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iOS location data prompts investigations of Apple in South Korea, Europe - Page 2

post #41 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brometheus View Post

Good question. I would probably think the same way, but I wouldn't post my thoughts. Yes, I have a pro-Apple bias in terms of what makes me want to post something.

Seems MS was getting data off our computers 12-15 years ago that got alot of attention.

The only thing that really bothers me is I hope my wife does not find out I went to the Red Light Ranch in AZ over the weekend to do some "research" on this tracking problem.
post #42 of 102
Google does it and its "BLOODY MURDER!!!" Apple does it and "Its ok" I do not want ANYONE, no how, no why to track me. There should've been a way to turn it off.
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #43 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleZilla View Post

Apple needs to get on this quick. All over the Internet people are freaking out. Not just at tech sites. Everywhere. And the mainstream media are feeding their fears.

People don't care about the details. They think that iPhones are feeding your whereabouts and personal info directly to people watching you on a monitor all day long.

Time to respond, Apple.

The Internet can kiss Steve's bony ass.
post #44 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brometheus View Post

Good question. I would probably think the same way, but I wouldn't post my thoughts. Yes, I have a pro-Apple bias in terms of what makes me want to post something.

Good honest answer. We all have our things we choose to overlook. I tend to be much more quizzical about issues than some others, and still can admit that some of my questions never make it into a forum post due to my own personal bias. We're probably not much different.

The ones that I take issue with are those that spout a party-line across the board, whether in politics, religion or forums like this. Many of those members have little original to offer other than their anger.
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post #45 of 102
ROFL!

Yeah, for you that file needs to go.
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post #46 of 102
I’m surprised this non-story is still going on? Though I did expect Apple or Jobs to release some statement by now.

edit: Just read the MR article where Jobs did respond.
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post #47 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Google does it and its "BLOODY MURDER!!!" Apple does it and "Its ok" I do not want ANYONE, no how, no why to track me. There should've been a way to turn it off.

Google does what? If you have no idea what you are talking about, it's best to remain silent.
post #48 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Im surprised this non-story is still going on? Though I did expect Apple or Jobs to release some statement by now.

edit: Just read the MR article where Jobs did respond.

Link? I'm awful with internet shorthand.
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post #49 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Google does it and its "BLOODY MURDER!!!" Apple does it and "Its ok" I do not want ANYONE, no how, no why to track me. There should've been a way to turn it off.

Oh, boo-hoo. Don't want anyone to track you? Don't carry any smartphone with a GPS radio. You know that if they set their minds to it, the police can track anyone with a GPS signal? They just need to tune in from the head end. Want to use social media? GPS.

I didn't give a damn about the google location "scandals" either, so where does that leave you?

What's more, location data doesn't require a warrant. It's not, in the opinion of several court decisions, something for which the cops need to go to a judge for. They go to the "police AT&T or Verizon website" and get as much data as they want. Where you were at what time, when you made calls, to what number and so on. So if you told them you were across town, they gotcha. "Well, sir, your cell phone was right next to the crime scene five minutes before."

Now, a) encrypt your backups. This will make the copy on your computer unreadable. b) don't jailbreak. It would require access to the root directory to read from this file, and an app that doesn't exist -- and won't -- on the App Store. There. "Problem" solved.

Some prior location data is necessary to keep. Why? You start up a program that requires GPS data. It opens, asks you if that's okay to turn on GPS. You say yes, but you're still in the parking garage. The app will crash (by design) if you keep on searching for the satellite for long. So to get you started, the app goes to "prior locations" and puts you at the last fix the towers have for you. When you go out the parking exit, the GPS takes over. There's an API to deal with this data, and there has to be.

I would like Apple to clarify what they were doing, though.
post #50 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Link? I'm awful with internet shorthand.

No problem. I dont mind informing people of internet shorthand but I do expect them to learn it after its been stated. MR on Apple-based tech forums refers to Mac Rumors.
http://www.macrumors.com/2011/04/25/...-track-anyone/
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post #51 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

No problem. I dont mind informing people of internet shorthand but I do expect them to learn it after its been stated. MR on Apple-based tech forums refers to Mac Rumors.
http://www.macrumors.com/2011/04/25/...-track-anyone/

Gotcha. Written on the back of my hand so I won't forget.
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post #52 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddych View Post

Lets say someone at your workplace was murdered. Police suspect you. They subpoena your phone and your computer to look for evidence. They find consolidated.db and discover that lo and behold, you were near the location when the victim was murdered, when actually, you had accidentally left your cell phone at work.

Based on this circumstantial evidence and flawed eyewitness testimony (happens all the time) you are convicted and executed, because you live in Texas.

Don't worry I have a good lawyer.

I busted a mirror and got seven years bad luck, but my lawyer thinks he can get me five.

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post #53 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

That still doesnt change the fact the file can be used for grief. Its already being used by violent man to track down there spouse and find the location of women shelters. By parents to find out where there teens have been, ... the dangers associated with that file are all over the net, just take the time to read.

As long as they have a Mac.
post #54 of 102
One of the things that irritates me about this discussion is the fact that everyone has just sort-of taken it for granted that the location data being recorded on the device reflects where you have beenwith the device. That is, there is an assumption that this data tracks your physical whereabouts over time. There hasn't been any real attempt to understand what the locations that are being recorded represent; everyone just drones on and on endlessly about it, promulgating the story without any fact checking.

Anyone that wants to do so can look into this information and test drive it for themselves, plus they can read up on it before posting misinformation to their blog (AI are you listening?). If the do this they will find that there are tons of discussions on the internet right now regarding what data is in this file, and they will find that it is by no means clear at all that this data is tracking the location of the device.

Beyond that, an honest look at the data will reveal this: most of the data points in this file reflect locations you have NOT been . There are literally hundreds (if not thousands) of data points in this file scattered across a huge geographic region. I did this myself and I can tell you with certainty that I have not been to most of the coordinates recorded in this file. It shows data points ranging across hundreds of miles in locations within a metro where I have not been in many years (or ever). As a matter of fact, the one place I am a LOT (my home) doesn't even appear in the list, nor do many of the other places I visit with regularity.

I can tell you, however, what does appear to be in that list, and that is the locations of cell towers.

Apple hasn't explained the purpose of this file, and it might be helpful for them to issue a press release explaining it. However, based on what I have seen with my own eyes I doubt very sincerely that this information is (or could be) used to track the actual device location.

Publications' like Apple Insider are just fanning the flames by continuing to present the issue as one of device tracking when in reality they have no actual understanding of what the data really is. It is disingenuous at best, and in some circles it would be called 'lying'.
post #55 of 102
The sad, funny, and interesting thing about all this hype is that Google is guilty of doing just about the same thing as it was released last Friday, but that's barely being mentioned. Everything Apple is the lead on page one, every other company is under the fold or mentioned four paragraphs deep in the Apple article.

I heard these guys on the radio bragging how they're safe 'cuz they have Android phones. People not in the know listen to these types of folks and spread inaccurate info and it spreads like a virus. While Google gets away with it. The press needs to be more accurate and fair in their reporting and stop using 'Apple' for clicks or just to be Apple bashers and get listeners.
post #56 of 102
Has anyone seen any articles yet as to why a phone would store this information? I am sure there must be a good reason for the iPhone to store cell tower data, but not being an expert, I have no idea what that reason would be.
post #57 of 102
This issue has turned into a gold mine for the Tin Pot politicians and the Tin Foil hat crowd. Now they have something to worry about.

Apple can let them all crawl back under their rocks by making the collection of the data an option. Of course they will have to make the default NO as most whiny users are incapable of reading instructions to determine how to protect themselves.
post #58 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by tt92618 View Post

One of the things that irritates me about this discussion is the fact that everyone has just sort-of taken it for granted that the location data being recorded on the device reflects where you have beenwith the device. That is, there is an assumption that this data tracks your physical whereabouts over time. There hasn't been any real attempt to understand what the locations that are being recorded represent; everyone just drones on and on endlessly about it, promulgating the story without any fact checking.

Anyone that wants to do so can look into this information and test drive it for themselves, plus they can read up on it before posting misinformation to their blog (AI are you listening?). If the do this they will find that there are tons of discussions on the internet right now regarding what data is in this file, and they will find that it is by no means clear at all that this data is tracking the location of the device.

Beyond that, an honest look at the data will reveal this: most of the data points in this file reflect locations you have NOT been . There are literally hundreds (if not thousands) of data points in this file scattered across a huge geographic region. I did this myself and I can tell you with certainty that I have not been to most of the coordinates recorded in this file. It shows data points ranging across hundreds of miles in locations within a metro where I have not been in many years (or ever). As a matter of fact, the one place I am a LOT (my home) doesn't even appear in the list, nor do many of the other places I visit with regularity.

I can tell you, however, what does appear to be in that list, and that is the locations of cell towers.

Apple hasn't explained the purpose of this file, and it might be helpful for them to issue a press release explaining it. However, based on what I have seen with my own eyes I doubt very sincerely that this information is (or could be) used to track the actual device location.

Publications' like Apple Insider are just fanning the flames by continuing to present the issue as one of device tracking when in reality they have no actual understanding of what the data really is. It is disingenuous at best, and in some circles it would be called 'lying'.

Well you can't use this data to get the exact locations that you have been, but you can use it to find your general location. That is you can't use it to say that someone visited the Empire State Building. However you can use it to say that they made a trip to Manhattan. Of course, if you are really concerned about this sort of thing you might not want to carry around a cell phone because your cell phone carrier already has this information.
post #59 of 102
When did this happen? You sounds as if finding and using this file is common knowledge when it absolutely is not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

That still doesnt change the fact the file can be used for grief. Its already being used by violent man to track down there spouse and find the location of women shelters. By parents to find out where there teens have been, ... the dangers associated with that file are all over the net, just take the time to read...
post #60 of 102
Relax this is just an investigation. It likely will amount to a whole lotta' nothing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Told you so. Apple's smugness could come back to bite them in the derrière.
post #61 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddych View Post

Lets say someone at your workplace was murdered. Police suspect you. They subpoena your phone and your computer to look for evidence. They find consolidated.db and discover that lo and behold, you were near the location when the victim was murdered, when actually, you had accidentally left your cell phone at work.

Based on this circumstantial evidence and flawed eyewitness testimony (happens all the time) you are convicted and executed, because you live in Texas.

the police could already do that, they just need a pen register request to get all data about location that the cell cos have recorded.

There may be other proof of a phone being left behind, like the unansered calls logs, and timestamps of when voice mails were listened to...sg if a VM is left at 6PM and played back at 745am the next day, the "left it in the office" defense could actually be used as evidence that you were NOT there because you would have checked your voice mail within 13 hours I would assume, and 745 is the usual arrival time...etc...

I don't like what Apple is doing one bit, but this is not a reason to be afraid of law enforcement, this is a reason that attractive females should be cautious about taking their computers in to service centers like geek squad with the creeps that generally work there...
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post #62 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swift View Post

Oh, boo-hoo. Don't want anyone to track you? Don't carry any smartphone with a GPS radio. You know that if they set their minds to it, the police can track anyone with a GPS signal? They just need to tune in from the head end. Want to use social media? GPS.

I didn't give a damn about the google location "scandals" either, so where does that leave you?

What's more, location data doesn't require a warrant. It's not, in the opinion of several court decisions, something for which the cops need to go to a judge for. They go to the "police AT&T or Verizon website" and get as much data as they want. Where you were at what time, when you made calls, to what number and so on. So if you told them you were across town, they gotcha. "Well, sir, your cell phone was right next to the crime scene five minutes before."

I can confirm that, at least in my state, no warrants are needed for police to get cell phone tower-based location information from the wireless providers. We regularly obtain those data during Search and Rescue missions - it just requires an official request.

Just to be clear, this is separate from the GPS location data that are transmitted from the phone if a 911 call is made (and if that feature is enabled, which it is by default on most phones), which doesn't even require the involvement of the provider.
post #63 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleZilla View Post

They think that iPhones are feeding your whereabouts and personal info directly to people watching you on a monitor all day long.

Maybe some people think that, but I doubt many do. I suppose more are concerned that the scenario you describe could 'become' a possibility. Apple is a corporation and like all corporations they make a product or sell a service... or sell your info to another company that makes a product or sells a service.... all because they want your money. It's called doing business.

Personally, I find it ironic that Big Brother is voicing concerns over this. You know... the folks that will grope your crotch or take 'nekkid pictures' of you when you want to get on an airplane. I suspect this is just posturing and pandering.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I keep my iPhone in my pocket along with my wallet and my keys. My computer is protected by a username & password. So let me get this straight... If someone mugged me and got a hold of my iPhone, they would also have the keys to my car and my house along with all my credit cards. First on their list of things to steal would obviously be my consolidated.db file.

Nah... it'll be third on the list. But seriously... while this tracking capability may potentially provide improved or additional services from Apple or third parties... I'd still like to be able to flat out turn it off and not have data collected. Just because I'm paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get me. Big Brother that is. Apple isn't going to toss me in jail, or take away my property or civil rights, or execute me... that's what governments do. And in the US, that's fundamentally why we have the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Too much power inevitably leads to abuse.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jb510 View Post

Apple is going to know when and where I'm going before I do, next time I pull of the interstate to use the restroom their going to send a man ahead to be there selling iWipes.

**Cckkgghhhaaaaccckk. cough cough** iWipes. iLove it

OH!! OOOOH!!!! OOOOO!!! Fed Ex just pulled up. iPad has arrived.
post #64 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddych View Post

Lets say someone at your workplace was murdered. Police suspect you. They subpoena your phone and your computer to look for evidence. They find consolidated.db and discover that lo and behold, you were near the location when the victim was murdered, when actually, you had accidentally left your cell phone at work.

Based on this circumstantial evidence and flawed eyewitness testimony (happens all the time) you are convicted and executed, because you live in Texas.

You can construct perfectly logical hypotheticals for anything. But the relevant question is how likely is it to happen. You can go crazy trying to stop every possible eventuality of bad things happening to you in life, or you can just deal with the most likely ones: getting sick, losing your job, wrecking your car, etc. It is perfectly possible that an airliner can crash with me on it, but I choose not to deny myself the fun and excitement of international vacations to mitigate that possibility.
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post #65 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post

How is blazes is this about "smugness"?? Seriously, anthropmorphizing [sic] human emotion to corporate entities is bloody silly........

Meant to say 'perceived' smugness.

Of course, that brings up the point about athropomorphzing..... but that's what people do. The law does that too. (See, e.g., http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corporate_personhood). Get over it.
post #66 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

How do people think the iPhone knows when you have been to a particular Wi-Fi spot before? Further, many devices come shipped with locations services in which a user selects to turn on or off.

I think the big issue is how easy it is to access. Hidden is by no means secure, it should have been encrypted.

As to whether Apple is loading it to their servers, if they are then they should get raked over the coals as that definitely would need some explanation.
post #67 of 102
Investigations are not launched based on "perceived smugness". Seeing that smugness isn't against the law.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Meant to say 'perceived' smugness.
post #68 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

Investigations are not launched based on "perceived smugness". Seeing that smugness isn't against the law.

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post #69 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Meant to say 'perceived' smugness.

Of course, that brings up the point about athropomorphzing..... but that's what people do. The law does that too. (See, e.g., http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corporate_personhood). Get over it.

in spite of it being something that the average activist does to demonize others conservative or liberal, corporate or individual - labellist reductionism. It then becomes a meme that the average person unwittingly buys into because they don't question the validity of the label to begin with. Hence my "prickliness" about doing it. Smugness, anger, or whatever may incidentally reflect the head of the corporate entity's attitude, it may incidentally reflect the feeling of most of the people in a given institution, but not the entity itself. For example I could label you a pompous reductionist ass with delusion's of godhood*. I could even attempt to justify it by citing words you had written in these threads as examples of said labels. But in fact all I am doing is reducing the opportunity to actually engage you in conversation, and inviting you to engage in a response which likely would resort to the same (or worse) level of labelling me in response.

Neither you nor I benefit at the personal level by that, and in pretty much the same way it doesn't add any useable information to a posting when you apply it in reference to any other entity, corporate or otherwise.

Now as to your reference to wikipedia, while a convenient source it is neither definitive nor authoritative. Its a decent entry I guess, but is a starting point that needs much better sourcing. Corporate "personhood" is a convenient fiction to try and change the political contribution landscape in the US. It remains to be seen if the voters in the US will leave it as it is, or demand a change.

By and large you and I are in agreement opinion-wise in many of our postings herein, whether we choose to directly agree in post or just nod heads and move on. My intent was not to put you on the defensive, for which, if I have done, I apologize.

Now back to our regularly scheduled disagreements!



*a label that was applied to me in another blog. Made me chuckle as it sounded very close to a Star Trek quote about Captain Kirk. As I happen to like William Shatner, I don't have a problem with it.
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post #70 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I’m surprised this non-story is still going on? Though I did expect Apple or Jobs to release some statement by now.

edit: Just read the MR article where Jobs did respond.

Not sure that his response there helps much.

Quote:
Oh yes they do. We don't track anyone. The info circulating around is false.

So they don't use the data.. people have discovered as much by looking at how that file was treated. But the phone IS tracking your data. So if they're not using it, it is (like I and others said initially) more than likely a bug. And the bug isn't "False" Whatever the meaning of that file, it clearly exists, and it's not just some site trying to make it up.

They do use your information though, they say as much in their privacy policy. Again, that isn't an issue (and they dealt with it last year). This bugged file is.

I agree that people are blowing it out of proportion, but Apple should officially respond to this. Not a short 1-2 sentence response either.
post #71 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Menno View Post

Not sure that his response there helps much.



So they don't use the data.. people have discovered as much by looking at how that file was treated. But the phone IS tracking your data. So if they're not using it, it is (like I and others said initially) more than likely a bug. And the bug isn't "False" Whatever the meaning of that file, it clearly exists, and it's not just some site trying to make it up.

They do use your information though, they say as much in their privacy policy. Again, that isn't an issue (and they dealt with it last year). This bugged file is.

I agree that people are blowing it out of proportion, but Apple should officially respond to this. Not a short 1-2 sentence response either.

The phone is not tracking your location - Steve is right, the stuff circulating around IS false, because the locations in that file are NOT places you have visited.
post #72 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Menno View Post

Not sure that his response there helps much.



So they don't use the data.. people have discovered as much by looking at how that file was treated. But the phone IS tracking your data. So if they're not using it, it is (like I and others said initially) more than likely a bug. And the bug isn't "False" Whatever the meaning of that file, it clearly exists, and it's not just some site trying to make it up.

They do use your information though, they say as much in their privacy policy. Again, that isn't an issue (and they dealt with it last year). This bugged file is.

I agree that people are blowing it out of proportion, but Apple should officially respond to this. Not a short 1-2 sentence response either.

And I think you and Glenn Beck should come clean, too.
post #73 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddych View Post

Lets say someone at your workplace was murdered. Police suspect you. They subpoena your phone and your computer to look for evidence. They find consolidated.db and discover that lo and behold, you were near the location when the victim was murdered, when actually, you had accidentally left your cell phone at work.

Based on this circumstantial evidence and flawed eyewitness testimony (happens all the time) you are convicted and executed, because you live in Texas.

LOL, The data can actually help you as it showed you had no movement for the entire day.
post #74 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenwk View Post

LOL, The data can actually help you as it showed you had no movement for the entire day.

Listen, can we be serious for a moment? This information cannot help ANYONE because it does not show ANYTHING about where you have been with your device. The claims that it does are entirely false - the locations being recorded do not reflect the actual location of the phone at any point.

I am surprised at the legs this worthless story has, and disappointed at Apple Insider for continuing to disgorge it.
post #75 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by tt92618 View Post

The phone is not tracking your location - Steve is right, the stuff circulating around IS false, because the locations in that file are NOT places you have visited.

actually, the program released artificially makes the data less accurate. According to several groups (including the team over at thisismynext.com) the data is actually more accurate, though still not pinpoint level (because that's not really needed)

It's also attempting to get your location from Wifi networks and cell sites, not GPS. Some errors are to be expected because of this.
post #76 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Menno View Post

actually, the program released artificially makes the data less accurate. According to several groups (including the team over at thisismynext.com) the data is actually more accurate, though still not pinpoint level (because that's not really needed)

It's also attempting to get your location from Wifi networks and cell sites, not GPS. Some errors are to be expected because of this.

Looking at the raw data (not degraded by the viewing program) for my phone, some of the locations are clearly cell towers, with multiple hits on them, while other locations are less obvious and could be wi-fi locations, except that they are in the cell tower table rather than the wi-fi table. The phone registers with cell towers at some distance of course (I have some hits at 30 miles), making those data quite inaccurate in terms of phone location. Wi-fi locations would potentially give much better resolution due to their limited range. I haven't yet plotted all the wi-fi locations to see how they look.
post #77 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post

Now as to your reference to wikipedia, while a convenient source it is neither definitive nor authoritative. Its a decent entry I guess....

If it wasn't a good entry, I would not have provided you the link.

It was the result of a US Supreme Court decision in 1886, and believe it or not, they did not have the internet in those days.

Now, that is smugness.
post #78 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

Looking at the raw data (not degraded by the viewing program) for my phone, some of the locations are clearly cell towers, with multiple hits on them, while other locations are less obvious and could be wi-fi locations, except that they are in the cell tower table rather than the wi-fi table. The phone registers with cell towers at some distance of course (I have some hits at 30 miles), making those data quite inaccurate in terms of phone location. Wi-fi locations would potentially give much better resolution due to their limited range. I haven't yet plotted all the wi-fi locations to see how they look.

You've pointed out the truth in this entire thing: the phone is not tracking your location, it is tracking the location of network access points it has been in communication with. I certainly cannot pretend to know why that data is being recorded - if I have to guess, it is probably engineering data. But regardless, the important point is that this data does not accurately reflect your locations - the phone is not tracking you, or even doing anything remotely of the sort.

I fail to see the flap over this. What use is it to anyone if there is an entry at some random time stamp on your device which happens to correspond to a cell tower 3.2 miles away from the Starbucks where you were having coffee at the time? How can that be seen as even remotely 'tracking' you? The location is the tower, not you; you could have been anywhere within the reach of that tower's signal, and that is a big area. There is no way knowing the location of the tower itself could help someone positively identify where you (or your phone for that matter) were at the time. To look at a situation like that and draw from it the conclusion that the device is tracking your location strains credulity, and to promulgate that and present it as fact the way Apple Insider and countless other publications have is dishonesty on a scale that quite frankly takes my breath away. It is ridiculous.
post #79 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by tt92618 View Post

... To look at a situation like that and draw from it the conclusion that the device is tracking your location strains credulity, and to promulgate that and present it as fact the way Apple Insider and countless other publications have is dishonesty on a scale that quite frankly takes my breath away. It is ridiculous.

Well, don't stop there, we also have those, like Menno, who are paid to come here and do just that.
post #80 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

Wi-fi locations would potentially give much better resolution due to their limited range. I haven't yet plotted all the wi-fi locations to see how they look.

Probably what Google was up to with their WIFI break ins. They want pin point location of wifi networks, which could be relevant if it was a static IP but many cable providers DHCP your IP so it can change.

Even though many office networks are public info for address blocks it isn't always accurate for location. For example my office iP block is actually part of our datacenter block which is two miles away. I'm not sure how they derive geo location from IP with any accuracy other than country and maybe city since there are so many exceptions.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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