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Location tracking probe expands despite 2001 FCC law requiring all phones track users - Page 2

post #41 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Except that this w as explained a year ago to Congress by Apple. This isn't something new, or something that they don't already know. Apple stated that it was for the purpose of building up a map of Cell towers, as other cell providers are doing. It's to aid the purpose of knowing where people in general are going so as to find the most needed places for transmitters.

It was made plenty clear. Why the database in the phone holds such o,d data, I don't know, but as that data is being collected every 12 hours, it can be kept forever anyway, so I don't see the big deal here. As it can also easily be encrypted, it's not something that's being collected no matter what. If someone doesn't want others to see it, they can encrypt their data backups.

What I consider far more invidious is what Eric Schmitt said several times in speeches about Google's intentions, which is something being forgotten in this situation. He, quite baldly, said that that someday Google would know more about you than you do about yourself, and that they would make decisions for you before you knew you would want to make them. Now, THAT worries me!

I don't recall Apple ever indicating, at any time, that something like that was in their sights.

You stated previously in post 18 that these data are transmitted to Apple every 12 hours, and another poster commented that this information seemed inconsistent with most other reports. Do you have a source or reference for that?
post #42 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I've been following this story rather closely, and there hasn't been any info yet that I've seen which would indicate Apple ever downloads your location data.

If you're going to throw 100% of the blame on Apple, the onus is on you to reference the data and tell us where you got this tidbit of information from.

Apple stated this at one point a year or so ago when they testified before Congress about this and other matters.

I'm not "accusing" Apple of anything. Accusing them would indicate that I'm saying they're doing something wrong, which I'm not.
post #43 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

How many times must this rehashed? The log is kept on your device and in your iTunes folder backup for your device for the very reason one wold expect your phone to know your location on a cellular network. Consolidated.db is not sent to Apple. They are not tracking you.

The only things sent to Apple are zipcodes that are not tied to a device or a user. This is a separate issue from the consolidated.db and was dealt with almost a year ago in both a change in the privacy policy and a letter to a senator explaining all this.

Apple does collect location data, but it's consolidated data, which isn't identified by phone or user. Apple already stated that it's for the purpose of building up cell tower maps. This is something that's done deliberately. It's not a problem because it's anonymised.
post #44 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post

Only complete morons think this is an issue. My god, my phone is collecting and storing my personal information and only on my own personal devices which I control! Oh, that's right, it's my email, contacts, personal documents, calendar, etc. etc. etc.

Idiots abound!

Hell ya!

Apps can't see the data and if someone accesses my computer or gets hold of my phone, my location history will be the least of my worries.

That said, I can't wait to see a murder solve on Law and Order because their cell phone's location history was tracked. Oh wait! It's already been done; only the data came from the carrier.

Can we get over this now and move on?
post #45 of 127
Let's see what this location tracking is all about until the hearing on May 10th. I agree that privacy is an important concern here and lets not hope the facts does not otherwise prove that. Logging data and what its use. However, most of us, fellow readers, including myself, reads the title and create our own context based on the headline and all fingers points the blame to Apple. Sad to know that this issue has blown out of proportion. Its a good article. It caught everyone's attention. It created this havoc in the mobile industry. Good for those two internet guys - you made yourself an overnight sensation! Now what? I'm hoping that Apple knows that there's a thin line in privacy that they're not doing the data logs for other purposes rather than it just sits there in consolidated.db - Congress will not like these location tracking because they're not a big fan of their location being known, at any time.

Now back to the economy - Home Sales are up! Apple stock is down because of this. Now, when the party dies, the stock will come up again!!! All this negativity brought the AAPL stock down today. Stop pointing the blame to Apple - its the smart phone industry in general.

(Patiently waiting for the iPhone White release).

Happy Tuesday Everyone!
post #46 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

You stated previously in post 18 that these data are transmitted to Apple every 12 hours, and another poster commented that this information seemed inconsistent with most other reports. Do you have a source or reference for that?

If I can find it again.

I can't find that particular article now, but Apple's response to Congress in this letter should help to show what it gets transmitted from our phones, when it's transmitted, and why.

Most relevant info begins at the bottom of page 5 part C -Location based information. You'll notice that some info is sent when location services are turned on, and agreed to, and some is sent when using GPS of WiFi, whenever they are used. Apple is pretty explicit about this, and if you read it carefully, you will understand what's happening. They don't mention the consolidated.db file, I would assume, because they were being asked about what was being transmitted, not for what was being saved.

http://markey.house.gov/docs/applema...ton7-12-10.pdf
post #47 of 127
By the way ... my computer is readily available for location tracking ... so should the PC market also be brought in all this hearings??? It's my home where I sleep - now that's privacy!
post #48 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

I'm not bothered about whether my phone stores data about where I go. What I am bothered about is that when Apple is asked what data their phone stores, there is a huge silence and no comment from the company, but when Google is asked the same question they give a prompt and clear reply.

What does Apple have to hide?

Apple has nothing to hide. But they are probably being advised by their lawyers not to address the issue via a press release now that there is a law suit, the hearing etc. Because the blogs etc will hack a press release apart as lying, spin etc. But if the courts and/or the government examine the issue and are satisfied that Apple is not receiving this list or any other data of concern then at least some of the public will be satisfied that the issue is nothing to gross about

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post #49 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

If I can find it again.

If this is the statement to which you refer, then it appears to state that the cell tower and wifi data contained within consolidated.db may be transmitted to Apple if:
  1. The location services option is ON and,
  2. The user launches an app that requests location services.
post #50 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

If this is the statement to which you refer, then it appears to state that the cell tower and wifi data contained within consolidated.db may be transmitted to Apple if:
  1. The location services option is ON and,
  2. The user launches an app that requests location services.

And there is no device or user data sent and all lat/long locations are converted to a zipcode and then immediately deleted.

Surely people expect apps that you allow know your devices specific location will know your general location.
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post #51 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

The problem is "consolidated.db" doesn't operate in accordance with the policies defined in that document. The user cannot turn it off and the data it stores is kept forever. Even if you get a new phone, the old data is copied to the new phone via iTunes.

They could be argued to be within the stated policy if turning off location services prevents transmission. I didn't see anything about the phone not recording cell towers and wifi points in that situation.
post #52 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

A very poorly written article filled with so many bad pieces of information that I'm not going to spend time debunking it.

I'll just say that, speaking as an small iPhone developer, my iPhone is now off and will stay off until this issue is resolved.

As a small developer myself, what issue? I decided to check out just how accurate the data is that is collected in regard to my true location. Over a 36 hour period, I found it could pin point my location within the Phoenix metro to within a 43 square mile area.

http://www.noisetech-software.com/Di...atability.html

So from what I see, it is pretty clear:

1) When you upgrade an iOS device or activate it, you are given an option to Opt-Out of sharing data with Apple. This falls under the "Diagnostic and Usage Data". Clicking on "Details" will spell out things more. With the Opt-Out set, you will still get location data available on the device but items like crash logs and location data will not be shared.

2) Under Settings->General-Restrictions, you can turn off Location for the "Following Apps". Apple never claims, for those that read, that all location data is turned off. Just specific apps cannot use location data.

3) Location data is still used for things like emergency calling where rapid and accurate location determination can be life saving.

4) Passively collecting this data VS driving cars (like Foursquare and Google with StreetView) saves about 1000 tons of CO2/year from being emitted.

The only real issue is Apple needs to simply cull the data and not keep an infinite amount. Keep 2 weeks or 2 months or some set amount that is reasonable to achieve the desired effect. Likewise, using the Data Protection APIs (if they are not already) to make sure the actual data is encrypted on the device. For those that think this is an issue, it is easily handled by the user by using strong pass codes on handsets, logins and encrypted iPhone backups.
post #53 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

And there is no device or user data sent and all lat/long locations are converted to a zipcode and then immediately deleted.

Surely people expect apps that you allow know your devices specific location will know your general location.

That does seem to be kind of essential, but the specific complaints, as I interpret them, are slightly different:
  1. Apple is collecting and storing your location data (presumably not anonymized, although may people don't seem to understand the difference).
  2. Even if Apple is not collecting it then it is lying around unnecessarily unencrypted on your phone (although as has been pointed out before - there is likely much more sensitive information to be harvested from your phone).
post #54 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprockkets View Post

Look, we know that this whole fiasco is nothing, but what does locating people when they call 911 have to do with private companies tracking you for business purposes?

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Where is Apple tracking YOU without your consent?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sprockkets View Post

That's not what I asked or brought up.

I guess you were referring to Google/Android but it was too painful to you to actually mention them by name.
post #55 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

And perhaps Apple will make that argument to Congress. But I doubt it will get very far. Tracking someones movements whether they want it done or not is something that's done to criminals.

Anyway, bringing "consolidated.db" in line with the iPhone EULA (i.e. the user can turn it off) and encrypting the data would go a long way towards making me happy with how they're handling this data.

On your first point - I agree, unless it is anonymized, in which case there is really no privacy issue. On your second - yes - it is hard to see why that would cause any problems and it would probably make a lot of people happier.
post #56 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

It's also lying around on your computer via iTunes. From there, anyone can write a Mac or PC application that accesses the data. Two guys doing exactly that is what set this whole thing off to begin with.

True, and maybe that could be an issue for some, but if someone obtained access to one of my machines then I would have a lot more to worry about than my iPhone location data. So maybe the backups should be encrypted by default.
post #57 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

That does seem to be kind of essential, but the specific complaints, as I interpret them, are slightly different:
  1. Apple is collecting and storing your location data (presumably not anonymized, although may people don't seem to understand the difference).
  2. Even if Apple is not collecting it then it is lying around unnecessarily unencrypted on your phone (although as has been pointed out before - there is likely much more sensitive information to be harvested from your phone).

1) They said last year the zipcode they collect is anonymous. Not connection to a device or user.
2) Your phone isnt open to the world. Its not like you can read the info on the phone or copy to some other drive as easily as you see in movies by attached some dongle or getting near some BT receiver. And even if they could is that generalized location data really more important than the other data on your phone? Do people think that their contacts are stored in 5 layers of AES-256 encryption on their phone? And if it bothers people they can encrypt their backups on their PC which also should be password protected.
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post #58 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

1) They said last year the zipcode they collect is anonymous. Not connection to a device or user.
2) Your phone isnt open to the world. Its not like you can read the info on the phone or copy to some other drive as easily as you see in movies by attached some dongle or getting near some BT receiver. And even if they could is that generalized location data really more important than the other data on your phone? Do people think that their contacts are stored in 5 layers of AES-256 encryption on their phone? And if it bothers people they can encrypt their backups on their PC which also should be password protected.

I personally agree that it doesn't seem like a problem at all - I was just pointing out that the main thrust of the complaints was not whether the apps know where you are, but further use of the data. I was not defending the logic of the complaints.
post #59 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

If this is the statement to which you refer, then it appears to state that the cell tower and wifi data contained within consolidated.db may be transmitted to Apple ...

It is and the data, when transmitted, is done so anonymously.
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post #60 of 127
Why is Daniel Erin Dilger still allowed to write for Apple Insider?

He apparently doesn't know the difference between a carrier providing a location to emergency services and a manufacture storing a persistent log of all locations.

I consider many bloggers to be journalists. But DED is no journalist... he's a fiction writer.

I won't be back to AI, which is a bit unfortunate, since the actual bloggers and journalists here can be insightful and informative. Sadly for AI one bad apple does indeed spoil the bunch.
post #61 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by CurtisEMayle View Post

It is and the data, when transmitted, is done so anonymously.

Yes. And if we accept their clear statement on this (which I am inclined to do), then the transmission/collection part of the complaint would seem to be unfounded. Of course others will likely choose to disbelieve them.
post #62 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

If this is the statement to which you refer, then it appears to state that the cell tower and wifi data contained within consolidated.db may be transmitted to Apple if:
  1. The location services option is ON and,
  2. The user launches an app that requests location services.

I posted that statement before I came to your post. The statement also says that it will transmit info even if location services are turned off. The other info is often info that being requested by apps,where your exact location is needed, and wanted, by both yourself, and the app, for the purposes you purchased the app. For example; where's the nearest Mexican restaurant? Well, not useful if the app doesn't know where you are.

But Apple is collecting triangulated locations of where you are mostly from cell tower info that's not very accurate for knowing exactly where you are, but accurate enough to know if enough towers are in place for a good signal. So it MAY have the info for several hundred to a couple of thousand feet of where you may be.
post #63 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I posted that statement before I came to your post. The statement also says that it will transmit info even if location services are turned off. The other info is often info that being requested by apps,where your exact location is needed, and wanted, by both yourself, and the app, for the purposes you purchased the app. For example; where's the nearest Mexican restaurant? Well, not useful if the app doesn't know where you are.

But Apple is collecting triangulated locations of where you are mostly from cell tower info that's not very accurate for knowing exactly where you are, but accurate enough to know if enough towers are in place for a good signal. So it MAY have the info for several hundred to a couple of thousand feet of where you may be.

I still don't see where it says that the data may be transmitted if location services are off. I'm looking at page 7 main text and footnote 8. What am I missing?
post #64 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Just as a reminder, the issue isn't just whether or not Apple is collecting data. It's also who has access to your data via iTunes.

With that said, I'm off to bed.

Agreed - that is why I said just the collection/transmission part of the complaint would be unfounded.
post #65 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Points 1-4 that you used to arrive at your conclusions I think are all either wrong or irrelevant, but I don't feel like arguing them because the conclusions are the important part to me.

Oddly, there is little indication my 4 points are wrong.

1) The EULA clearly spells out the use of location data and diagnostic data. There is no indication that opting out of sharing data when you init a phone results in transmission of data. Check out F-Secures tests on this matter. They do take exception to the dialog, however, by finding it a bit opaque.

2) Apple never claims that turning off Location services disables "consolidated.db". They simply claim that it disables location services for the "following apps". This is not opinion. It is fact. For confirmation, go to the indicated screen.

3) Location data is required if at all physically available to be served on 911 calls. Again, this is not opinion. It is fact. And it is a good thing. Accurate and fast geo location data can save lives when seconds count. Having the location data available quickly precludes deleting the "consolidated.db" file completely.

4) The other option to collect much of this data is to drive around in cars. This takes gas. Why not passively collect it and save 10,000,000 miles/year in driving? Works out to 1,000 tons of CO2 emissions/year. Given the .19 ppm/year rise in the past 10 years it is a small step, but small steps are not a bad thing.
post #66 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

As a small developer myself, what issue? I decided to check out just how accurate the data is that is collected in regard to my true location. Over a 36 hour period, I found it could pin point my location within the Phoenix metro to within a 43 square mile area.

http://www.noisetech-software.com/Di...atability.html

So from what I see, it is pretty clear:

1) When you upgrade an iOS device or activate it, you are given an option to Opt-Out of sharing data with Apple. This falls under the "Diagnostic and Usage Data". Clicking on "Details" will spell out things more. With the Opt-Out set, you will still get location data available on the device but items like crash logs and location data will not be shared.

2) Under Settings->General-Restrictions, you can turn off Location for the "Following Apps". Apple never claims, for those that read, that all location data is turned off. Just specific apps cannot use location data.

3) Location data is still used for things like emergency calling where rapid and accurate location determination can be life saving.

4) Passively collecting this data VS driving cars (like Foursquare and Google with StreetView) saves about 1000 tons of CO2/year from being emitted.

The only real issue is Apple needs to simply cull the data and not keep an infinite amount. Keep 2 weeks or 2 months or some set amount that is reasonable to achieve the desired effect. Likewise, using the Data Protection APIs (if they are not already) to make sure the actual data is encrypted on the device. For those that think this is an issue, it is easily handled by the user by using strong pass codes on handsets, logins and encrypted iPhone backups.

Exactly! From what I understand of this issue is that once you agree to do that, Apple collects this data, anonymously from then on. I don't pretend to know why the .db file is kept forever. Perhaps it's incase Apple's data gets lost or for some such reason. Unless it's a bug, and the data should be wiped after a week, or a month, or whatever.

I assume we'll hear whatever the situation is as soon as Apple's lawyers and people who work on this finish their response.
post #67 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

It's also lying around on your computer via iTunes. From there, anyone can write a Mac or PC application that accesses the data. Two guys doing exactly that is what set this whole thing off to begin with.

This was known a year earlier. These two guys came late to the party.
In addition, as has been pointed out in numerous articles on a number of sites already, the info is so imprecise that it can't be used to actually know where you were, just a very vague area.
post #68 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

I still don't see where it says that the data may be transmitted if location services are off. I'm looking at page 7 main text and footnote 8. What am I missing?

As I said, it begins at the bottom of page 5 part "C". That explains what Apple is doing about its information that doesn't depend on your constantly agreeing to sharing your location.
post #69 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Just as a reminder, the issue isn't just whether or not Apple is collecting data. It's also who has access to your data via iTunes.

With that said, I'm off to bed.

This has nothing to do with iTunes itself, just this one file which as you know by now can be encrypted when backing it up to iTunes, if you're so inclined.

As for being concerned about it as some seem to be:

http://www.pcworld.com/article/22612...t_ominous.html
post #70 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

You stated previously in post 18 that these data are transmitted to Apple every 12 hours, and another poster commented that this information seemed inconsistent with most other reports. Do you have a source or reference for that?

http://www.f-secure.com/weblog/archives/00002145.html

Note: The data is anonymized. It is NOT transmitted if you opt-out.
post #71 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

As I said, it begins at the bottom of page 5 part "C". That explains what Apple is doing about its information that doesn't depend on your constantly agreeing to sharing your location.

I guess I still disagree with your interpretation. I think you have to read C.1.a in its entirety to see the restrictions, which I think do prevent transmission if location services are off:

First, when a customer requests current location information, the device encrypts and transmits Cell Tower and Wi-Fi Access Point Information and the device's GPS coordinates (if available) over a secure Wi-Fi Internet connection to Apple.

Second, to help Apple update and maintain its database with known location information, Apple may also collect and transmit Cell Tower and Wi-Fi Access Point Information automatically. With one exception Apple automatically collects this information only (1) if the device's location-based service capabilities are toggled to "On" and (2) the customer uses an application requiring location-based information.

The exception referred to is:

For GPS-enabled devices with location-based service capabilities toggled to "On," Apple automatically collects Wi-Fi Access Point Information and GPS coordinates when a device is searching for a cellular network, such as when the device is first turned on or trying to re-establish a dropped connection. The device searches for nearby Wi-Fi access points for approximately thirty seconds. The device collects anonymous Wi-Fi Access Point Information for those that it can "see." This information and the GPS coordinates are stored (or "batched") on the device and added to the information sent to Apple. None of the information transmitted to Apple is associated with a particular user or device.
post #72 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

Oddly, there is little indication my 4 points are wrong.

But then how could we be freaked out? You spoiled the fun.
post #73 of 127
Well, it seems the info isn't very accurate in my case. When I ran the tracking program, it shows I was in and around Las Vegas about a half year ago. Too bad the last time I was anywhere near Las Vegas, or more than 300 miles west of NJ for that matter, was before the first iPod was introduced.

Generally speaking it shows where I've been since I got my iP4 back in July '10, but nothing really accurate to the point of incrimination. It's a non issue for me. I have nothing to hide and there's nothing I do that I need to be paranoid about someone finding out.

Call me ignorant, call me stupid, but I don't know what the big deal is. I'd actually rather it be there than not be there. It could even get me, or someone with me, out of trouble of a wrongful accusation at some point in time.

My two pennies.
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post #74 of 127
Is there an app that we can use to visualise the data being tracked in that file? That would be really cool to see where exactly it has tracked me.

You know, before I go all crazy about being tracked.*

*Eg. a post on MacRumors (As a former sufferer of paranoia, this is hella funny but also quite screwed up):
Originally Posted by applemagic123
Why is iphone tracker app only available for snow leopard? What is it with these pigs making all their software for snow leopard only? I have the snow leopard disk but I ain't installing that POS OS on my machine. All my backups are on regular leopard.

And WHY THE F&#^ is untrackerd ONLY available for 4.0!!! WHAT'S THE BIG DEAL WITH 4.0!!???? I need to erase my locations. A couple weeks ago there were cops just chillin' outside my house. They left within about 20 minutes, but still. I smoke marijuana, I don't want cops knowing S#I# about me!

And people wondering why I'm so mad...I have a 2g iphone on 3.1.3 Even if I had a 3gs, I would still keep it on 3.1.3 4.0 backgrounding isn't even REAL backgrounding! That's what backgrounder is for! And please, for the love of GOD, don't start talking about how oh, I shouldn't smoke weed, oh blah blah blah.
post #75 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickprinter View Post

Well, it seems the info isn't very accurate in my case. When I ran the tracking program, it shows I was in and around Las Vegas about a half year ago. Too bad the last time I was anywhere near Las Vegas, or more than 300 miles west of NJ for that matter, was before the first iPod was introduced.

Generally speaking it shows where I've been since I got my iP4 back in July '10, but nothing really accurate to the point of incrimination. It's a non issue for me. I have nothing to hide and there's nothing I do that I need to be paranoid about someone finding out.

Call me ignorant, call me stupid, but I don't know what the big deal is. I'd actually rather it be there than not be there. It could even get me, or someone with me, out of trouble of a wrongful accusation at some point in time.

My two pennies.

Where is the tracking program? I will search for it but if someone can chime in that would be great.
post #76 of 127
Okay, here's the link to see what exactly has been tracked:
http://petewarden.github.com/iPhoneTracker/
post #77 of 127
Wow. Pretty damn cool, actually. But certainly frightening for some people. I think the issue that Apple has to address, and soon, is why it keeps this data on a permanent-cache basis and why it does it continually rather than on-demand by certain apps or what not.

The other point it raises is that it is able to pull location data even when many apps and the Maps app says "location cannot be determined". I suppose there is a filter on these apps that determine the accuracy of the location and decides how valid the location is. What is interesting and concerning is that this location is tracked regularly behind-the-scenes.

Fascinating indeed. Now to log on to Cydia and zap the file. (untrackerd by Ryan Petrich)
post #78 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Again, this is just speculation on the part of the folks who wrote that article. It's not a policy statement from Apple. And it's speculation that, on the face of it, does't make a lot of sense. Why would Apple be collecting that information in consolidated.db if consolidated.db is not sent to Apple? They can't build a database from data they never receive.

To aid in assisted GPS or other functions? The cached data might have other uses than just sending to Apple. To build a local database? You are making the assumption the data has but a single purpose.

It is not to hard of a concept for a programmer to grasp.
post #79 of 127
There is SO much bad information in here it isn't even funny.
  • The data collected is stored on the phone and synchronized through iTunes to your computer.
  • The file on the computer can be encrypted, but it is not by default.
  • The file on the phone is inaccessible to regular apps, but totally accessible to apps that have been installed on jailbroken phones.
  • The logging of data on the phone cannot be turned off, even if Location Services are disabled.
  • The log file on the phone cannot be reset or deleted.
  • The current file format (unencrypted plain text) is new with iOS 4.x, but the iPhone has been doing this in the last several major releases.
  • If a phone is jailbroken, the data file can be obtained remotely via SSH.
  • If a phone is lost or stolen, a quick jailbreak can make the file accessible to anyone.
  • Apple stated last year that they collect location information, but this can be turned off by disabling Location Services. This does NOT apply in this situation.
  • If you replace your phone, prior location information is copied to the new phone, creating a log going back much longer than you have had the replacement phone.
  • Apple has made no comment on this issue.
  • This has nothing whatsoever to do with the FCC mandate that callers to 911 must be triangulated.
  • The phone does not need a huge log of everywhere you have been, along with when, to locate your location quickly. This can be done much more easily with a much simpler data format.
  • The utility you can download that shows you your historical location information intentionally obfuscates and reduces the accuracy of location information. The author states this on the home page. If this is used to come to the determination that the recorded location isn't accurate enough to mean anything, this is just wrong. The information recorded is good enough for E911.
  • Android location tracking is disclosed when you setup the device (or application), and it can be disabled.
  • The iOS devices are the only ones that keep a running log of location.

Personally, I wouldn't want someone to be able to track my location remotely. Through a jailbreak hack, or even a known security exploit of the phone, it is entirely possible that someone could target an iPhone owner remotely and download the data. Also, for those running computers infected with malware such as spyware, trojan, or bot, it would be very easy for someone to grab this information.

When you start to take things like the safety of your family into consideration, this is pretty bad stuff. I don't have anything to hide, but I certainly don't want an anonymous stranger being given access to my historical location information, let alone my current location.

Apple needs to turn this off, or at least give end users a way of doing so themselves.
post #80 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by djdj View Post

There is SO much bad information in here it isn't even funny.


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Personally, I wouldn't want someone to be able to track my location remotely. Through a jailbreak hack, or even a known security exploit of the phone, it is entirely possible that someone could target an iPhone owner remotely and download the data. Also, for those running computers infected with malware such as spyware, trojan, or bot, it would be very easy for someone to grab this information.

*The data is not tracking the location of the phone and typically represents positions miles from the actual phone.

* Apple also discloses this when the device is updated of first initialized with iTunes though it is a bit more opaque.
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  • Location tracking probe expands despite 2001 FCC law requiring all phones track users
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