing is that the feature you are requesting is only maturing now. In Lion it may become a natural to have multiple menus showing (when appropriate).
post #25 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

No matter how much Apple, or Jobs himself denies it, I think it's pretty obvious that all of these gestures aren't solely mean for a trackpad. This is definitately leading to a touch enabled iMac, or possibly a monitor.

By Apple, after other(s) failed.

The question remains, will Apple be able to market such a big touch-sensitive display at prices within reach of the average customer? (MS's big-ass table costs an arm and a leg and only seems to exist so they can lure TV news desks into buying one).
post #26 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

No matter how much Apple, or Jobs himself denies it, I think it's pretty obvious that all of these gestures aren't solely mean for a trackpad. This is definitately leading to a touch enabled iMac, or possibly a monitor.

You understand that this makes NO SENSE by the laws of physics and the laws of physiology, right?

We, humans, CAN'T USE a touch monitor for desktop work --it gets tiring to hold your hand up very very shortly.

This cannot change. So, no. The gestures are for the trackpad and the touch mouse solely, and they will remain so. The only other option is a future Mac tabled/desktop hybrid.

But no touch iMac or monitor, ever. I mean, duh!
post #27 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by colinstalter View Post

I don't mean to be a Scrooge but there was actually a recent statement from Apple saying that they have played with touchscreen iMac-type computers but the use of a large multi-touch pad perpendicular to the display is much more ergonomic. It would also require that Apple completely re-design the OS to be touch-friendly. That would mean 3 OS's. A fully mobile touch interface (iPad/iPhone), a touch interface that still contains the complexities of a full OS (purported touch-iMax) and the non-touch OS like on MacBook Pros. There would be WAY too much confusion for the common user. Also, such a device would cause confusion for consumers on which to buy, an iPad, TouchMac or Mac. Apple seems to love a well-defined line between their products so that you will buy ALL of them. A Mac for home, an iPad for the bus and and an iPhone for everything else.

Steve Jobs has always made tricky statements that require some reading in between the lines. This is a great article explaining some misleading quotes he's made in the past. http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/02/steve-jobs/

As for his statement about iMacs- imagine a stronger and more extendable version of the iMac G4, such that you can pull the display down to just above desk height, and face it upwards like a surface. Suddenly the ergonomics issue vanishes.

You'd be a bit of a fool not to realize that the reason Lion is *looking* more touch friendly, and behaving much more like an iPad is no accident. I must also say Final Cut Pro X looks touch friendly, as well.

I wouldn't put it past Apple to figure out a way to lay out a touch desktop experience that is simple as pie.
post #28 of 53
sorry, but the different mouse gestures get too confusing. i know people who can't even learn the four fingers swipe for expose. it is also a stupid idea to focus on such gestures as the typical mac/mac mini/imac user uses the mighty/magic or normal mouse, and it is a pain in the arse to make such gestures there!

also i think that a program should immediately get his own spaces-screen when in fullscreen mode and shall NOT go back when accidently clicked the ESC button. and oh, please: I WANT FULLSCREEN PHOTO VIEW WITHOUT USER INTERFACE IN IPHOTO!!!!
post #29 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by bodypainter View Post

sorry, but the different mouse gestures get too confusing. i know people who can't even learn the four fingers swipe for expose. it is also a stupid idea to focus on such gestures as the typical mac/mac mini/imac user uses the mighty/magic or normal mouse, and it is a pain in the arse to make such gestures there!

I don't think the macs will be delivered with a mouse for much longer anymore..

And most of mac users use a macbook, with a trackpad...
post #30 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post

After 25 years, will Mac OS finally do something about only being able to access the menu bar on the main display?

buy an ipad. there is no such menu bar anymore.
post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Changes in Lion System Preferences

As part of a trend that appears to feature multitouch gestures over mouse button clicks, the Exposé panel of System Preferences now presents a single hot key menu for each function (set by default to F9, F10, F11 and F12), with a list of options that no longer include invoking the various Exposé modes with the secondary or middle mouse button. Gestures for invoking Exposé features can be configured from the Trackpad pane.

WTF?!? For someone who doesn't use the Magic Trackpad (like me) that's a HUGE step back!
post #32 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by BertP View Post

A Magic Trackpad to supplement an old laptop trackpad? Hmmm

On my wish listis a detached keyboard with an integrated trackpad for an iMac. Then, the Magic Mouse would serve as the supplemental precision pointer!

If they are driving the Touch Interface they better damn well include the bluetooth glide pad for everyone who buys a Mac Mini, iMac or Mac Pro.

Otherwise, expecting people to fork over another $69 for the magic trackpad to work with your vision I share is absurd.

Being left-handed though I use a mouse in my right hand I foresee the left-hand using the magic trackpad for the complex touch actions and the magic mouse for the precision work. But to not include both in the purchase of a new Mac to leverage these new features would be a hidden $69 to the cost of the OS.
post #33 of 53
Yeah I'm sorry but this Lion stuff is starting to look like a clusterf**k. Multitouch works different on Macs because you are not actually touching what you are seeing.

Let me repeat that. You touch a surface, which you then have to coordinate with what you see on a separate screen. Very different from iOS.

Apple is trying hard to bring everything great about iOS "Back to the Mac" indeed. But I think Lion will end up a little more convoluted than it should be and perhaps there is a big division between the OSX and iOS teams... This is a tough one to sort out.
post #34 of 53
Am I right that Lion creates a new space when an app goes full screen, and removes it when the app goes windowed again?

That seems pretty neat.

BTW all this indeed promises a lot for iOS 5, or 6.
post #35 of 53
Gestures work best, and remain reasonably intuitive, when you keep the number really small. Apple started off great with this but seem to have lost their sense of taste.

Two fingers means scroll - just leave it at that. There's nothing intuitive about a 2 finger gesture on an icon raising expose for that app. It's like an episode of Geeks Gone Wild.

Keep it simple - if you click on an app in the dock that is not running, it can start. If it's already running, then it can show you the active windows like Stacks does - consistent. Simple things done well, would win the day.

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post #36 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Yeah I'm sorry but this Lion stuff is starting to look like a clusterf**k. Multitouch works different on Macs because you are not actually touching what you are seeing.

Let me repeat that. You touch a surface, which you then have to coordinate with what you see on a separate screen. Very different from iOS.

Apple is trying hard to bring everything great about iOS "Back to the Mac" indeed. But I think Lion will end up a little more convoluted than it should be and perhaps there is a big division between the OSX and iOS teams... This is a tough one to sort out.

I'm afraid I agree. Apple did an immaculate job with the iPhone and it was what persuaded me to go iPhone, MobileMe and then switch to a Mac.

But Apple has not matched that quality of interaction on OSX and I think they are stuck. They need to sit back and think it through again. Look at the special keys on the bottom left of the keyboard, they don't have any meaning anymore - control clicks are not more controlling, the command key is not commanding, it's all a mess. The same applies with navigation - a 3 key combination for page down, etc. And there is little parallel between features accessible by keyboard and by pointer - you have to switch between them. I think they are transposing from iOS to OSX because they can see something is not right on OSX but they can't see what it is.

Instead of doing all these whacky things and talking about people needing cars instead of trucks, they just need to think it through and give us good, flexible, re-usable features, well-presented. At this point, I don't think it's even that difficult to improve.

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post #37 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

Kiosking will be a neat way to go, if apple can build a industrial strength iMac/Monitor.

There is no reason not to move to a touch screen interface... fully eliminating the mouse/trackpad intermediate experience (It's more natural to touch a screen than it is to manipulate a mouse... easier to learn, and faster to master). The trade offs are the ergometrics, and most of that would be de-evolving from the 'computer workstation' mode to the 'human workstation' mode.

.

Hold your hand up to your screen for half an hour and see how your arm feels. It's one thing to use touch gestures on a horizontal surface and quite another to use them on a vertical surface. And if you emulate using touch gestures on a laptop screen, the gestures cause the screen to shake back and forth, so they'd have to engineer a way to lock the screen in the desired position (not a problem for the iMac). In addition (and even though Apple has "accepted" this for iPhones and iPads), fingerprints all over the screen makes it a little tough to do serious work. Marking text or navigating to a specific insertion point in a Word document is still faster and easier with a mouse.

What I see happening is that the touch pad will get larger and possibly turn into a screen of its own, although I don't know where one would rest their wrists if it got much larger than it is today.

As for the mouse, people who mainly surf the web, navigate to Facebook pages and send tweets won't need one. But people who still do serious work in complex applications creating spreadsheets, long documents, working in Video editors, Photoshop, etc., will continue to (want to) use a mouse. In spite of all the multi-touch gestures, I still go nuts when I don't have a mouse...it substantially decreases my efficiency.
post #38 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Lion takes this a step further by renaming and enhancing Expose's F9 "all windows" mode under the new moniker Mission Control, which further integrates Spaces and Dashboard, showing both all open windows and all alternative desktops (including Dashboard) within any parallel Spaces being used.

It's still called All windows. Mission Control isn't mentioned anywhere in Lion.
JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
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JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
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post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLL View Post

It's still called All windows. Mission Control isn't mentioned anywhere in Lion.

They call it Mission Control in the trackpad/mouse preferences.

Does All WIndows bring up various desktops, too?
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #40 of 53
It would be a pain to have to switch between two different tablets all the time.
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  • Mac OS X 10.7 Lion: new multitouch gestures, Dock integration for Exposé, Launchpad, Mission Control
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