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Apple looking to historic WWII Brisbane building for next Australian retail store

post #1 of 6
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Apple is planning to open a retail store in the historic MacArthur Chambers building in Brisbane, Australia, according to a new report.

MacTalk reports that an application filed on Friday with the Brisbane City Council to renovate the MacArthur Chambers building hints at an upcoming Apple retail store. The 1930s era building was used by U.S. general Douglas MacArthur as the allied forces' South West Pacific Area headquarters during World War II.

According to the development application, the project hopes to "create a high quality retail outlet which showcases the architectural qualities of the original Assurance Chamber and adds contemporary elements of comparable quality."

The resulting retail store, which would be Apple's eleventh store in Australia, would encompass the ground floor, mezzanine and basement and involve restorations to the heritage building.



Though Apple is not specifically mentioned on the application, the report notes that architectural drawings of the proposed renovation include "recognizable hallmarks of Apple's retail style."

"Areas for the Genius Bar, Kids Corner and iPod and iPhone accessories can be found alongside Apple's trademark sugarmaple tables and characteristic stools," the report noted. Other hints that Apple will be the tenant include plans for "a uniform stone floor finish," "new feature stairs," and three equidistant wall-mounted displays behind a long bar with stools.



The renovation would reportedly cost as much as $11.4 million, with $3.84 million alone in demolition costs to remove the existing renovations, which were built in the 1980s and revamped in 2001.



Apple has pursued a restoration strategy in several other heritage buildings, such as the Covent Garden store in London (pictured below) and a store located near the Paris Opera House.

post #2 of 6
I like the contrast of extreme high tech with old stone buildings - it's cool.
post #3 of 6
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Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I like the contrast of extreme high tech with old stone buildings - it's cool.

I agree. I was Managing Director for an Apple Centre back in the UK that was based in an architecturally historic, stone building and walking inside always reminded me of Dr. Who's TARDIS. The contrast is really fun and it works really well.
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
Google Motto "You're not the customer. You're the product."
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From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
Google Motto "You're not the customer. You're the product."
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post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I like the contrast of extreme high tech with old stone buildings - it's cool.

I completely agree.
There is also a similarity between architecture design from the first half of the 1900's and design of computer environments. The industrial revolution provided quantity and new variety of materials. That combined with changing uses of living/working spaces (people moving from farms to cities, high rise buildings to make efficient use of all those people) brought architecture as a specialty to prominence in the modern era. The fast pace of computer technology development and the amount of people starting to use them in the last decade or two benefits from the same focus in designing.
Guess I'm not really providing anything too new here, many people know about Jobs being an architecture buff. I suppose I'm just a tad bored.
Like ascii said, the contrast is very cool.
post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I agree. I was Managing Director for an Apple Centre back in the UK that was based in an architecturally historic, stone building and walking inside always reminded me of Dr. Who's TARDIS. The contrast is really fun and it works really well.

(Where shall we go today - I believe that there is an interesting archaeological dig going on in Redmond.) Go Brissy!
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Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I like the contrast of extreme high tech with old stone buildings - it's cool.

Every time I travel to Europe or even New York, I am always appreciative of the stone architecture and building methods. I can just imagine the the stone cutters with their chisels and saws. That is a lost art in the age of concrete.

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